• We study the proportional chore division problem where a protocol wants to divide an undesirable object, called chore, among $n$ different players. The goal is to find an allocation such that the cost of the chore assigned to each player be at most $1/n$ of the total cost. This problem is the dual variant of the cake cutting problem in which we want to allocate a desirable object. Edmonds and Pruhs showed that any protocol for the proportional cake cutting must use at least $\Omega(n \log n)$ queries in the worst case, however, finding a lower bound for the proportional chore division remained an interesting open problem. We show that chore division and cake cutting problems are closely related to each other and provide an $\Omega(n \log n)$ lower bound for chore division.
  • The edit distance between two strings is defined as the smallest number of insertions, deletions, and substitutions that need to be made to transform one of the strings to another one. Approximating edit distance in subquadratic time is "one of the biggest unsolved problems in the field of combinatorial pattern matching". Our main result is a quantum constant approximation algorithm for computing the edit distance in truly subquadratic time. More precisely, we give an $O(n^{1.858})$ quantum algorithm that approximates the edit distance within a factor of $7$. We further extend this result to an $O(n^{1.781})$ quantum algorithm that approximates the edit distance within a larger constant factor. Our solutions are based on a framework for approximating edit distance in parallel settings. This framework requires as black box an algorithm that computes the distances of several smaller strings all at once. For a quantum algorithm, we reduce the black box to \textit{metric estimation} and provide efficient algorithms for approximating it. We further show that this framework enables us to approximate edit distance in distributed settings. To this end, we provide a MapReduce algorithm to approximate edit distance within a factor of $3$, with sublinearly many machines and sublinear memory. Also, our algorithm runs in a logarithmic number of rounds.
  • The secretary and the prophet inequality problems are central to the field of Stopping Theory. Recently, there has been a lot of work in generalizing these models to multiple items because of their applications in mechanism design. The most important of these generalizations are to matroids and to combinatorial auctions (extends bipartite matching). Kleinberg-Weinberg \cite{KW-STOC12} and Feldman et al. \cite{feldman2015combinatorial} show that for adversarial arrival order of random variables the optimal prophet inequalities give a $1/2$-approximation. For many settings, however, it's conceivable that the arrival order is chosen uniformly at random, akin to the secretary problem. For such a random arrival model, we improve upon the $1/2$-approximation and obtain $(1-1/e)$-approximation prophet inequalities for both matroids and combinatorial auctions. This also gives improvements to the results of Yan \cite{yan2011mechanism} and Esfandiari et al. \cite{esfandiari2015prophet} who worked in the special cases where we can fully control the arrival order or when there is only a single item. Our techniques are threshold based. We convert our discrete problem into a continuous setting and then give a generic template on how to dynamically adjust these thresholds to lower bound the expected total welfare.
  • Graph problems are troublesome when it comes to MapReduce. Typically, to be able to design algorithms that make use of the advantages of MapReduce, assumptions beyond what the model imposes, such as the {\em density} of the input graph, are required. In a recent shift, a simple and robust model of MapReduce for graph problems, where the space per machine is set to be $O(|V|)$ has attracted considerable attention. We term this model {\em semi-MapReduce}, or in short, semi-MPC, and focus on its computational power. In this short note, we show through a set of simulation methods that semi-MPC is, perhaps surprisingly, almost equivalent to the congested clique model of distributed computing. However, semi-MPC, in addition to round complexity, incorporates another practically important dimension to optimize: the number of machines. Furthermore, we show that algorithms in other distributed computing models, such as CONGEST, can be simulated to run in the same number of rounds of semiMPC while also using an optimal number of machines. We later show the implications of these simulation methods by obtaining improved algorithms for these models using the recent algorithms that have been developed.
