• We study the core mass function (CMF) of the massive protocluster G286.21+0.17 with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array via 1.3~mm continuum emission at a resolution of 1.0\arcsec\ (2500~au). We have mapped a field of 5.3\arcmin$\times$5.3\arcmin\ centered on the protocluster clump. We measure the CMF in the central region, exploring various core detection algorithms, which give source numbers ranging from 60 to 125, depending on parameter selection. We estimate completeness corrections due to imperfect flux recovery and core identification via artificial core insertion experiments. For masses $M\gtrsim1\:M_\odot$, the fiducial dendrogram-identified CMF can be fit with a power law of the form ${\rm{d}}N/{\rm{d}}{\rm{log}}M\propto{M}^{-\alpha}$ with $\alpha \simeq1.24\pm0.17$, slightly shallower than, but still consistent with, the index of the Salpeter stellar initial mass function of 1.35. Clumpfind-identified CMFs are significantly shallower with $\alpha\simeq0.64\pm0.13$. While raw CMFs show a peak near $1\:M_\odot$, completeness-corrected CMFs are consistent with a single power law extending down to $\sim 0.5\:M_\odot$, with only a tentative indication of a shallowing of the slope around $\sim1\:M_\odot$. We discuss the implications of these results for star and star cluster formation theories.
  • Context. Using observations to deduce dust properties, grain size distribution, and physical conditions in molecular clouds is a highly degenerate problem. Aims. The coreshine phenomenon, a scattering process at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m that dominates absorption, has revealed its ability to explore the densest parts of clouds. We want to use this effect to constrain the dust parameters. The goal is to investigate to what extent grain growth (at constant dust mass) inside molecular clouds is able to explain the coreshine observations. We aim to find dust models that can explain a sample of Spitzer coreshine data. We also look at the consistency with near-infrared data we obtained for a few clouds. Methods. We selected four regions with a very high occurrence of coreshine cases: Taurus-Perseus, Cepheus, Chameleon and L183/L134. We built a grid of dust models and investigated the key parameters to reproduce the general trend of surface bright- nesses and intensity ratios of both coreshine and near-infrared observations with the help of a 3D Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. The grid parameters allow to investigate the effect of coagulation upon spherical grains up to 5 $\mu$m in size derived from the DustEm diffuse interstellar medium grains. Fluffiness (porosity or fractal degree), ices, and a handful of classical grain size distributions were also tested. We used the near- and mostly mid-infrared intensity ratios as strong discriminants between dust models. Results. The determination of the background field intensity at each wavelength is a key issue. In particular, an especially strong background field explains why we do not see coreshine in the Galactic plane at 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m. For starless cores, where detected, the observed 4.5 $\mu$m / 3.6 $\mu$m coreshine intensity ratio is always lower than $\sim$0.5 which is also what we find in the models for the Taurus-Perseus and L183 directions. Embedded sources can lead to higher fluxes (up to four times greater than the strongest starless core fluxes) and higher coreshine ratios (from 0.5 to 1.1 in our selected sample). Normal interstellar radiation field conditions are sufficient to find suitable grain models at all wavelengths for starless cores. The standard interstellar grains are not able to reproduce observations and, due to the multi-wavelength approach, only a few grain types meet the criteria set by the data. Porosity does not affect the flux ratios while the fractal dimension helps to explain coreshine ratios but does not seem able to reproduce near-infrared observations without a mix of other grain types. Conclusions. Combined near- and mid-infrared wavelengths confirm the potential to reveal the nature and size distribution of dust grains. Careful assessment of the environmental parameters (interstellar and background fields, embedded or nearby reddened sources) is required to validate this new diagnostic.
  • We present a new method to determine the age spread of resolved stellar populations in a starburst cluster. The method relies on a two-step process. In the first step, kinematic members of the cluster are identified based on multi-epoch astrometric monitoring. In the second step, a Bayesian analysis is carried out, comparing the observed photometric sequence of cluster members with sets of theoretical isochrones. When applying this methodology to optical and near-infrared high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and adaptive optics observations of the ~5 Myr old starburst cluster Westerlund 1 and ~2 Myr old starburst cluster NGC 3603 YC, we derive upper limits for the age spreads of 0.4 and 0.1 Myr, respectively. The results strongly suggest that star formation in these starburst clusters happened almost instantaneously.
  • The Rapid Burster (MXB 1730-335) is a unique object, showing both type I and type II X-ray bursts. A type I burst of the Rapid Burster was observed with Swift/XRT on 2009 March 5, showing photospheric radius expansion for the first time in this source. We report here on the mass and radius determination from this photospheric radius expansion burst using a Bayesian approach. After marginalization over the likely distance of the system (5.8-10 kpc) we obtain M=1.1+/-0.3 M_sun and R=9.6+/-1.5 km (1-sigma uncertainties) for the compact object, ruling out the stiffest equations of state for the neutron star. We study the sensitivity of the results to the distance, the color correction factor, and the hydrogen mass fraction in the envelope. We find that only the distance plays a crucial role.
