• Interfaces between crystalline materials have been an essential engineering platform for modern electronics. At the interfaces in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures, the twist-tunability offered by vdW crystals allows the construction of a quasiperiodic moir\'e superlattice of tunable length scale, leading to unprecedented access to exotic physical phenomena. However, these interfaces exhibit more intriguing structures than the simple moir\'e pattern. The vdW interaction that favors interlayer commensurability competes against the intralayer elastic lattice distortion, causing interfacial reconstruction with significant modification to the electronic structure. Here we demonstrate engineered atomic-scale reconstruction at the vdW interface between two graphene layers by controlling the twist angle. Employing transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we find local commensuration of Bernal stacked graphene within each domain, separated by incommensurate structural solitons. We observe electronic transport along the triangular network of one-dimensional (1D) topological channels as the electronic bands in the alternating domains are gapped out by a transverse electric field. The atomic scale reconstruction in a twisted vdW interface further enables engineering 2D heterostructures with continuous tunability.
  • The stacking of individual layers of two-dimensional (2D) materials can be experimentally controlled with remarkable precision on the order of $0.1^\circ$. The relative orientation of successive layers introduces variations in the electronic properties that depend sensitively on the twist angle, creating moir\'e super-lattices. Here, we use simple theoretical models and accurate electronic structure calculations to predict that the electronic density in stacked 2D layers can vary in real space in a manner that replicates features of the band-structure in momentum-space. In particular, we draw a link between these banded real space electronic structures and the complexity of exact $k \cdot p$ models in the same energy range for each material we studied. A direct consequence of the patterns is the localization of electronic states. We demonstrate this effect in graphene, a semi-metal, and MoSe$_2$, a representative material of the transition metal dichalcogenide family of semiconductors. This effect can be useful in the design of localized electronic modes, arising from layer stackings, for experimental or technological applications.
  • We demonstrate analytically and numerically that the dispersive Dirac cone emulating an epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) behavior is a universal property within a family of plasmonic crystals consisting of two-dimensional (2D) metals. Our starting point is a periodic array of 2D metallic sheets embedded in an inhomogeneous and anisotropic dielectric host that allows for propagation of transverse-magnetic (TM) polarized waves. By invoking a systematic bifurcation argument for arbitrary dielectric profiles in one spatial dimension, we show how TM Bloch waves experience an effective dielectric function that averages out microscopic details of the host medium. The corresponding effective dispersion relation reduces to a Dirac cone when the conductivity of the metallic sheet and the period of the array satisfy a critical condition for ENZ behavior. Our analytical findings are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.
  • Metastable condensed matter typically fluctuates about local energy minima at the femtosecond time scale before transitioning between local minima after nanoseconds or microseconds. This vast scale separation limits the applicability of classical molecular dynamics methods and has spurned the development of a host of approximate algorithms. One recently proposed method is diffusive molecular dynamics which aims to integrate a system of ordinary differential equations describing the likelihood of occupancy by one of two species, in the case of a binary alloy, while quasistatically evolving the locations of the atoms. While diffusive molecular dynamics has shown to be efficient and provide agreement with observations, it is fundamentally a model, with unclear connections to classical molecular dynamics. In this work, we formulate a spin-diffusion stochastic process and show how it can be connected to diffusive molecular dynamics. The spin-diffusion model couples a classical overdamped Langevin equation to a kinetic Monte Carlo model for exchange amongst the species of a binary alloy. Under suitable assumptions and approximations, spin-diffusion can be shown to lead to diffusive molecular molecular dynamics type models. The key assumptions and approximations include a well defined time scale separation, a choice of spin exchange rates, a low temperature approximation, and a mean field type approximation. We derive several models from different assumptions and show their relationship to diffusive molecular dynamics. Differences and similarities amongst the models are explored in a simple test problem.