  • We study the problem of fair allocation for indivisible goods. We use the the maxmin share paradigm introduced by Budish as a measure for fairness. Procaccia and Wang (EC'14) were first to investigate this fundamental problem in the additive setting. In contrast to what real-world experiments suggest, they show that a maxmin guarantee (1-MMS allocation) is not always possible even when the number of agents is limited to 3. While the existence of an approximation solution (e.g. a $1/2$-MMS allocation) is quite straightforward, improving the guarantee becomes subtler for larger constants. Procaccia provide a proof for existence of a $2/3$-MMS allocation and leave the question open for better guarantees. Our main contribution is an answer to the above question. We improve the result of [Procaccia and Wang] to a $3/4$ factor in the additive setting. The main idea for our $3/4$-MMS allocation method is clustering the agents. To this end, we introduce three notions and techniques, namely reducibility, matching allocation, and cycle-envy-freeness, and prove the approximation guarantee of our algorithm via non-trivial applications of these techniques. Our analysis involves coloring and double counting arguments that might be of independent interest. One major shortcoming of the current studies on fair allocation is the additivity assumption on the valuations. We alleviate this by extending our results to the case of submodular, fractionally subadditive, and subadditive settings. More precisely, we give constant approximation guarantees for submodular and XOS agents, and a logarithmic approximation for the case of subadditive agents. Furthermore, we complement our results by providing close upper bounds for each class of valuation functions. Finally, we present algorithms to find such allocations for additive, submodular, and XOS settings in polynomial time.
  • An ever-important issue is protecting infrastructure and other valuable targets from a range of threats from vandalism to theft to piracy to terrorism. The "defender" can rarely afford the needed resources for a 100% protection. Thus, the key question is, how to provide the best protection using the limited available resources. We study a practically important class of security games that is played out in space and time, with targets and "patrols" moving on a real line. A central open question here is whether the Nash equilibrium (i.e., the minimax strategy of the defender) can be computed in polynomial time. We resolve this question in the affirmative. Our algorithm runs in time polynomial in the input size, and only polylogarithmic in the number of possible patrol locations (M). Further, we provide a continuous extension in which patrol locations can take arbitrary real values. Prior work obtained polynomial-time algorithms only under a substantial assumption, e.g., a constant number of rounds. Further, all these algorithms have running times polynomial in M, which can be very large.
  • In this paper, we study a stochastic variant of the celebrated k-server problem. In the k-server problem, we are required to minimize the total movement of k servers that are serving an online sequence of t requests in a metric. In the stochastic setting we are given t independent distributions <P_1, P_2,..., P_t> in advance, and at every time step i a request is drawn from Pi. Designing the optimal online algorithm in such setting is NP-hard, therefore the emphasis of our work is on designing an approximately optimal online algorithm. We first show a structural characterization for a certain class of non-adaptive online algorithms. We prove that in general metrics, the best of such algorithms has a cost of no worse than three times that of the optimal online algorithm. Next, we present an integer program that finds the optimal algorithm of this class for any arbitrary metric. Finally, by rounding the solution of the linear relaxation of this program, we present an online algorithm for the stochastic k-server problem with the approximation factor of 3 in the line and circle metrics and O(log n) in a general metric of size n. Moreover, we define the Uber problem, in which each demand consists of two endpoints, a source and a destination. We show that given an a-approximation algorithm for the k-server problem, we can obtain an (a+2)-approximation algorithm for the Uber problem. Motivated by the fact that demands are usually highly correlated with the time we study the stochastic Uber problem. Furthermore, we extend our results to the correlated setting where the probability of a request arriving at a certain point depends not only on the time step but also on the previously arrived requests.
  • Hill and Kertz studied the prophet inequality on iid distributions [The Annals of Probability 1982]. They proved a theoretical bound of $1-\frac{1}{e}$ on the approximation factor of their algorithm. They conjectured that the best approximation factor for arbitrarily large n is $\frac{1}{1+1/e} \approx 0.731$. This conjecture remained open prior to this paper for over 30 years. In this paper we present a threshold-based algorithm for the prophet inequality with n iid distributions. Using a nontrivial and novel approach we show that our algorithm is a 0.738-approximation algorithm. By beating the bound of $\frac{1}{1+1/e}$, this refutes the conjecture of Hill and Kertz. Moreover, we generalize our results to non-iid distributions and discuss its applications in mechanism design.
