• The ESSENCE survey discovered 213 Type Ia supernovae at redshifts 0.1 < z < 0.81 between 2002 and 2008. We present their R and I-band photometry, measured from images obtained using the MOSAIC II camera at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope, along with rapid-response spectroscopy for each object. We use our spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine an accurate, quantitative classification and a precise redshift. Through an extensive calibration program we have improved the precision of the CTIO Blanco natural photometric system. We use several empirical metrics to measure our internal photometric consistency and our absolute calibration of the survey. We assess the effect of various potential sources of systematic bias on our measured fluxes, and we estimate that the dominant term in the systematic error budget from the photometric calibration on our absolute fluxes is ~1%.
  • We present well-sampled optical observations of the bright Type Ia supernova (SN~Ia) SN 2011fe in M101. Our data, starting from $\sim16$ days before maximum light and extending to $\sim463$ days after maximum, provide an unprecedented time series of spectra and photometry for a normal SN~Ia. Fitting the early-time rising light curve, we find that the luminosity evolution of SN 2011fe follows a $t^n$ law, with the index $n$ being close to 2.0 in the $VRI$ bands but slightly larger in the $U$ and $B$ bands. Combining the published ultraviolet (UV) and near-infrared (NIR) photometry, we derive the contribution of UV/NIR emission relative to the optical. SN 2011fe is found to have stronger UV emission and reaches its UV peak a few days earlier than other SNe~Ia with similar $\Delta m_{15}(B)$, suggestive of less trapping of high-energy photons in the ejecta. Moreover, the $U$-band light curve shows a notably faster decline at late phases ($t\approx 100$--300 days), which also suggests that the ejecta may be relatively transparent to UV photons. These results favor the notion that SN 2011fe might have a progenitor system with relatively lower metallicity. On the other hand, the early-phase spectra exhibit prominent high-velocity features (HVFs) of O~I $\lambda$7773 and the Ca~II~NIR triplet, but only barely detectable in Si~II~6355. This difference can be caused either by an ionization/temperature effect or an abundance enhancement scenario for the formation of HVFs; it suggests that the photospheric temperature of SN 2011fe is intrinsically low, perhaps owing to incomplete burning during the explosion of the white dwarf.
  • We study a sample of 23 Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), all observed with the same set of instruments. Analysis of their photometric evolution confirms that their typical plateau duration is 100 days with little scatter, showing a tendency to get shorter for more energetic SNe. The rise time from explosion to plateau does not seem to correlate with luminosity. We analyze their spectra, measuring typical ejecta velocities, and confirm that they follow a well behaved power-law decline. We find indications of high-velocity material in the spectra of six of our SNe. We test different dust extinction correction methods by asking the following -- does the uniformity of the sample increase after the application of a given method? A reasonably behaved underlying distribution should become tighter after correction. No method we tested made a significant improvement.
