• The Fifth Generation (5G) wireless service of sensor networks involves significant challenges when dealing with the coordination of ever-increasing number of devices accessing shared resources. This has drawn major interest from the research community as many existing works focus on the radio access network congestion control to efficiently manage resources in the context of device-to-device (D2D) interaction in huge sensor networks. In this context, this paper pioneers a study on the impact of D2D link reliability in group-assisted random access protocols, by shedding the light on beneficial performance and potential limitations of approaches of this kind against tunable parameters such as group size, number of sensors and reliability of D2D links. Additionally, we leverage on the association with a Geolocation Database (GDB) capability to assist the grouping decisions by drawing parallels with recent regulatory-driven initiatives around GDBs and arguing benefits of the suggested proposal. Finally, the proposed method is approved to significantly reduce the delay over random access channels, by means of an exhaustive simulation campaign.
  • To overcome the limitations of Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) with short range, non-supportability of high density networks, unreliable broadcast services, signal congestion and connectivity disruptions, Vehicle-to-anything (V2X) communication networks, standardized in 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Release 14, have been recently introduced to cover broader vehicular communication scenarios including vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V), vehicle-to-pedestrian (V2P) and vehicle-to-infrastructure/network (V2I/N). Motivated by the stringent connection reliability and coverage requirements in V2X , this paper presents the first comprehensive and tractable analytical framework for the uplink performance of cellular V2X networks, where the vehicles can deliver its information via vehicle-to-base station (V2B) communication or directly between vehicles in the sidelink, based on their distances and the bias factor. By practically modeling the vehicles on the roads using the doubly stochastic Cox process and the BSs, we derive new association probability of the V2B communication, new success probabilities of the V2B and V2V communications, and overall success probability of the V2X communication, which are validated by the simulations results. Our results reveal the benefits of V2X communication compared to V2V communication in terms of success probability.
  • For many, this is no longer a valid question and the case is considered settled with SDN/NFV (Software Defined Networking/Network Function Virtualization) providing the inevitable innovation enablers solving many outstanding management issues regarding 5G. However, given the monumental task of softwarization of radio access network (RAN) while 5G is just around the corner and some companies have started unveiling their 5G equipment already, the concern is very realistic that we may only see some point solutions involving SDN technology instead of a fully SDN-enabled RAN. This survey paper identifies all important obstacles in the way and looks at the state of the art of the relevant solutions. This survey is different from the previous surveys on SDN-based RAN as it focuses on the salient problems and discusses solutions proposed within and outside SDN literature. Our main focus is on fronthaul, backward compatibility, supposedly disruptive nature of SDN deployment, business cases and monetization of SDN related upgrades, latency of general purpose processors (GPP), and additional security vulnerabilities, softwarization brings along to the RAN. We have also provided a summary of the architectural developments in SDN-based RAN landscape as not all work can be covered under the focused issues. This paper provides a comprehensive survey on the state of the art of SDN-based RAN and clearly points out the gaps in the technology.
  • Fifth Generation (5G) telecommunication system is going to deliver a flexible radio access network (RAN). Security functions such as authorization, authentication and accounting (AAA) are expected to be distributed from central clouds to edge clouds. We propose a novel architectural security solution that applies to 5G networks. It is called Trust Zone (TZ) that is designed as an enhancement of the 5G AAA in the edge cloud. TZ also provides an autonomous and decentralized security policy for different tenants under variable network conditions. TZ also initiates an ability of disaster cognition and extends the security functionalities to a set of flexible and highly available emergency services in the edge cloud.
  • For the past 40 years, cellular industry has been relying on static radio access deployments with gross over-provisioning. However, to meet the exponentially growing volumes of irregular data, the very notion of a cell will have to be rethought to allow them be (re-)configured on-demand and in automated manner. This work puts forward a vision of moving networks to match dynamic user demand with network access supply in the beyond-5G cellular systems. The resulting adaptive and flexible network infrastructures will leverage intelligent capable devices (e.g., cars and drones) by employing appropriate user involvement schemes. This work is a recollection of our efforts in this space with the goal to contribute a comprehensive research agenda. Particular attention is paid to quantifying the network performance scaling and session continuity gains with ultra-dense moving cells. Our findings argue for non-incremental benefits of integrating moving access points on a par with conventional (static) cellular access infrastructure.