  • We design the first online algorithm with poly-logarithmic competitive ratio for the edge-weighted degree-bounded Steiner forest(EW-DB-SF) problem and its generalized variant. We obtain our result by demonstrating a new generic approach for solving mixed packing/covering integer programs in the online paradigm. In EW-DB-SF we are given an edge-weighted graph with a degree bound for every vertex. Given a root vertex in advance we receive a sequence of terminal vertices in an online manner. Upon the arrival of a terminal we need to augment our solution subgraph to connect the new terminal to the root. The goal is to minimize the total weight of the solution while respecting the degree bounds on the vertices. In the offline setting edge-weighted degree-bounded Steiner tree (EW-DB-ST) and its many variations have been extensively studied since early eighties. Unfortunately the recent advancements in the online network design problems are inherently difficult to adapt for degree-bounded problems. In contrast in this paper we obtain our result by using structural properties of the optimal solution, and reducing the EW-DB-SF problem to an exponential-size mixed packing/covering integer program in which every variable appears only once in covering constraints. We then design a generic integral algorithm for solving this restricted family of IPs. We demonstrate a new technique for solving mixed packing/covering integer programs. Define the covering frequency k of a program as the maximum number of covering constraints in which a variable can participate. Let m denote the number of packing constraints. We design an online deterministic integral algorithm with competitive ratio of O(k log m) for the mixed packing/covering integer programs. We believe this technique can be used as an interesting alternative for the standard primal-dual techniques in solving online problems.
  • We initiate the study of degree-bounded network design problems in the online setting. The degree-bounded Steiner tree problem { which asks for a subgraph with minimum degree that connects a given set of vertices { is perhaps one of the most representative problems in this class. This paper deals with its well-studied generalization called the degree-bounded Steiner forest problem where the connectivity demands are represented by vertex pairs that need to be individually connected. In the classical online model, the input graph is given online but the demand pairs arrive sequentially in online steps. The selected subgraph starts off as the empty subgraph, but has to be augmented to satisfy the new connectivity constraint in each online step. The goal is to be competitive against an adversary that knows the input in advance. We design a simple greedy-like algorithm that achieves a competitive ratio of O(log n) where n is the number of vertices. We show that no (randomized) algorithm can achieve a (multiplicative) competitive ratio o(log n); thus our result is asymptotically tight. We further show strong hardness results for the group Steiner tree and the edge-weighted variants of degree-bounded connectivity problems. Fourer and Raghavachari resolved the online variant of degree-bounded Steiner forest in their paper in SODA'92. Since then, the natural family of degree-bounded network design problems has been extensively studied in the literature resulting in the development of many interesting tools and numerous papers on the topic. We hope that our approach in this paper, paves the way for solving the online variants of the classical problems in this family of network design problems.
  • We study fair allocation of indivisible goods to agents with unequal entitlements. Fair allocation has been the subject of many studies in both divisible and indivisible settings. Our emphasis is on the case where the goods are indivisible and agents have unequal entitlements. This problem is a generalization of the work by Procaccia and Wang wherein the agents are assumed to be symmetric with respect to their entitlements. Although Procaccia and Wang show an almost fair (constant approximation) allocation exists in their setting, our main result is in sharp contrast to their observation. We show that, in some cases with $n$ agents, no allocation can guarantee better than $1/n$ approximation of a fair allocation when the entitlements are not necessarily equal. Furthermore, we devise a simple algorithm that ensures a $1/n$ approximation guarantee. Our second result is for a restricted version of the problem where the valuation of every agent for each good is bounded by the total value he wishes to receive in a fair allocation. Although this assumption might seem w.l.o.g, we show it enables us to find a $1/2$ approximation fair allocation via a greedy algorithm. Finally, we run some experiments on real-world data and show that, in practice, a fair allocation is likely to exist. We also support our experiments by showing positive results for two stochastic variants of the problem, namely stochastic agents and stochastic items.