  • The nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) 2011fe and 2011by had nearly identical photospheric phase optical spectra, light-curve widths, and photometric colours, but at peak brightness SN 2011by reached a fainter absolute magnitude in all optical bands and exhibited lower flux in the near-ultraviolet (NUV). Based on those data, Foley & Kirshner (2013) argue that the progenitors of SNe 2011by and 2011fe were supersolar and subsolar, respectively, and that SN 2011fe generated 1.7 times the amount of 56Ni as SN 2011by. With this work, we extend the comparison of these SNe Ia to 10 days before and 300 days after maximum brightness with new spectra and photometry. We show that the nebular phase spectra of SNe 2011fe and 2011by are almost identical, and do not support a factor of 1.7 difference in 56Ni mass. Instead, we find it plausible that the Tully-Fisher distance for SN 2011by is an underestimate, in which case these SNe Ia may have reached similar peak luminosity, formed similar amounts of 56Ni, and had lower metallicity progenitors than previously estimated. Regardless of the true distance to SN 2011by, we find that the relative progenitor metallicity difference remains well supported by their disparity in NUV flux, which we show to be even stronger at pre-maximum epochs --- although contributions from differences in total ejecta mass, viewing angle, or progenitor density cannot be ruled out. We also demonstrate that, independent of distance modulus, SN 2011by exhibits a late-time luminosity excess that cannot be explained by a light echo, but is more likely to be the result of greater energy trapping by the nucleosynthetic products of SN 2011by.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2005hk and SN 2008A, typical members of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe). Here we focus on late-time observations, where these objects deviate most dramatically from all other SN types. Instead of the dominant nebular emission lines that are observed in other SNe at late phases, spectra of SNe 2005hk and 2008A show lines of Fe II, Ca II, and Fe I more than a year past maximum light, along with narrow [Fe II] and [Ca II] emission. We use spectral features to constrain the temperature and density of the ejecta, and find high densities at late times, with n_e >~ 10^9 cm^-3. Such high densities should yield enhanced cooling of the ejecta, making these objects good candidates to observe the expected "infrared catastrophe," a generic feature of SN Ia models. However, our HST photometry of SN 2008A does not match the predictions of an infrared catastrophe. Moreover, our HST observations rule out a "complete deflagration" that fully disrupts the white dwarf for these peculiar SNe, showing no evidence for unburned material at late times. Deflagration explosion models that leave behind a bound remnant can match some of the observed properties of SNe Iax, but no published model is consistent with all of our observations of SNe 2005hk and 2008A.
  • We use a sample of 58 low-redshift (z <= 0.03) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) having well-sampled light curves and spectra near maximum light to examine the behaviour of high-velocity features (HVFs) in SN Ia spectra. We take advantage of the fact that Si II 6355 is free of HVFs at maximum light in all SNe Ia, allowing us to quantify the strength of HVFs by comparing the structure of these two lines. We find that the average HVF strength increases with decreasing light-curve decline rate, and rapidly declining SNe Ia (dm_15(B) >= 1.4 mag) show no HVFs in their maximum-light spectra. Comparison of HVF strength to the light-curve colour of the SNe Ia in our sample shows no evidence of correlation. We find a correlation of HVF strength with the velocity of Si II 6355 at maximum light (v_Si), such that SNe Ia with lower v_Si have stronger HVFs, while those SNe Ia firmly in the "high-velocity" (i.e., v_Si >= 12,000 km/s) subclass exhibit no HVFs in their maximum-light spectra. While v_Si and dm_15(B) show no correlation in the full sample of SNe Ia, we find a significant correlation between these quantities in the subset of SNe Ia having weak HVFs. In general, we find that slowly declining (low dm_15(B)) SNe Ia, which are more luminous and more energetic than average SNe Ia, tend to produce either high photospheric ejecta velocities (i.e., high v_Si) or strong HVFs at maximum light, but not both. Finally, we examine the evolution of HVF strength for a sample of SNe Ia having extensive pre-maximum spectroscopic coverage and find significant diversity of the pre-maximum HVF behaviour.
  • We present a cosmological analysis of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) photometry sample introduced by Ganeshalingam et al. (2010). These SNe provide an effective anchor point to estimate cosmological parameters when combined with datasets at higher redshift. The data presented by Ganeshalingam et al. (2010) have been rereduced in the natural system of the KAIT and Nickel telescopes to minimise systematic uncertainties. We have run the light-curve-fitting software SALT2 on our natural-system light curves to measure light-curve parameters for LOSS light curves and available SN Ia datasets in the literature. We present a Hubble diagram of 586 SNe in the redshift range z=0.01-1.4 with a residual scatter of 0.176 mag. Of the 226 low-z objects in our sample, 91 objects are from LOSS, including 45 SNe without previously published distances. Assuming a flat Universe, we find that the best fit for the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -0.86^+0.13_-0.16 (stat) +- 0.11 (sys) from SNe alone, consistent with a cosmological constant. Our data prefer a Universe with an accelerating rate of expansion with 99.999% confidence. When looking at Hubble residuals as a function of host-galaxy morphology, we do not see evidence for a significant trend, although we find a somewhat reduced scatter in Hubble residuals from SNe residing within a projected distance < 10 kpc of the host-galaxy nucleus (\sigma = 0.156 mag). We find that Hubble residuals do not correlate with the expansion velocity of Si II \lambda 6355 measured in optical spectra near maximum light. Our data are consistent with no presence of a local "Hubble bubble." Improvements in cosmological analyses within low-z samples can be achieved by better constraining calibration uncertainties in the zero points of photometric systems.
  • Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) are a rare (< 10%) subclass of core-collapse SNe that exhibit relatively narrow emission lines from a dense, pre-existing circumstellar medium (CSM). In 2009, a warm Spitzer survey observed 30 SNe IIn discovered in 2003 - 2008 and detected 10 SNe at distances out to 175 Mpc with unreported late-time infrared emission, in some cases more than 5 years post-discovery. For this single epoch of data, the warm-dust parameters suggest the presence of a radiative heating source consisting of optical/X-ray emission continuously generated by ongoing CSM interaction. Here we present multi-wavelength follow-up observations of this sample of 10 SNe IIn and the well-studied Type IIn SN 2010jl. A recent epoch of Spitzer observations reveals ongoing mid-infrared emission from nine of the SNe in this sample. We also detect three of the SNe in archival WISE data, in addition to SNe 1987A, 2004dj, and 2008iy. For at least five of the SNe in the sample, optical and/or X-ray emission confirms the presence of radiative emission from ongoing CSM interaction. The two Spitzer nondetections are consistent with the forward shock overrunning and destroying the dust shell, a result that places upper limits on the dust-shell size. The optical and infrared observations confirm the radiative heating model and constrain a number of model parameters, including progenitor mass-loss characteristics. All of the SNe in this sample experienced an outburst on the order of tens to hundreds of years prior to the SN explosion followed by periods of less intense mass loss. Although all evidence points to massive progenitors, the variation in the data highlights the diversity in SN IIn progenitor evolution. While these observations do not identify a particular progenitor system, they demonstrate that future, coordinated, multi-wavelength campaigns can constrain theoretical mass-loss models.
  • We present photometry and spectroscopy of the Type IIn supernova (SN) 2011ht, identified previously as a SN impostor. The light curve exhibits an abrupt transition from a well-defined ~120 day plateau to a steep bolometric decline. Leading up to peak brightness, a hot emission-line spectrum exhibits signs of interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), in the form of relatively narrow P-Cygni features of H I and He I superimposed on broad Lorentzian wings. For the remainder of the plateau phase the spectrum exhibits strengthening P-Cygni profiles of Fe II, Ca II, and H-alpha. By day 147, after the plateau has ended, the SN entered the nebular phase, heralded by the appearance of forbidden transitions of [O I], [O II], and [Ca II] over a weak continuum. At this stage, the light curve exhibits a low luminosity that is comparable to that sub-luminous Type II-P supernovae, and a relatively fast visual-wavelength decline that is significantly steeper than the Co-56 decay rate. However, the total bolometric decline, including the IR luminosity, is consistent with Co-56 decay, and implies a low Ni-56 mass of ~0.01 M(Sun). We therefore characterize SN 2011ht as a bona-fide core-collapse SN very similar to the peculiar SNe IIn 1994W and 2009kn. These three SNe define a subclass, which are Type IIn based on their spectrum, but that also exhibit well-defined plateaus and produce low Ni-56 yields. We therefore suggest Type IIn-P as a name for this subclass. Possible progenitors of SNe IIn-P, consistent with the available data, include 8-10 M(Sun) stars, which undergo core collapse as a result of electron capture after a brief phase of enhanced mass loss, or more massive M>25 M(Sun) progenitors, which experience substantial fallback of the metal-rich radioactive ejecta. In either case, the energy radiated by these three SNe during their plateau must be dominated by CSM interaction (abridged).