  • The hyperbolic phonon-polaritons within the Reststrahlen band of hBN is of great interest for applications in nanophotonics as they are capable of propagating light signal with low losses over large distances. However, due to the phononic nature of the polaritons in hBN, amplitude modulation of its signal proves to be difficult and has been underexplored. In this paper we propose a broadband efficient amplitude modulator for hyperbolic rays in hBN operating in the frequency range between 1450 cm$^{-1}$ and 1550 cm$^{-1}$. The modulating region comprises a few tens of nanometers wide gap carved within the hBN slab and covered by a graphene layer, where electrostatically gated graphene serves as a mediator that facilitates the coupling between phonon-polaritons on each side of the gap through plasmonic modes within graphene. We demonstrate that such an ultra compact modulator has insertion losses as low as 3 dB and provides modulation depth varying between 14 and 20 dB within the type-II hyperbolicity region of hBN.
  • To make the investigation of electronic structure of incommensurate heterostructures computationally tractable, effective alternatives to Bloch theory must be developed. In Massatt2017, we developed and analyzed a real space scheme that exploits spatial ergodicity and near-sightedness. In the present work, we present an analogous scheme formulated in momentum space, which we prove have significant computational advantages in specific incommensurate systems of physical interest, e.g., bilayers of a specified class of materials with small rotation angles. We use our theoretical analysis to obtain estimates for improved rates of convergence with respect to total CPU time for our momentum space method that are confirmed in computational experiments.
  • We formulate and validate a finite element approach to the propagation of a slowly decaying electromagnetic wave, called surface plasmon-polariton, excited along a conducting sheet, e.g., a single-layer graphene sheet, by an electric Hertzian dipole. By using a suitably rescaled form of time-harmonic Maxwell's equations, we derive a variational formulation that enables a direct numerical treatment of the associated class of boundary value problems by appropriate curl-conforming finite elements. The conducting sheet is modeled as an idealized hypersurface with an effective electric conductivity. The requisite weak discontinuity for the tangential magnetic field across the hypersurface can be incorporated naturally into the variational formulation. We carry out numerical simulations for an infinite sheet with constant isotropic conductivity embedded in two spatial dimensions; and validate our numerics against the closed-form exact solution obtained by the Fourier transform in the tangential coordinate. Numerical aspects of our treatment such as an absorbing perfectly matched layer, as well as local refinement and a-posteriori error control are discussed.
  • By using numerical and analytical methods, we describe the generation of fine-scale lateral electromagnetic waves, called surface plasmon-polaritons (SPPs), on atomically thick, metamaterial conducting sheets in two spatial dimensions (2D). Our computations capture the two-scale character of the total field and reveal how each edge of the sheet acts as a source of an SPP that may dominate the diffracted field. We use the finite element method to numerically implement a variational formulation for a weak discontinuity of the tangential magnetic field across a hypersurface. An adaptive, local mesh refinement strategy based on a posteriori error estimators is applied to resolve the pronounced two-scale character of wave propagation and radiation over the metamaterial sheet. We demonstrate by numerical examples how a singular geometry, e.g., sheets with sharp edges, and sharp spatial changes in the associated surface conductivity may significantly influence surface plasmons in nanophotonics.
  • By formally invoking the Wiener-Hopf method, we explicitly solve a one-dimensional, singular integral equation for the excitation of a slowly decaying electromagnetic wave, called surface plasmon-polariton (SPP), of small wavelength on a semi-infinite, flat conducting sheet irradiated by a plane wave in two spatial dimensions. This setting is germane to wave diffraction by edges of large sheets of single-layer graphene. Our analytical approach includes: (i) formulation of a functional equation in the Fourier domain; (ii) evaluation of a split function, which is expressed by a contour integral and is a key ingredient of the Wiener-Hopf factorization; and (iii) extraction of the SPP as a simple-pole residue of a Fourier integral. Our analytical solution is in good agreement with a finite-element numerical computation.
  • We give an exact formulation for the transport coefficients of incommensurate two-dimensional atomic multilayer systems in the tight-binding approximation. This formulation is based upon the C* algebra framework introduced by Bellissard and collaborators to study aperiodic solids (disordered crystals, quasicrystals, and amorphous materials), notably in the presence of magnetic fields (quantum Hall effect). We also present numerical approximations and test our methods on a one-dimensional incommensurate bilayer system.