  • We study the problem of computing Nash equilibria of zero-sum games. Many natural zero-sum games have exponentially many strategies, but highly structured payoffs. For example, in the well-studied Colonel Blotto game (introduced by Borel in 1921), players must divide a pool of troops among a set of battlefields with the goal of winning (i.e., having more troops in) a majority. The Colonel Blotto game is commonly used for analyzing a wide range of applications from the U.S presidential election, to innovative technology competitions, to advertisement, to sports. However, because of the size of the strategy space, standard methods for computing equilibria of zero-sum games fail to be computationally feasible. Indeed, despite its importance, only a few solutions for special variants of the problem are known. In this paper we show how to compute equilibria of Colonel Blotto games. Moreover, our approach takes the form of a general reduction: to find a Nash equilibrium of a zero-sum game, it suffices to design a separation oracle for the strategy polytope of any bilinear game that is payoff-equivalent. We then apply this technique to obtain the first polytime algorithms for a variety of games. In addition to Colonel Blotto, we also show how to compute equilibria in an infinite-strategy variant called the General Lotto game; this involves showing how to prune the strategy space to a finite subset before applying our reduction. We also consider the class of dueling games, first introduced by Immorlica et al. (2011). We show that our approach provably extends the class of dueling games for which equilibria can be computed: we introduce a new dueling game, the matching duel, on which prior methods fail to be computationally feasible but upon which our reduction can be applied.
  • In the Colonel Blotto game, which was initially introduced by Borel in 1921, two colonels simultaneously distribute their troops across different battlefields. The winner of each battlefield is determined independently by a winner-take-all rule. The ultimate payoff of each colonel is the number of battlefields he wins. This game is commonly used for analyzing a wide range of applications such as the U.S presidential election, innovative technology competitions, advertisements, etc. There have been persistent efforts for finding the optimal strategies for the Colonel Blotto game. After almost a century Ahmadinejad, Dehghani, Hajiaghayi, Lucier, Mahini, and Seddighin provided a poly-time algorithm for finding the optimal strategies. They first model the problem by a Linear Program (LP) and use Ellipsoid method to solve it. However, despite the theoretical importance of their algorithm, it is highly impractical. In general, even Simplex method (despite its exponential running-time) performs better than Ellipsoid method in practice. In this paper, we provide the first polynomial-size LP formulation of the optimal strategies for the Colonel Blotto game. We use linear extension techniques. Roughly speaking, we project the strategy space polytope to a higher dimensional space, which results in a lower number of facets for the polytope. We use this polynomial-size LP to provide a novel, simpler and significantly faster algorithm for finding the optimal strategies for the Colonel Blotto game. We further show this representation is asymptotically tight in terms of the number of constraints. We also extend our approach to multi-dimensional Colonel Blotto games, and implement our algorithm to observe interesting properties of Colonel Blotto; for example, we observe the behavior of players in the discrete model is very similar to the previously studied continuous model.
  • We study competition in a general framework introduced by Immorlica et al. and answer their main open question. Immorlica et al. considered classic optimization problems in terms of competition and introduced a general class of games called dueling games. They model this competition as a zero-sum game, where two players are competing for a user's satisfaction. In their main and most natural game, the ranking duel, a user requests a webpage by submitting a query and players output an ordering over all possible webpages based on the submitted query. The user tends to choose the ordering which displays her requested webpage in a higher rank. The goal of both players is to maximize the probability that her ordering beats that of her opponent and gets the user's attention. Immorlica et al. show this game directs both players to provide suboptimal search results. However, they leave the following as their main open question: "does competition between algorithms improve or degrade expected performance?" In this paper, we resolve this question for the ranking duel and a more general class of dueling games. More precisely, we study the quality of orderings in a competition between two players. This game is a zero-sum game, and thus any Nash equilibrium of the game can be described by minimax strategies. Let the value of the user for an ordering be a function of the position of her requested item in the corresponding ordering, and the social welfare for an ordering be the expected value of the corresponding ordering for the user. We propose the price of competition which is the ratio of the social welfare for the worst minimax strategy to the social welfare obtained by a social planner. We use this criterion for analyzing the quality of orderings in the ranking duel. We prove the quality of minimax results is surprisingly close to that of the optimum solution.