  • In this work we analyse late-time (t > 100 d) optical spectra of low-redshift (z < 0.1) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) which come mostly from the Berkeley Supernova Ia Program dataset. We also present spectra of SN 2011by for the first time. The BSNIP sample studied consists of 34 SNe Ia with 60 nebular spectra, to which we add nebular spectral feature measurements of 20 SNe Ia from previously published work (Maeda et al. 2011; Blondin et al. 2012), representing the largest set of late-time SN Ia spectra ever analysed. The full width at half-maximum intensity (FWHM) and velocities of the [Fe III] {\lambda}4701, [Fe II] {\lambda}7155, and [Ni II] {\lambda}7378 emission features are measured in most observations of spectroscopically normal objects where the data have signal-to-noise ratios >20 px^-1 and are older than 160 d past maximum brightness. The velocities of all three features are seen to be relatively constant with time, increasing only a few to ~20 km/s/d. The nebular velocity (v_neb, calculated by taking the average of the [Fe II] {\lambda}7155 and [Ni II] {\lambda}7378 velocities) is correlated with the near-maximum-brightness velocity gradient and early-time ejecta velocity. Nearly all high velocity gradient objects have redshifted nebular lines while most low velocity gradient objects have blueshifted nebular lines. No correlation is found between v_neb and {\Delta}m_15(B), and for a given light-curve shape there is a large range of observed nebular velocities. The data also indicate a correlation between observed (B-V)_max and v_neb.
  • On 2012 May 17.2 UT, only 1.5 +/- 0.2 d after explosion, we discovered SN 2012cg, a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in NGC 4424 (d ~ 15 Mpc). As a result of the newly modified strategy employed by the Lick Observatory SN Search, a sequence of filtered images was obtained starting 161 s after discovery. Utilizing recent models describing the interaction of SN ejecta with a companion star, we rule out a ~1 M_Sun companion for half of all viewing angles and a red-giant companion for nearly all orientations. SN 2012cg reached a B-band maximum of 12.09 +/- 0.02 mag on 2012 June 2.0 and took ~17.3 d from explosion to reach this, typical for SNe Ia. Our pre-maximum brightness photometry shows a narrower-than-average B-band light curve for SN 2012cg, though slightly overluminous at maximum brightness and with normal color evolution (including some of the earliest SN Ia filtered photometry ever obtained). Spectral fits to SN 2012cg reveal ions typically found in SNe Ia at early times, with expansion velocities >14,000 km/s at 2.5 d past explosion. Absorption from C II is detected early, as well as high-velocity components of both Si II 6355 Ang. and Ca II. Our last spectrum (13.5 d past explosion) resembles that of the somewhat peculiar SN Ia 1999aa. This suggests that SN 2012cg will have a slower-than-average declining light curve, which may be surprising given the faster-than-average rising light curve.
  • In this first paper in a series we present 1298 low-redshift (z\leq0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 through 2008 as part of the Berkeley SN Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have a typical wavelength range of 3300-10,400 Ang., roughly twice as wide as spectra from most previously published datasets. We present our observing and reduction procedures, and we describe the resulting SN Database (SNDB), which will be an online, public, searchable database containing all of our fully reduced spectra and companion photometry. In addition, we discuss our spectral classification scheme (using the SuperNova IDentification code, SNID; Blondin & Tonry 2007), utilising our newly constructed set of SNID spectral templates. These templates allow us to accurately classify our entire dataset, and by doing so we are able to reclassify a handful of objects as bona fide SNe Ia and a few other objects as members of some of the peculiar SN Ia subtypes. In fact, our dataset includes spectra of nearly 90 spectroscopically peculiar SNe Ia. We also present spectroscopic host-galaxy redshifts of some SNe Ia where these values were previously unknown. [Abridged]