  • Machine-to-machine (M2M) constitutes the communication paradigm at the basis of Internet of Things (IoT) vision. M2M solutions allow billions of multi-role devices to communicate with each other or with the underlying data transport infrastructure without, or with minimal, human intervention. Current solutions for wireless transmissions originally designed for human-based applications thus require a substantial shift to cope with the capacity issues in managing a huge amount of M2M devices. In this paper, we consider the multiple access techniques as promising solutions to support a large number of devices in cellular systems with limited radio resources. We focus on non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) where, with the aim to increase the channel efficiency, the devices share the same radio resources for their data transmission. This has been shown to provide optimal throughput from an information theoretic point of view.We consider a realistic system model and characterise the system performance in terms of throughput and energy efficiency in a NOMA scenario with a random packet arrival model, where we also derive the stability condition for the system to guarantee the performance.
  • A large number of new consumer and industrial applications are likely to change the classic operator's business models and provide a wide range of new markets to enter. This article analyses the most relevant 5G use cases that require ultra-low latency, from both technical and business perspectives. Low latency services pose challenging requirements to the network, and to fulfill them operators need to invest in costly changes in their network. In this sense, it is not clear whether such investments are going to be amortized with these new business models. In light of this, specific applications and requirements are described and the potential market benefits for operators are analysed. Conclusions show that operators have clear opportunities to add value and position themselves strongly with the increasing number of services to be provided by 5G.
  • The Internet of Things (IoT) promises ubiquitous connectivity of everything everywhere, which represents the biggest technology trend in the years to come. It is expected that by 2020 over 25 billion devices will be connected to cellular networks; far beyond the number of devices in current wireless networks. Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications aims at providing the communication infrastructure for enabling IoT by facilitating the billions of multi-role devices to communicate with each other and with the underlying data transport infrastructure without, or with little, human intervention. Providing this infrastructure will require a dramatic shift from the current protocols mostly designed for human-to-human (H2H) applications. This article reviews recent 3GPP solutions for enabling massive cellular IoT and investigates the random access strategies for M2M communications, which shows that cellular networks must evolve to handle the new ways in which devices will connect and communicate with the system. A massive non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) technique is then presented as a promising solution to support a massive number of IoT devices in cellular networks, where we also identify its practical challenges and future research directions.
  • Maintaining multiple wireless connections is a promising solution to boost capacity in fifth-generation (5G) networks, where user equipment is able to consume radio resources of several serving cells simultaneously and potentially aggregate bandwidth across all of them. The emerging dual connectivity paradigm can be regarded as an attractive access mechanism in dense heterogeneous 5G networks, where bandwidth sharing and cooperative techniques are evolving to meet the increased capacity requirements. Dual connectivity in the uplink remained highly controversial, since the user device has a limited power budget to share between two different access points, especially when located close to the cell edge. On the other hand, in an attempt to enhance the uplink communications performance, the concept of uplink and downlink decoupling has recently been introduced. Leveraging these latest developments, our work significantly advances prior art by proposing and investigating the concept of flexible cell association in dual connectivity scenarios, where users are able to aggregate resources from more than one serving cell. In this setup, the preferred association policies for the uplink may differ from those for the downlink, thereby allowing for a truly decoupled access. With the use of stochastic geometry, the dual connectivity association regions for decoupled access are derived and the resultant performance is evaluated in terms of capacity gains over the conventional downlink received power access policies.
  • Cellular has always relied on static deployments for providing wireless access. However, even the emerging fifth-generation (5G) networks may face difficulty in supporting the increased traffic demand with rigid, fixed infrastructure without substantial over-provisioning. This is particularly true for spontaneous large-scale events that require service providers to augment capacity of their networks quickly. Today, the use of aerial devices equipped with high-rate radio access capabilities has the potential to offer the much needed "on-demand" capacity boost. Conversely, it also threatens to rattle the long-standing business strategies of wireless operators, especially as the "gold rush" for cheaper millimeter wave (mmWave) spectrum lowers the market entry barriers. However, the intricate structure of this new market presently remains a mystery. This paper sheds light on competition and cooperation behavior of dissimilar aerial mmWave access suppliers, concurrently employing licensed and license-exempt frequency bands, by modeling it as a vertically differentiated market where customers have varying preferences in price and quality. To understand viable service provider strategies, we begin with constructing the Nash equilibrium for the initial market competition by employing the Bertrand and Cournot games. We then conduct a unique assessment of short-term market dynamics, where two licensed-band service providers may cooperate to improve their competition positions against the unlicensed-band counterpart intruding the market. Our unprecedented analysis studies the effects of various market interactions, price-driven demand evolution, and dynamic profit balance in this novel type of ecosystem.
