• Proteins are an important class of biomolecules that serve as essential building blocks of the cells. Their three-dimensional structures are responsible for their functions. In this thesis we have investigated the protein structures using a network theoretical approach. While doing so we used a coarse-grained method, viz., complex network analysis. We model protein structures at two length scales as Protein Contact Networks (PCN) and as Long-range Interaction Networks (LINs). We found that proteins by virtue of being characterised by high amount of clustering, are small-world networks. Apart from the small-world nature, we found that proteins have another general property, viz., assortativity. This is an interesting and exceptional finding as all other complex networks (except for social networks) are known to be disassortative. Importantly, we could identify one of the major topological determinant of assortativity by building appropriate controls.
  • The mechanical properties of DNA play a critical role in many biological functions. For example, DNA packing in viruses involves confining the viral genome in a volume (the viral capsid) with dimensions that are comparable to the DNA persistence length. Similarly, eukaryotic DNA is packed in DNA-protein complexes (nucleosomes) in which DNA is tightly bent around protein spools. DNA is also tightly bent by many proteins that regulate transcription, resulting in a variation in gene expression that is amenable to quantitative analysis. In these cases, DNA loops are formed with lengths that are comparable to or smaller than the DNA persistence length. The aim of this review is to describe the physical forces associated with tightly bent DNA in all of these settings and to explore the biological consequences of such bending, as increasingly accessible by single-molecule techniques.