  • In this third paper in a series we compare spectral feature measurements to photometric properties of 108 low-redshift (z < 0.1) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with optical spectra within 5 d of maximum brightness. We find the pseudo-equivalent width (pEW) of the Si II 4000 line to be a good indicator of light-curve width, and the pEWs of the Mg II and Fe II complexes are relatively good proxies for SN colour. We also employ a combination of light-curve parameters (specifically the SALT2 stretch and colour parameters x_1 and c, respectively) and spectral measurements to calculate distance moduli. The residuals from these models are then compared to the standard model which uses only light-curve stretch and colour. Our investigations show that a distance model that uses x_1, c, and the velocity of the Si II 6355 feature does not lead to a decrease in the Hubble residuals. We also find that distance models with flux ratios alone or in conjunction with light-curve information rarely perform better than the standard (x_1,c) model. However, when adopting a distance model which combines the ratio of fluxes near ~3750 Ang. and ~4550 Ang. with both x_1 and c, the Hubble residuals are decreased by ~10 per cent, which is found to be significant at about the 2-sigma level. The weighted root-mean-square of the residuals using this model is 0.130 +/- 0.017 mag (as compared with 0.144 +/- 0.019 mag when using the same sample with the standard model). This Hubble diagram fit has one of the smallest scatters ever published and at the highest significance ever seen in such a study. Finally, these results are discussed with regard to how they can improve the cosmological accuracy of future, large-scale SN Ia surveys. [Abridged]
  • We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the peculiar Type IIn/Ibn supernova SN2011hw. Its light curve exhibits a slower decline rate than normal SNeIbc, with a peak absolute magnitude of -19.5 (unfiltered) and a secondary peak of -18.3 mag (R). Spectra of SN2011hw are unusual compared to normal SN types, most closely resembling the spectra of SNeIbn. We center our analysis on comparing SN 2011hw to the well-studied TypeIbn SN2006jc. While the two SNe have many important similarities, the differences are quite telling: compared to SN2006jc, SN2011hw has weaker HeI and CaII lines and relatively stronger H lines, its light curve has a higher luminosity and slower decline rate, and emission lines associated with the progenitor's CSM are narrower. One can reproduce the unusual continuum shape of SN2011hw with equal contributions of a 6000K blackbody and a spectrum of SN2006jc. We attribute this emission component and many other differences between the two SNe to extra opacity from a small amount of additional H in SN2011hw, analogous to the small H mass that makes SNeIIb differ from SNeIb. Slower speeds in the CSM and elevated H content suggest a connection between the progenitor of SN2011hw and the class of Ofpe/WN9 stars, which have been associated with LBVs in their hot quiescent phases between outbursts, and are H-poor - but not H-free like classical Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. We conclude that the similarities and differences between SN2011hw and SN2006jc can be largely understood if their progenitors exploded at different points in the transitional evolution from an LBV to a WR star.
  • SN 2002es is a peculiar subluminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) with a combination of observed characteristics never before seen in a SN Ia. At maximum light, SN 2002es shares spectroscopic properties with the underluminous SN 1991bg subclass of SNe Ia, but with substantially lower expansion velocities (~6000 km/s) more typical of the SN 2002cx subclass. Photometrically, SN 2002es differs from both SN 1991bg-like and SN 2002cx-like supernovae. Although at maximum light it is subluminous (M_B=-17.78 mag), SN 2002es has a relatively broad light curve (Dm15(B)=1.28 +/- 0.04 mag), making it a significant outlier in the light-curve width vs. luminosity relationship. We estimate a 56Ni mass of 0.17 +/- 0.05 M_sun synthesized in the explosion, relatively low for a SN Ia. One month after maximum light, we find an unexpected plummet in the bolometric luminosity. The late-time decay of the light curves is inconsistent with our estimated 56Ni mass, indicating that either the light curve was not completely powered by 56Ni decay or the ejecta became optically thin to gamma-rays within a month after maximum light. The host galaxy is classified as an S0 galaxy with little to no star formation, indicating the progenitor of SN 2002es is likely from an old stellar population. We also present a less extensive dataset for SN 1999bh, an object which shares similar observed properties. Both objects were found as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, allowing us to estimate that these objects should account for ~2.5% of SNe Ia within a fixed volume. We find that current theoretical models are unable to explain the observed of characteristics of SN 2002es.