  • The Device-to-Device (D2D) communication principle is a key enabler of direct localized communication between mobile nodes and is expected to propel a plethora of novel multimedia services. However, even though it offers a wide set of capabilities mainly due to the proximity and resource reuse gains, interference must be carefully controlled to maximize the achievable rate for coexisting cellular and D2D users. The scope of this work is to provide an interference-aware real-time resource allocation (RA) framework for relay-aided D2D communications that underlay cellular networks. The main objective is to maximize the overall network throughput by guaranteeing a minimum rate threshold for cellular and D2D links. To this direction, genetic algorithms (GAs) are proven to be powerful and versatile methodologies that account for not only enhanced performance but also reduced computational complexity in emerging wireless networks. Numerical investigations highlight the performance gains compared to baseline RA methods and especially in highly dense scenarios which will be the case in future 5G networks.
  • Device-to-Device (D2D) communication is expected to enable a number of new services and applications in future mobile networks and has attracted significant research interest over the last few years. Remarkably, little attention has been placed on the issue of D2D communication for users belonging to different operators. In this paper, we focus on this aspect for D2D users that belong to different tenants (virtual network operators), assuming virtualized and programmable future 5G wireless networks. Under the assumption of a cross-tenant orchestrator, we show that significant gains can be achieved in terms of network performance by optimizing resource sharing from the different tenants, i.e., slices of the substrate physical network topology. To this end, a sum-rate optimization framework is proposed for optimal sharing of the virtualized resources. Via a wide site of numerical investigations, we prove the efficacy of the proposed solution and the achievable gains compared to legacy approaches.
  • Machine-to-machine (M2M) wireless systems aim to provide ubiquitous connectivity between machine type communication (MTC) devices without any human intervention. Given the exponential growth of MTC traffic, it is of utmost importance to ensure that future wireless standards are capable of handling this traffic. In this paper, we focus on the design of a very efficient massive access strategy for highly dense cellular networks with M2M communications. Several MTC devices are allowed to simultaneously transmit at the same resource block by incorporating Raptor codes and superposition modulation. This significantly reduces the access delay and improves the achievable system throughput. A simple yet efficient random access strategy is proposed to only detect the selected preambles and the number of devices which have chosen them. No device identification is needed in the random access phase which significantly reduces the signalling overhead. The proposed scheme is analyzed and the maximum number of MTC devices that can be supported in a resource block is characterized as a function of the message length, number of available resources, and the number of preambles. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme can effectively support a massive number of MTC devices for a limited number of available resources, when the message size is small.
  • Cell association in cellular networks is an important aspect that impacts network capacity and eventually quality of experience. The scope of this work is to investigate the different and generalized cell association (CAS) strategies for Device-to-Device (D2D) communications in a cellular network infrastructure. To realize this, we optimize D2D-based cell association by using the notion of uplink and downlink decoupling that was proven to offer significant performance gains. We propose an integer linear programming (ILP) optimization framework to achieve efficient D2D cell association that minimizes the interference caused by D2D devices onto cellular communications in the uplink as well as improve the D2D resource utilization efficiency. Simulation results based on Vodafone's LTE field trial network in a dense urban scenario highlight the performance gains and render this proposal a candidate design approach for future 5G networks.
  • Millimeter wave (mmWave) links will offer high capacity but are poor at penetrating into or diffracting around solid objects. Thus, we consider a hybrid cellular network with traditional sub 6 GHz macrocells coexisting with denser mmWave small cells, where a mobile user can connect to either opportunistically. We develop a general analytical model to characterize and derive the uplink and downlink cell association in view of the SINR and rate coverage probabilities in such a mixed deployment. We offer extensive validation of these analytical results (which rely on several simplifying assumptions) with simulation results. Using the analytical results, different decoupled uplink and downlink cell association strategies are investigated and their superiority is shown compared to the traditional coupled approach. Finally, small cell biasing in mmWave is studied, and we show that unprecedented biasing values are desirable due to the wide bandwidth.