  • In this paper we consider two special cases of the "cover-by-pairs" optimization problem that arise when we need to place facilities so that each customer is served by two facilities that reach it by disjoint shortest paths. These problems arise in a network traffic monitoring scheme proposed by Breslau et al. and have potential applications to content distribution. The "set-disjoint" variant applies to networks that use the OSPF routing protocol, and the "path-disjoint" variant applies when MPLS routing is enabled, making better solutions possible at the cost of greater operational expense. Although we can prove that no polynomial-time algorithm can guarantee good solutions for either version, we are able to provide heuristics that do very well in practice on instances with real-world network structure. Fast implementations of the heuristics, made possible by exploiting mathematical observations about the relationship between the network instances and the corresponding instances of the cover-by-pairs problem, allow us to perform an extensive experimental evaluation of the heuristics and what the solutions they produce tell us about the effectiveness of the proposed monitoring scheme. For the set-disjoint variant, we validate our claim of near-optimality via a new lower-bounding integer programming formulation. Although computing this lower bound requires solving the NP-hard Hitting Set problem and can underestimate the optimal value by a linear factor in the worst case, it can be computed quickly by CPLEX, and it equals the optimal solution value for all the instances in our extensive testbed.
  • We introduce a new technique for designing fixed-parameter algorithms for cut problems, namely randomized contractions. We apply our framework to obtain the first FPT algorithm for the Unique Label Cover problem and new FPT algorithms with exponential speed up for the Steiner Cut and Node Multiway Cut-Uncut problems. More precisely, we show the following: - We prove that the parameterized version of the Unique Label Cover problem, which is the base of the Unique Games Conjecture, can be solved in 2^{O(k^2\log |\Sigma|)}n^4\log n deterministic time (even in the stronger, vertex-deletion variant) where k is the number of unsatisfied edges and |\Sigma| is the size of the alphabet. As a consequence, we show that one can in polynomial time solve instances of Unique Games where the number of edges allowed not to be satisfied is upper bounded by O(\sqrt{\log n}) to optimality, which improves over the trivial O(1) upper bound. - We prove that the Steiner Cut problem can be solved in 2^{O(k^2\log k)}n^4\log n deterministic time and \tilde{O}(2^{O(k^2\log k)}n^2) randomized time where k is the size of the cutset. This result improves the double exponential running time of the recent work of Kawarabayashi and Thorup (FOCS'11). - We show how to combine considering `cut' and `uncut' constraints at the same time. More precisely, we define a robust problem Node Multiway Cut-Uncut that can serve as an abstraction of introducing uncut constraints, and show that it admits an algorithm running in 2^{O(k^2\log k)}n^4\log n deterministic time where k is the size of the cutset. To the best of our knowledge, the only known way of tackling uncut constraints was via the approach of Marx, O'Sullivan and Razgon (STACS'10), which yields algorithms with double exponential running time. An interesting aspect of our technique is that, unlike important separators, it can handle real weights.
  • Given an edge-weighted directed graph $G=(V,E)$ on $n$ vertices and a set $T=\{t_1, t_2, \ldots, t_p\}$ of $p$ terminals, the objective of the \scss ($p$-SCSS) problem is to find an edge set $H\subseteq E$ of minimum weight such that $G[H]$ contains an $t_{i}\rightarrow t_j$ path for each $1\leq i\neq j\leq p$. In this paper, we investigate the computational complexity of a variant of $2$-SCSS where we have demands for the number of paths between each terminal pair. Formally, the \sharinggeneral problem is defined as follows: given an edge-weighted directed graph $G=(V,E)$ with weight function $\omega: E\rightarrow \mathbb{R}^{\geq 0}$, two terminal vertices $s, t$, and integers $k_1, k_2$ ; the objective is to find a set of $k_1$ paths $F_1, F_2, \ldots, F_{k_1}$ from $s\leadsto t$ and $k_2$ paths $B_1, B_2, \ldots, B_{k_2}$ from $t\leadsto s$ such that $\sum_{e\in E} \omega(e)\cdot \phi(e)$ is minimized, where $\phi(e)= \max \Big\{|\{i\in [k_1] : e\in F_i\}|\ ,\ |\{j\in [k_2] : e\in B_j\}|\Big\}$. For each $k\geq 1$, we show the following: The \sharing problem can be solved in $n^{O(k)}$ time. A matching lower bound for our algorithm: the \sharing problem does not have an $f(k)\cdot n^{o(k)}$ algorithm for any computable function $f$, unless the Exponential Time Hypothesis (ETH) fails. Our algorithm for \sharing relies on a structural result regarding an optimal solution followed by using the idea of a "token game" similar to that of Feldman and Ruhl. We show with an example that the structural result does not hold for the \sharinggeneral problem if $\min\{k_1, k_2\}\geq 2$. Therefore \sharing is the most general problem one can attempt to solve with our techniques.