  • From the first two seasons of the Palomar Transient Factory, we identify three peculiar transients (PTF09dav, PTF10iuv, PTF11bij) with five distinguishing characteristics: peak luminosity in the gap between novae and supernovae (M_R = 15.5 to -16.5), rapid photometric evolution (rise-time ~12--15 days), large photospheric velocities (~6000 to 11000 km/s), early spectroscopic evolution into nebular phase (~1 to 3 months) and peculiar nebular spectra dominated by Calcium. We also culled the extensive decade-long Lick Observatory Supernova Search database and identified an additional member of this group, SN 2007ke. Our choice of photometric and spectroscopic properties was motivated by SN 2005E (Perets et al. 2010). To our surprise, as in the case of SN 2005E, all four members of this group are also clearly offset from the bulk of their host galaxy. Given the well-sampled early and late-time light curves, we derive ejecta masses in the range of 0.4--0.7 Msun. Spectroscopically, we find that there may be a diversity in the photospheric phase, but the commonality is in the unusual nebular spectra. Our extensive follow-up observations rule out standard thermonuclear and standard core-collapse explosions for this class of "Calcium-rich gap" transients. If the progenitor is a white dwarf, we are likely seeing a detonation of the white dwarf core and perhaps, even shockfront interaction with a previously ejected nova shell. In the less likely scenario of a massive star progenitor, a very non-standard channel specific to a low-metallicity environment needs to be invoked (e.g., ejecta fallback leading to black hole formation). Detection (or lack thereof) of a faint underlying host (dwarf galaxy, cluster) will provide a crucial and decisive diagnostic to choose between these alternatives.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SNe) serve as a fundamental pillar of modern cosmology, owing to their large luminosity and a well-defined relationship between light-curve shape and peak brightness. The precision distance measurements enabled by SNe Ia first revealed the accelerating expansion of the universe, now widely believed (though hardly understood) to require the presence of a mysterious "dark" energy. General consensus holds that Type Ia SNe result from thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf (WD) in a binary system; however, little is known of the precise nature of the companion star and the physical properties of the progenitor system. Here we make use of extensive historical imaging obtained at the location of SN 2011fe/PTF11kly, the closest SN Ia discovered in the digital imaging era, to constrain the visible-light luminosity of the progenitor to be 10-100 times fainter than previous limits on other SN Ia progenitors. This directly rules out luminous red giants and the vast majority of helium stars as the mass-donating companion to the exploding white dwarf. Any evolved red companion must have been born with mass less than 3.5 times the mass of the Sun. These observations favour a scenario where the exploding WD of SN 2011fe/PTF11kly, accreted matter either from another WD, or by Roche-lobe overflow from a subgiant or main-sequence companion star.
  • We present an analysis of the B-band and V-band rise-time distributions of nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We use a two-stretch template-fitting method to measure the rise and decline of BV light curves. Our analysis of 61 SNe with high-quality light curves indicates that the longer the time between explosion and maximum light (i.e., the rise time), the slower the decline of the light curve after maximum. However, SNe with slower post-maximum decline rates have a faster rise than would be expected from a single-parameter family of light curves, indicating that SN Ia light curves are not a single-parameter family of varying widths. Comparison of the B-band rise-time distribution for spectroscopically normal SNe Ia to those exhibiting high-velocity spectral features indicates that high-velocity (HV) SNe Ia have shorter B-band rise times compared to their spectroscopically normal counterparts. After normalising the B-band light curves to Dm15(B)= 1.1 mag (i.e., correcting the post-maximum decline to have the same shape as our template), we find that spectroscopically normal SNe Ia have a rise time of 18.03 +/- 0.24 d, while HV SNe have a faster B-band rise time of 16.63 +/- 0.29 d. Despite differences in the B band, we find that HV and normal SNe Ia have similar rise times in the V band. The initial rise of a SN Ia B-band light curve follows a power law with index 2.20 +0.27 -0.19, consistent with a parabolic rise in flux predicted by an expanding fireball toy model. We compare our early-time B-band data to models for the predicted signature of companion interaction arising from the single-degenerate progenitor scenario. There is a substantial degree of degeneracy between the adopted power-law index of the SN light-curve template, the rise time, and the amount of shock emission required to match the data.