  • Prior Internet designs encompassed the fixed, mobile and lately the things Internet. In a natural evolution to these, the notion of the Tactile Internet is emerging which allows one to transmit touch and actuation in real-time. With voice and data communications driving the designs of the current Internets, the Tactile Internet will enable haptic communications, which in turn will be a paradigm shift in how skills and labor are digitally delivered globally. Design efforts for both the Tactile Internet and the underlying haptic communications are in its infancy. The aim of this article is thus to review some of the most stringent design challenges, as well as proposing first avenues for specific solutions to enable the Tactile Internet revolution.
  • Machine-to-machine (M2M) communications are expected to provide ubiquitous connectivity between machines without the need of human intervention. To support such a large number of autonomous devices, the M2M system architecture needs to be extremely power and spectrally efficient. This article thus briefly reviews the features of M2M services in the third generation (3G) long-term evolution and its advancement (LTE-Advanced) networks. Architectural enhancements are then presented for supporting M2M services in LTE-Advanced cellular networks. To increase spectral efficiency, the same spectrum is expected to be utilized for human-to-human (H2H) communications as well as M2M communications. We therefore present various radio resource allocation schemes and quantify their utility in LTE-Advanced cellular networks. System-level simulation results are provided to validate the performance effectiveness of M2M communications in LTE-Advanced cellular networks.
  • This article addresses the market-changing phenomenon of the Internet of Things (IoT), which relies on the underlying paradigm of machine-to-machine (M2M) communications to integrate a plethora of various sensors, actuators, and smart meters across a wide spectrum of businesses. The M2M landscape features today an extreme diversity of available connectivity solutions which -- due to the enormous economic promise of the IoT -- need to be harmonized across multiple industries. To this end, we comprehensively review the most prominent existing and novel M2M radio technologies, as well as share our first-hand real-world deployment experiences, with the goal to provide a unified insight into enabling M2M architectures, unique technology features, expected performance, and related standardization developments. We pay particular attention to the cellular M2M sector employing 3GPP LTE technology. This work is a systematic recollection of our many recent research, industrial, entrepreneurial, and standardization efforts within the contemporary M2M ecosystem.
  • Future machine to machine (M2M) communications need to support a massive number of devices communicating with each other with little or no human intervention. Random access techniques were originally proposed to enable M2M multiple access, but suffer from severe congestion and access delay in an M2M system with a large number of devices. In this paper, we propose a novel multiple access scheme for M2M communications based on the capacity-approaching analog fountain code to efficiently minimize the access delay and satisfy the delay requirement for each device. This is achieved by allowing M2M devices to transmit at the same time on the same channel in an optimal probabilistic manner based on their individual delay requirements. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme achieves a near optimal rate performance and at the same time guarantees the delay requirements of the devices. We further propose a simple random access strategy and characterized the required overhead. Simulation results show the proposed approach significantly outperforms the existing random access schemes currently used in long term evolution advanced (LTE-A) standard in terms of the access delay.
  • Ever since the inception of mobile telephony, the downlink and uplink of cellular networks have been coupled, i.e. mobile terminals have been constrained to associate with the same base station (BS) in both the downlink and uplink directions. New trends in network densification and mobile data usage increase the drawbacks of this constraint, and suggest that it should be revisited. In this paper we identify and explain five key arguments in favor of Downlink/Uplink Decoupling (DUDe) based on a blend of theoretical, experimental, and logical arguments. We then overview the changes needed in current (LTE-A) mobile systems to enable this decoupling, and then look ahead to fifth generation (5G) cellular standards. We believe the introduced paradigm will lead to significant gains in network throughput, outage and power consumption at a much lower cost compared to other solutions providing comparable or lower gains.
