• We present the design and methods of the COS-Halos survey, a systematic investigation of the gaseous halos of 44 z = 0.15-0.35 galaxies using background QSOs observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. This survey has yielded 39 spectra of z_em ~ 0.5 QSOs with S/N ~ 10-15 per resolution element. The QSO sightlines pass within 150 physical kpc of the galaxies, which span early and late types over stellar mass log M* / Msun= 9.5 - 11.5. We find that the CGM exhibits strong HI, averaging 1 Ang in Lya equivalent width out to 150 kpc, with 100% covering fraction for star-forming galaxies and 75% covering for passive galaxies. We find good agreement in column densities between this survey and previous studies over similar range of impact parameter. There is weak evidence for a difference between early- and late-type galaxies in the strength and distribution of HI. Kinematics indicate that the detected material is bound to the host galaxy, such that >~90% of the detected column density is confined within +/-200 km s^-1 of the galaxies. This material generally exists well below the halo virial temperatures at T<~ 10^5 K. We evaluate a number of possible origin scenarios for the detected material, and in the end favor a simple model in which the bulk of the detected HI arises in a bound, cool, low-density photoionized diffuse medium that is generic to all L* galaxies and may harbor a total gaseous mass comparable to galactic stellar masses.
  • We present the equivalent width and column density measurements for low and intermediate ionization states of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding 44 low-z, L ~ L* galaxies drawn from the COS-Halos survey. These measurements are derived from far-UV transitions observed in HST/COS and Keck/HIRES spectra of background quasars within an impact parameter R < 160 kpc to the targeted galaxies. The data show significant metal-line absorption for 33 of the 44 galaxies, including quiescent systems, revealing the common occurance of a cool (T ~ 10^{4 - 5} K), metal-enriched CGM. The detection rates and column densities derived for these metal lines decrease with increasing impact parameter, a trend we interpret as a declining metal surface density profile for the CGM. A comparison of the relative column densities of adjacent ionization states indicates the gas is predominantly ionized. The large surface density in metals demands a large reservoir of metals and gas in the cool CGM (very conservatively, M_ CGMcool > 10^9 MSun), which likely traces a distinct density and/or temperature regime from the highly-ionized CGM traced by OVI absorption. The large dispersion in absorption strengths (including non-detections) suggests the cool CGM traces a wide range of densities or a mix of local ionizing conditions. Lastly, the kinematics inferred from the metal-line profiles are consistent with the cool CGM being bound to the dark matters halos hosting the galaxies; this gas may serve as fuel for future star-formation. Future work will leverage this dataset to provide estimates on the mass, metallicity, dynamics, and origin of the cool CGM in low-z, L* galaxies.
  • The Shear TEsting Programme (STEP) is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of weak lensing measurement, in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. We review sixteen current and emerging shear measurement methods in a common language, and assess their performance by running them (blindly) on simulated images that contain a known shear signal. We determine the common features of algorithms that most successfully recover the input parameters. We achieve previously unattained discriminatory precision in our analysis, via a combination of more extensive simulations, and pairs of galaxy images that have been rotated with respect to each other, thus removing noise from their intrinsic ellipticities. The robustness of our simulation approach is also confirmed by testing the relative calibration of methods on real data. Weak lensing measurement has improved since the first STEP paper. Several methods now consistently achieve better than 2% precision, and are still being developed. However, the simulations can now distinguish all methods from perfect performance. Our main concern continues to be the potential for a multiplicative shear calibration bias: not least because this can not be internally calibrated with real data. We determine which galaxy populations are responsible and, by adjusting the simulated observing conditions, we also investigate the effects of instrumental and atmospheric parameters. We have isolated several previously unrecognised aspects of galaxy shape measurement, in which focussed development could provide further progress towards the sub-percent level of precision desired for future surveys. [ABRIDGED]
  • We present a comparison of barstrength Qb and circumnuclear dust morphology for 75 galaxies in order to investigate how bars affect the centers of galaxies. We trace the circumnuclear dust morphology and amount of dust structure with structure maps generated from visible-wavelength HST data, finding that tightly wound nuclear dust spirals are primarily found in weakly barred galaxies. While strongly barred galaxies sometimes exhibit grand design structure within the central 10 percent of D25, this structure rarely extends to within ~10 pc of the galaxy nucleus. In some galaxies, these spiral arms terminate at a circumnuclear starburst ring. Galaxies with circumnuclear rings are generally more strongly barred than galaxies lacking rings. Within these rings, the dust structure is fairly smooth and usually in the form of a loosely wound spiral. These data demonstrate that multiple nuclear morphologies are possible in the most strongly barred galaxies: chaotic central dust structure inconsistent with a coherent nuclear spiral, a grand design spiral that loses coherence before reaching the nucleus, or a grand design spiral that ends in a circumnuclear ring. These observations may indicate that not all strong bars are equally efficient at fueling material to the centers of their host galaxies. Finally, we investigate the longstanding hypothesis that SB(s) galaxies have weak bars and SB(r) galaxies have strong bars, finding the opposite to be the case: namely, SB(r) galaxies are less strongly barred and have less dust structure than SB(s) galaxies. In general, more strongly barred galaxies tend to have higher nuclear dust contrast.