  • We present optical and near-infrared photometry, as well as ground-based optical spectra and Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra, of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2001ay. At maximum light the Si II and Mg II lines indicated expansion velocities of 14,000 km/sec, while Si III and S II showed velocities of 9,000 km/sec There is also evidence for some unburned carbon at 12,000 km/sec. SN 2001ay exhibited a decline-rate parameter Delta m_15(B) = 0.68 \pm 0.05 mag; this and the B-band photometry at t > +25 d past maximum make it the most slowly declining Type Ia SN yet discovered. Three of four super-Chandrasekhar-mass candidates have decline rates almost as slow as this. After correction for Galactic and host-galaxy extinction, SN 2001ay had M_B = -19.19 and M_V = -19.17 mag at maximum light; thus, it was not overluminous in optical bands. In near-infrared bands it was overluminous only at the 2-sigma level at most. For a rise time of 18 d (explosion to bolometric maximum) the implied Ni-56 yield was (0.58 \pm 0.15)/alpha M_Sun, with alpha = L_max/E_Ni probably in the range 1.0 to 1.2. The Ni-56 yield is comparable to that of many Type Ia supernovae. The "normal" Ni-56 yield and the typical peak optical brightness suggest that the very broad optical light curve is explained by the trapping of the gamma rays in the inner regions.
  • The vast majority of Type II supernovae (SNe) are produced by red supergiants (RSGs), but SN 1987A revealed that blue supergiants (BSGs) can produce members of this class as well, albeit with some peculiar properties. This best studied event revolutionized our understanding of SNe, and linking it to the bulk of Type II events is essential. We present here optical photometry and spectroscopy gathered for SN 2000cb, which is clearly not a standard Type II SN and yet is not a SN 1987A analog. The light curve of SN 2000cb is reminiscent of that of SN 1987A in shape, with a slow rise to a late optical peak, but on substantially different time scales. Spectroscopically, SN 2000cb resembles a normal SN II but with ejecta velocities that far exceed those measured for SN 1987A or normal SNe II, above 18000 km/s for H-alpha at early times. The red colours, high velocities, late photometric peak, and our modeling of this object all point toward a scenario involving the high-energy explosion of a small-radius star, most likely a BSG, producing 0.1 solar masses of Ni-56. Adding a similar object to the sample, SN 2005ci, we derive a rate of about 2% of the core-collapse rate for this loosely defined class of BSG explosions.
  • We present ultraviolet (UV) and optical photometry of 26 Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) observed from March 2005 to March 2008 with the NASA {\it Swift} Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT). The dataset consists of 2133 individual observations, making it by far the most complete study of the UV emission from SNe~Ia to date. Grouping the SNe into three subclasses as derived from optical observations, we investigate the evolution of the colors of these SNe, finding a high degree of homogeneity within the normal subclass, but dramatic differences between that group and the subluminous and SN 2002cx-like groups. For the normal events, the redder UV filters on UVOT ($u$, $uvw1$) show more homogeneity than do the bluer UV filters ($uvm2$, $uvw2$). Searching for purely UV characteristics to determine existing optically based groupings, we find the peak width to be a poor discriminant, but we do see a variation in the time delay between peak emission and the late, flat phase of the light curves. The UV light curves peak a few days before the $B$ band for most subclasses (as was previously reported by Jha et al. 2006a), although the SN 2002cx-like objects peak at a very early epoch in the UV. That group also features the bluest emission observed among SNe~Ia. As the observational campaign is ongoing, we discuss the critical times to observe, as determined by this study, in order to maximize the scientific output of future observations.