  • Our traditional notion of a cell is changing dramatically given the increasing degree of heterogeneity in 4G and emerging 5G systems. Rather than belonging to a specific cell, a device would choose the most suitable connection from the plethora of connections available. In such a setting, given the transmission powers differ significantly between downlink (DL) and uplink (UL), a wireless device that sees multiple Base Stations (BSs) may access the infrastructure in a way that it receives the downlink (DL) traffic from one BS and sends uplink (UL) traffic through another BS. This situation is referred to as Downlink and Uplink Decoupling (DUDe). In this paper, the capacity and throughput gains brought by decoupling are rigorously derived using stochastic geometry. Theoretical findings are then corroborated by means of simulation results. A further constituent of this paper is the verification of the theoretically derived results by means of a real-world system simulation platform. Despite theoretical assumptions differing from the very complete system simulator, the trends in the association probabilities and capacity gains are similar. Based on the promising results, we then outline architectural changes needed to facilitate the decoupling of DL and UL.
  • Until the 4th Generation (4G) cellular 3GPP systems, a user equipment's (UE) cell association has been based on the downlink received power from the strongest base station. Recent work has shown that - with an increasing degree of heterogeneity in emerging 5G systems - such an approach is dramatically suboptimal, advocating for an independent association of the downlink and uplink where the downlink is served by the macro cell and the uplink by the nearest small cell. In this paper, we advance prior art by explicitly considering the cell-load as well as the available backhaul capacity during the association process. We introduce a novel association algorithm and prove its superiority w.r.t. prior art by means of simulations that are based on Vodafone's small cell trial network and employing a high resolution pathloss prediction and realistic user distributions. We also study the effect that different power control settings have on the performance of our algorithm.
  • Cell association in cellular networks has traditionally been based on the downlink received signal power only, despite the fact that up and downlink transmission powers and interference levels differed significantly. This approach was adequate in homogeneous networks with macro base stations all having similar transmission power levels. However, with the growth of heterogeneous networks where there is a big disparity in the transmit power of the different base station types, this approach is highly inefficient. In this paper, we study the notion of Downlink and Uplink Decoupling (DUDe) where the downlink cell association is based on the downlink received power while the uplink is based on the pathloss. We present the motivation and assess the gains of this 5G design approach with simulations that are based on Vodafone's LTE field trial network in a dense urban area, employing a high resolution ray-tracing pathloss prediction and realistic traffic maps based on live network measurements.
  • A point-to-point wireless communication system in which the transmitter is equipped with an energy harvesting device and a rechargeable battery, is studied. Both the energy and the data arrivals at the transmitter are modeled as Markov processes. Delay-limited communication is considered assuming that the underlying channel is block fading with memory, and the instantaneous channel state information is available at both the transmitter and the receiver. The expected total transmitted data during the transmitter's activation time is maximized under three different sets of assumptions regarding the information available at the transmitter about the underlying stochastic processes. A learning theoretic approach is introduced, which does not assume any a priori information on the Markov processes governing the communication system. In addition, online and offline optimization problems are studied for the same setting. Full statistical knowledge and causal information on the realizations of the underlying stochastic processes are assumed in the online optimization problem, while the offline optimization problem assumes non-causal knowledge of the realizations in advance. Comparing the optimal solutions in all three frameworks, the performance loss due to the lack of the transmitter's information regarding the behaviors of the underlying Markov processes is quantified.
  • Experimentation is important when designing communication protocols for Wireless Sensor Networks. Lower-layers have a major impact on upper-layer performance, and the complexity of the phenomena can not be entirely captured by analysis or simulation. In this report, we go through the complete process, from designing an energy-efficient self-organizing communication architecture (MAC, routing and application layers) to real-life experimentation roll-outs. The presented communication architecture includes a MAC protocol which avoids building and maintaining neighborhood tables, and a geographically-inspired routing protocol over virtual coordinates. The application consists of a mobile sink interrogating a wireless sensor network based on the requests issued by a disconnected base station. After the design process of this architecture, we verify it functions correctly by simulation, and we perform a temporal verification. This study is needed to calculate the maximum speed the mobile sink can take. We detail the implementation, and the results of the off-site experimentation (energy consumption at PHY layer, collision probability at MAC layer, and routing). Finally, we report on the real-world deployment where we have mounted the mobile sink node on a radio-controlled airplane.