  • Optimal stopping theory is a powerful tool for analyzing scenarios such as online auctions in which we generally require optimizing an objective function over the space of stopping rules for an allocation process under uncertainty. Perhaps the most classic problems of stopping theory are the prophet inequality problem and the secretary problem. The classical prophet inequality states that by choosing the same threshold OPT/2 for every step, one can achieve the tight competitive ratio of 0.5. On the other hand, for the basic secretary problem, the optimal strategy achieves the tight competitive ratio of 1/e. In this paper, we introduce Prophet Secretary, a natural combination of the prophet inequality and the secretary problems. An example motivation for our problem is as follows. Consider a seller that has an item to sell on the market to a set of arriving customers. The seller knows the types of customers that may be interested in the item and he has a price distribution for each type: the price offered by a customer of a type is anticipated to be drawn from the corresponding distribution. However, the customers arrive in a random order. Upon the arrival of a customer, the seller makes an irrevocable decision whether to sell the item at the offered price. We address the question of finding a strategy for selling the item at a high price. We show that by using a uniform threshold one cannot break the 0.5 barrier. However, we show that i) using n distinct non-adaptive thresholds one can obtain a competitive ratio that goes to (1-1/e) as n grows; and ii) no online algorithm can achieve a competitive ratio better than 0.75. Our results improve the (asymptotic) approximation guarantee of single-item sequential posted pricing mechanisms from 0.5 to (1-1/e) when the order of agents (customers) is chosen randomly.
  • Recently [Bhattacharya et al., STOC 2015] provide the first non-trivial algorithm for the densest subgraph problem in the streaming model with additions and deletions to its edges, i.e., for dynamic graph streams. They present a $(0.5-\epsilon)$-approximation algorithm using $\tilde{O}(n)$ space, where factors of $\epsilon$ and $\log(n)$ are suppressed in the $\tilde{O}$ notation. However, the update time of this algorithm is large. To remedy this, they also provide a $(0.25-\epsilon)$-approximation algorithm using $\tilde{O}(n)$ space with update time $\tilde{O}(1)$. In this paper we improve the algorithms by Bhattacharya et al. by providing a $(1-\epsilon)$-approximation algorithm using $\tilde{O}(n)$ space. Our algorithm is conceptually simple - it samples $\tilde{O}(n)$ edges uniformly at random, and finds the densest subgraph on the sampled graph. We also show how to perform this sampling with update time $\tilde{O}(1)$. In addition to this, we show that given oracle access to the edge set, we can implement our algorithm in time $\tilde{O}(n)$ on a graph in the standard RAM model. To the best of our knowledge this is the fastest $(0.5-\epsilon)$-approximation algorithm for the densest subgraph problem in the RAM model given such oracle access. Further, we extend our results to a general class of graph optimization problems that we call heavy subgraph problems. This class contains many interesting problems such as densest subgraph, directed densest subgraph, densest bipartite subgraph, $d$-cut and $d$-heavy connected component. Our result, by characterizing heavy subgraph problems, partially addresses open problem 13 at the IITK Workshop on Algorithms for Data Streams in 2006 regarding the effects of subsampling in this context.