  • The ability in experiments to control the relative twist angle between successive layers in two-dimensional (2D) materials offers a new approach to manipulating their electronic properties; we refer to this approach as "twistronics". A major challenge to theory is that, for arbitrary twist angles, the resulting structure involves incommensurate (aperiodic) 2D lattices. Here, we present a general method for the calculation of the electronic density of states of aperiodic 2D layered materials, using parameter-free hamiltonians derived from ab initio density-functional theory. We use graphene, a semimetal, and MoS$_2$, a representative of the transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) family of 2D semiconductors, to illustrate the application of our method, which enables fast and efficient simulation of multi-layered stacks in the presence of local disorder and external fields. We comment on the interesting features of their Density of States (DoS) as a function of twist-angle and local configuration and on how these features can be experimentally observed.
  • We prove that the electronic density of states (DOS) for 2D incommensurate layered structures, where Bloch theory does not apply, is well-defined as the thermodynamic limit of finite clusters. In addition, we obtain an explicit representation formula for the DOS as an integral over local configurations. Next, based on this representation formula, we propose a novel algorithm for computing electronic structure properties in incommensurate heterostructures, which overcomes limitations of the common approach to artificially strain a large supercell and then apply Bloch theory.
  • Graphene and other recently developed 2D materials exhibit exceptionally strong in-plane stiffness. Relaxation of few-layer structures, either free-standing or on slightly mismatched substrates occurs mostly through out-of-plane bending and the creation of large-scale ripples. In this work, we present a novel double chain model, where we allow relaxation to occur by bending of the incommensurate coupled system of chains. As we will see, this model can be seen as a new application of the well-known Frenkel-Kontorova model for a one-dimensional atomic chain lying in a periodic potential. We focus in particular on modeling and analyzing ripples occurring in ground state configurations, as well as their numerical simulation.
  • The regular Cauchy--Born method is a useful and efficient tool for analyzing bulk properties of materials in the absence of defects. However, the method normally fails to capture surface effects, which are essential to determining material properties at small length scales. In this paper, we present a corrector method that improves upon the prediction for material behavior from the Cauchy--Born method over a small boundary layer at the surface of a 1D material by capturing the missed surface effects. We justify the separation of the problem into a bulk response and a localized surface correction by establishing an error estimate, which vanishes in the long wavelength limit.
  • We derive and interpret solutions of time-harmonic Maxwell's equations with a vertical and a horizontal electric dipole near a planar, thin conducting film, e.g. graphene sheet, lying between two unbounded isotropic and non-magnetic media. Exact expressions for all field components are extracted in terms of rapidly convergent series of known transcendental functions when the ambient media have equal permittivities and both the dipole and observation point lie on the plane of the film. These solutions are simplified for all distances from the source when the film surface resistivity is large in magnitude compared to the intrinsic impedance of the ambient space. The formulas reveal the analytical structure of two types of waves that can possibly be excited by the dipoles and propagate on the film. One of these waves is intimately related to the surface plasmon-polariton of transverse-magnetic (TM) polarization of plane waves.
  • Diffusive molecular dynamics is a novel model for materials with atomistic resolution that can reach diffusive time scales. The main ideas of diffusive molecular dynamics are to first minimize an approximate variational Gaussian free energy of the system with respect to the mean atomic coordinates (averaging over many vibrational periods), and to then to perform a diffusive step where atoms and vacancies (or two species in a binary alloy) flow on a diffusive time scale via a master equation. We present a mathematical framework for studying this algorithm based upon relative entropy, or Kullback-Leibler divergence. This adds flexibility in how the algorithm is implemented and interpreted. We then compare our formulation, relying on relative entropy and absolute continuity of measures, to existing formulations. The main difference amongst the equations appears in a model for vacancy diffusion, where additional entropic terms appear in our development.
  • We formulate and analyze an optimization-based Atomistic-to-Continuum (AtC) coupling method for problems with point defects. Near the defect core the method employs a potential-based atomistic model, which enables accurate simulation of the defect. Away from the core, where site energies become nearly independent of the lattice position, the method switches to a more efficient continuum model. The two models are merged by minimizing the mismatch of their states on an overlap region, subject to the atomistic and continuum force balance equations acting independently in their domains. We prove that the optimization problem is well-posed and establish error estimates.
