• Feedback control systems using sensors and actuators such as piezoelectric sensors and actuators, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) sensors and opto-mechanical sensors, are allowing new advances in designing such high precision technologies. The negative imaginary control systems framework allows for robust control design for such high precision systems in the face of uncertainties due to un modelled dynamics. The stability of the feedback interconnection of negative imaginary systems has been well established in the literature. However, the proofs of stability feedback interconnection which are used in some previous papers have a shortcoming due to a matrix inevitability issue. In this paper we provide a new and correct Lyapunobv-based proof of one such result and show that the result is still true.
  • Precise knowledge of an optical device's frequency response is crucial for it to be useful in most applications. Traditional methods for determining the frequency response of an optical system (e.g. optical cavity or waveguide modulator) usually rely on calibrated broadband photo-detectors or complicated RF mixdown operations. As the bandwidths of these devices continue to increase, there is a growing need for a characterization method that does not have bandwidth limitations, or require a previously calibrated device. We demonstrate a new calibration technique on an optical system (consisting of an optical cavity and a high-speed waveguide modulator) that is free from limitations imposed by detector bandwidth, and does not require a calibrated photo-detector or modulator. We use a low-frequency (DC) photo-detector to monitor the cavity's optical response as a function of modulation frequency, which is also used to determine the modulator's frequency response. Knowledge of the frequency-dependent modulation depth allows us to more precisely determine the cavity's characteristics (free spectral range and linewidth). The precision and repeatability of our technique is demonstrated by measuring the different resonant frequencies of orthogonal polarization cavity modes caused by the presence of a non-linear crystal. Once the modulator has been characterized using this simple method, the frequency response of any passive optical element can be determined.
  • Robust control design for quantum systems has been recognized as a key task in the development of practical quantum technology. In this paper, we present a systematic numerical methodology of sampling-based learning control (SLC) for control design of quantum systems with uncertainties. The SLC method includes two steps of "training" and "testing". In the training step, an augmented system is constructed using artificial samples generated by sampling uncertainty parameters according to a given distribution. A gradient flow based learning algorithm is developed to find the control for the augmented system. In the process of testing, a number of additional samples are tested to evaluate the control performance where these samples are obtained through sampling the uncertainty parameters according to a possible distribution. The SLC method is applied to three significant examples of quantum robust control including state preparation in a three-level quantum system, robust entanglement generation in a two-qubit superconducting circuit and quantum entanglement control in a two-atom system interacting with a quantized field in a cavity. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the SLC approach even when uncertainties are quite large, and show its potential for robust control design of quantum systems.
  • This paper is concerned with stability conditions for the positive feedback interconnection of negative imaginary systems. A generalization of the negative imaginary lemma is derived, which remains true even if the transfer function has poles on the imaginary axis including the origin. A sufficient condition for the internal stability of a feedback interconnection for NI systems including a pole at the origin is given and an illustrative example is presented to support the result.