  • Analyses of supernovae (SNe) have revealed two main types of progenitors: exploding white dwarfs and collapsing massive stars. We present SN2002bj, which stands out as different from any SN reported to date. Its light curve rises and declines very rapidly, yet reaches a peak intrinsic brightness greater than -18 mag. A spectrum obtained 7 days after discovery shows the presence of helium and intermediate-mass elements, yet no clear hydrogen or iron-peak elements. The spectrum only barely resembles that of a Type Ia supernova, with added carbon and helium. Its properties suggest that SN2002bj may be representative of a class of progenitors that previously has been only hypothesized: a helium detonation on a white dwarf, ejecting a small envelope of material. New surveys should find many such objects, despite their scarcity.
  • Recent observations have revealed that some Type Ia supernovae exhibit narrow, time-variable Na I D absorption features. The origin of the absorbing material is controversial, but it may suggest the presence of circumstellar gas in the progenitor system prior to the explosion, with significant implications for the nature of the supernova progenitors. We present the third detection of such variable absorption, based on six epochs of high-resolution spectroscopy of the Type Ia supernova SN 2007le from Keck and the HET. The data span ~3 months, from 5 days before maximum light to 90 days after maximum. We find that one component of the Na D absorption lines strengthened significantly with time, indicating a total column density increase of ~2.5 x 10^12 cm^-2. The changes are most prominent after maximum light rather than at earlier times when the UV flux from the SN peaks. As with SN 2006X, we detect no change in the Ca II H&K lines over the same time period, rendering line-of-sight effects improbable and suggesting a circumstellar origin for the absorbing material. Unlike the previous two SNe exhibiting variable absorption, SN 2007le is not highly reddened (E_B-V = 0.27 mag), also pointing toward circumstellar rather than interstellar absorption. Photoionization models show that the data are consistent with a dense (10^7 cm^-3) cloud or clouds of gas located ~0.1 pc from the explosion. These results broadly support the single-degenerate scenario previously proposed to explain the variable absorption, with mass loss from a nondegenerate companion star responsible for providing the circumstellar gas. We also present tentative evidence for narrow Halpha emission associated with the SN, which will require followup observations at late times to confirm. [abridged]
  • Here we present previously unpublished optical spectra of supernova (SN) 2001ig, a Type IIb SN, from about a week after explosion until nearly one year later. The earliest spectrum consists of only a few broad absorption features, but soon more common Type II SN features including hydrogen P-Cygni profiles and helium absorption become apparent. At later times, as the H features fade and the He I absorption becomes more prominent, we observe the SN to transition from a Type II to a Type Ib. Finally, observations after 250 days past explosion show a nebular-phase SN spectrum with one of the largest magnesium to oxygen intensity ratios ever seen. Additionally, we present models of the late-time spectra which indicate that the inner ejecta consist of ~1.15 M_sun of material, most of which (by mass) is in the form of oxygen, with ~0.13 M_sun of Ni-56 and essentially no hydrogen.
  • We present visual-wavelength photometry and spectroscopy of supernova SN2008S. Based on the low peak luminosity for a SN of M_R = -13.9 mag, photometric and spectral evolution unlike that of low-luminosity SNe, a late-time decline rate slower than 56Co decay, and slow outflow speeds of 600-1000 km/s, we conclude that SN2008S is not a true core-collapse SN and is probably not an electron-capture SN. Instead, we show that SN2008S more closely resembles a "SN impostor" event like SN1997bs, analogous to the giant eruptions of LBVs. Its total radiated energy was 1e47.8 ergs, and it may have ejected 0.05-0.2 Msun in the event. We discover an uncanny similarity between the spectrum of SN 2008S and that of the Galactic hypergiant IRC+10420, which is dominated by narrow H-alpha, [Ca II], and Ca II emission lines formed in an opaque wind. We propose a scenario where the vastly super-Eddington wind of SN2008S partly fails because of reduced opacity due to recombination, as suggested for IRC+10420. The range of initial masses susceptible to eruptive LBV-like mass loss was known to extend down to 20-25 Msun, but estimates for the progenitor of SN2008S (and the similar NGC300 transient) may extend this range to around 15 Msun. As such, SN2008S may have implications for the progenitor of SN1987A.