  • We study the problem of selling $n$ items to a single buyer with an additive valuation function. We consider the valuation of the items to be correlated, i.e., desirabilities of the buyer for the items are not drawn independently. Ideally, the goal is to design a mechanism to maximize the revenue. However, it has been shown that a revenue optimal mechanism might be very complicated and as a result inapplicable to real-world auctions. Therefore, our focus is on designing a simple mechanism that achieves a constant fraction of the optimal revenue. Babaioff et al. propose a simple mechanism that achieves a constant fraction of the optimal revenue for independent setting with a single additive buyer. However, they leave the following problem as an open question: "Is there a simple, approximately optimal mechanism for a single additive buyer whose value for $n$ items is sampled from a common base-value distribution?" Babaioff et al. show a constant approximation factor of the optimal revenue can be achieved by either selling the items separately or as a whole bundle in the independent setting. We show a similar result for the correlated setting when the desirabilities of the buyer are drawn from a common base-value distribution. It is worth mentioning that the core decomposition lemma which is mainly the heart of the proofs for efficiency of the mechanisms does not hold for correlated settings. Therefore we propose a modified version of this lemma which is applicable to the correlated settings as well. Although we apply this technique to show the proposed mechanism can guarantee a constant fraction of the optimal revenue in a very weak correlation, this method alone can not directly show the efficiency of the mechanism in stronger correlations.
  • An instance of the Connected Maximum Cut problem consists of an undirected graph G = (V, E) and the goal is to find a subset of vertices S $\subseteq$ V that maximizes the number of edges in the cut \delta(S) such that the induced graph G[S] is connected. We present the first non-trivial \Omega(1/log n) approximation algorithm for the connected maximum cut problem in general graphs using novel techniques. We then extend our algorithm to an edge weighted case and obtain a poly-logarithmic approximation algorithm. Interestingly, in stark contrast to the classical max-cut problem, we show that the connected maximum cut problem remains NP-hard even on unweighted, planar graphs. On the positive side, we obtain a polynomial time approximation scheme for the connected maximum cut problem on planar graphs and more generally on graphs with bounded genus.
  • Online advertising is the main source of revenue for many Internet firms. A central component of online advertising is the underlying mechanism that selects and prices the winning ads for a given ad slot. In this paper we study designing a mechanism for the Combinatorial Auction with Identical Items (CAII) in which we are interested in selling $k$ identical items to a group of bidders each demanding a certain number of items between $1$ and $k$. CAII generalizes important online advertising scenarios such as image-text and video-pod auctions [GK14]. In image-text auction we want to fill an advertising slot on a publisher's web page with either $k$ text-ads or a single image-ad and in video-pod auction we want to fill an advertising break of $k$ seconds with video-ads of possibly different durations. Our goal is to design truthful mechanisms that satisfy Revenue Monotonicity (RM). RM is a natural constraint which states that the revenue of a mechanism should not decrease if the number of participants increases or if a participant increases her bid. [GK14] showed that no deterministic RM mechanism can attain PoRM of less than $\ln(k)$ for CAII, i.e., no deterministic mechanism can attain more than $\frac{1}{\ln(k)}$ fraction of the maximum social welfare. [GK14] also design a mechanism with PoRM of $O(\ln^2(k))$ for CAII. In this paper, we seek to overcome the impossibility result of [GK14] for deterministic mechanisms by using the power of randomization. We show that by using randomization, one can attain a constant PoRM. In particular, we design a randomized RM mechanism with PoRM of $3$ for CAII.