  • Spatial multiscale methods have established themselves as useful tools for extending the length scales accessible by conventional statics (i.e., zero temperature molecular dynamics). Recently, extensions of these methods, such as the finite-temperature quasicontinuum (hot-QC) or Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics (CGMD) methods, have allowed for multiscale molecular dynamics simulations at finite temperature. Here, we assess the quality of the long-time dynamics these methods generate by considering canonical transition rates. Specifically, we analyze the transition state theory (TST) rates in CGMD and compare them to the corresponding TST rate of the fully atomistic system. The ability of such an approach to reliably reproduce the TST rate is verified through a relative error analysis, which is then used to highlight the major contributions to the error and guide the choice of degrees of freedom. Finally, our analytical results are compared with numerical simulations for the case of a 1-D chain.
  • The present paper aims at developing a theory of computation of crystalline defects at finite temperature. In a one-dimensional setting we introduce Gibbs distributions corresponding to such defects and rigorously establish their asymptotic expansion. We then give an example of using such asymptotic expansion to compare the accuracy of computations using the free boundary conditions and using an atomistic-to-continuum coupling method.
  • Atomistic-to-Continuum (AtC) coupling methods are a novel means of computing the properties of a discrete crystal structure, such as those containing defects, that combine the accuracy of an atomistic (fully discrete) model with the efficiency of a continuum model. In this note we extend the optimization-based AtC, formulated in arXiv:1304.4976 for linear, one-dimensional problems to multi-dimensional settings and arbitrary interatomic potentials. We conjecture optimal error estimates for the multidimensional AtC, outline an implementation procedure, and provide numerical results to corroborate the conjecture for a 1D Lennard-Jones system with next-nearest neighbor interactions.
  • We formulate an atomistic-to-continuum coupling method based on blending atomistic and continuum forces. Our precise choice of blending mechanism is informed by theoretical predictions. We present a range of numerical experiments studying the accuracy of the scheme, focusing in particular on its stability. These experiments confirm and extend the theoretical predictions, and demonstrate a superior accuracy of B-QCF over energy-based blending schemes.
  • We present a new optimization-based method for atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) coupling. The main idea is to cast the coupling of the atomistic and continuum models as a constrained optimization problem with virtual Dirichlet controls on the interfaces between the atomistic and continuum subdomains. The optimization objective is to minimize the error between the atomistic and continuum solutions on the overlap between the two subdomains, while the atomistic and continuum force balance equations provide the constraints. Splitting of the atomistic and continuum problems instead of blending them and their subsequent use as constraints in the optimization problem distinguishes our approach from the existing AtC formulations. We present and analyze the method in the context of a one-dimensional chain of atoms modeled using a linearized two-body next-nearest neighbor interactions.
  • Parallel replica dynamics is a method for accelerating the computation of processes characterized by a sequence of infrequent events. In this work, the processes are governed by the overdamped Langevin equation. Such processes spend much of their time about the minima of the underlying potential, occasionally transitioning into different basins of attraction. The essential idea of parallel replica dynamics is that the exit time distribution from a given well for a single process can be approximated by the minimum of the exit time distributions of $N$ independent identical processes, each run for only 1/N-th the amount of time. While promising, this leads to a series of numerical analysis questions about the accuracy of the exit distributions. Building upon the recent work in Le Bris et al., we prove a unified error estimate on the exit distributions of the algorithm against an unaccelerated process. Furthermore, we study a dephasing mechanism, and prove that it will successfully complete.
  • The development of consistent and stable quasicontinuum models for multi-dimensional crystalline solids remains a challenge. For example, proving stability of the force-based quasicontinuum (QCF) model remains an open problem. In 1D and 2D, we show that by blending atomistic and Cauchy--Born continuum forces (instead of a sharp transition as in the QCF method) one obtains positive-definite blended force-based quasicontinuum (B-QCF) models. We establish sharp conditions on the required blending width.
  • The accurate approximation of critical strains for lattice instability is a key criterion for predictive computational modeling of materials. In this paper, we present a comparison of the lattice stability for atomistic chains modeled by the embedded atom method (EAM) with their approximation by local Cauchy-Born models. We find that both the volume-based local model and the reconstruction-based local model can give O(1) errors for the critical strain since the embedding energy density is generally strictly convex. The critical strain predicted by the volume-based model is always larger than that predicted by the atomistic model, but the critical strain for reconstruction-based models can be either larger or smaller than that predicted by the atomistic model.