  • In this paper we present a simple but powerful subgraph sampling primitive that is applicable in a variety of computational models including dynamic graph streams (where the input graph is defined by a sequence of edge/hyperedge insertions and deletions) and distributed systems such as MapReduce. In the case of dynamic graph streams, we use this primitive to prove the following results: -- Matching: First, there exists an $\tilde{O}(k^2)$ space algorithm that returns an exact maximum matching on the assumption the cardinality is at most $k$. The best previous algorithm used $\tilde{O}(kn)$ space where $n$ is the number of vertices in the graph and we prove our result is optimal up to logarithmic factors. Our algorithm has $\tilde{O}(1)$ update time. Second, there exists an $\tilde{O}(n^2/\alpha^3)$ space algorithm that returns an $\alpha$-approximation for matchings of arbitrary size. (Assadi et al. (2015) showed that this was optimal and independently and concurrently established the same upper bound.) We generalize both results for weighted matching. Third, there exists an $\tilde{O}(n^{4/5})$ space algorithm that returns a constant approximation in graphs with bounded arboricity. -- Vertex Cover and Hitting Set: There exists an $\tilde{O}(k^d)$ space algorithm that solves the minimum hitting set problem where $d$ is the cardinality of the input sets and $k$ is an upper bound on the size of the minimum hitting set. We prove this is optimal up to logarithmic factors. Our algorithm has $\tilde{O}(1)$ update time. The case $d=2$ corresponds to minimum vertex cover. Finally, we consider a larger family of parameterized problems (including $b$-matching, disjoint paths, vertex coloring among others) for which our subgraph sampling primitive yields fast, small-space dynamic graph stream algorithms. We then show lower bounds for natural problems outside this family.
  • Given a graph $G$ and an integer $k$, the Feedback Vertex Set (FVS) problem asks if there is a vertex set $T$ of size at most $k$ that hits all cycles in the graph. The fixed-parameter tractability status of FVS in directed graphs was a long-standing open problem until Chen et al. (STOC '08) showed that it is FPT by giving a $4^{k}k!n^{O(1)}$ time algorithm. In the subset versions of this problems, we are given an additional subset $S$ of vertices (resp., edges) and we want to hit all cycles passing through a vertex of $S$ (resp. an edge of $S$). Recently, the Subset Feedback Vertex Set in undirected graphs was shown to be FPT by Cygan et al. (ICALP '11) and independently by Kakimura et al. (SODA '12). We generalize the result of Chen et al. (STOC '08) by showing that Subset Feedback Vertex Set in directed graphs can be solved in time $2^{O(k^3)}n^{O(1)}$. By our result, we complete the picture for feedback vertex set problems and their subset versions in undirected and directed graphs. Besides proving the fixed-parameter tractability of Directed Subset Feedback Vertex Set, we reformulate the random sampling of important separators technique in an abstract way that can be used for a general family of transversal problems. Moreover, we modify the probability distribution used in the technique to achieve better running time; in particular, this gives an improvement from $2^{2^{O(k)}}$ to $2^{O(k^2)}$ in the parameter dependence of the Directed Multiway Cut algorithm of Chitnis et al. (SODA '12).
  • Cournot competition is a fundamental economic model that represents firms competing in a single market of a homogeneous good. Each firm tries to maximize its utility---a function of the production cost as well as market price of the product---by deciding on the amount of production. In today's dynamic and diverse economy, many firms often compete in more than one market simultaneously, i.e., each market might be shared among a subset of these firms. In this situation, a bipartite graph models the access restriction where firms are on one side, markets are on the other side, and edges demonstrate whether a firm has access to a market or not. We call this game \emph{Network Cournot Competition} (NCC). In this paper, we propose algorithms for finding pure Nash equilibria of NCC games in different situations. First, we carefully design a potential function for NCC, when the price functions for markets are linear functions of the production in that market. However, for nonlinear price functions, this approach is not feasible. We model the problem as a nonlinear complementarity problem in this case, and design a polynomial-time algorithm that finds an equilibrium of the game for strongly convex cost functions and strongly monotone revenue functions. We also explore the class of price functions that ensures strong monotonicity of the revenue function, and show it consists of a broad class of functions. Moreover, we discuss the uniqueness of equilibria in both of these cases which means our algorithms find the unique equilibria of the games. Last but not least, when the cost of production in one market is independent from the cost of production in other markets for all firms, the problem can be separated into several independent classical \emph{Cournot Oligopoly} problems. We give the first combinatorial algorithm for this widely studied problem.