  • Context. Westerlund I is the richest young cluster currently known in our Galaxy, making it one of the most massive clusters for which we can resolve the individual stars even in the crowded centre. This makes it an ideal target to assess whether massive clusters formed currently will remain bound or will disperse and contribute significantly to the stellar field population. Aims. Here we report a measurement of the radial velocity dispersion of Westerlund I to explore whether the cluster is currently in virial equilibrium, if it is in the process of collapse or if it is expanding and dispersing into the field. Methods. We obtained MIKE/Magellan high resolution optical spectra of 22 post main-sequence stars jn Westerlund I for 2 or 3 epochs with a maximum baseline of about one year. Radial velocities variations between these spectra have been measured through cross correlation. Results. We calculate the velocity dispersion from the cross correlation of five yellow hypergiants and one luminous blue variable, that show little radial velocity variations between epochs and have many spectral features in common. After taking into account the effect of small number statistics and undetected binaries, we estimate the velocity dispersion for the massive stars in Westerlund I to be 2.1 (+3.3, -2.1) km s-1. For several different assumptions concerning possible mass segregation and the elongation of the cluster, we find that Westerlund I is subvirial at the 90% confidence level. Conclusions. We can rule out that the cluster is significantly supervirial at the 97% confidence level, indicating that Westerlund I is currently bound. This implies that Westerlund I has survived past the point where any gas expulsion has taken place and is expected to survive for billions of years.
  • Using observations obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have studied the properties of the stellar populations in the central regions of 30 Dor, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The observations clearly reveal the presence of considerable differential extinction across the field. We characterise and quantify this effect using young massive main sequence stars to derive a statistical reddening correction for most objects in the field. We then search for pre-main sequence (PMS) stars by looking for objects with a strong (> 4 sigma) Halpha excess emission and find about 1150 of them over the entire field. Comparison of their location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks for the appropriate metallicity reveals that about one third of these objects are younger than ~4Myr, compatible with the age of the massive stars in the central ionising cluster R136, whereas the rest have ages up to ~30Myr, with a median age of ~12Myr. This indicates that star formation has proceeded over an extended period of time, although we cannot discriminate between an extended episode and a series of short and frequent bursts that are not resolved in time. While the younger PMS population preferentially occupies the central regions of the cluster, older PMS objects are more uniformly distributed across the field and are remarkably few at the very centre of the cluster. We attribute this latter effect to photoevaporation of the older circumstellar discs caused by the massive ionising members of R136.
  • We use near-infrared data obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope to identify objects having the colors of brown dwarfs (BDs) in the field of the massive galactic cluster NGC 3603. These are identified through use of a combination of narrow and medium band filters spanning the J and H bands, and which are particularly sensitive to the presence of the 1.3-1.5{\mu}m H2O molecular band - unique to BDs. We provide a calibration of the relationship between effective temperature and color for both field stars and for BDs. This photometric method provides effective temperatures for BDs to an accuracy of {\pm}350K relative to spectroscopic techniques. This accuracy is shown to be not significantly affected by either stellar surface gravity or uncertainties in the interstellar extinction. We identify nine objects having effective temperature between 1700 and 2200 K, typical of BDs, observed J-band magnitudes in the range 19.5-21.5, and that are strongly clustered towards the luminous core of NGC 3603. However, if these are located at the distance of the cluster, they are far too luminous to be normal BDs. We argue that it is unlikely that these objects are either artifacts of our dataset, normal field BDs/M-type giants or extra-galactic contaminants and, therefore, might represent a new class of stars having the effective temperatures of BDs but with luminosities of more massive stars. We explore the interesting scenario in which these objects would be normal stars that have recently tidally ingested a Hot Jupiter, the remnants of which are providing a short-lived extended photosphere to the central star. In this case, we would expect them to show the signature of fast rotation.
  • Early release science observations of the cluster NGC3603 with the WFC3 on the refurbished HST allow us to study its recent star formation history. Our analysis focuses on stars with Halpha excess emission, a robust indicator of their pre-main sequence (PMS) accreting status. The comparison with theoretical PMS isochrones shows that 2/3 of the objects with Halpha excess emission have ages from 1 to 10 Myr, with a median value of 3 Myr, while a surprising 1/3 of them are older than 10 Myr. The study of the spatial distribution of these PMS stars allows us to confirm their cluster membership and to statistically separate them from field stars. This result establishes unambiguously for the first time that star formation in and around the cluster has been ongoing for at least 10-20 Myr, at an apparently increasing rate.
  • With Spitzer IRS we have obtained sensitive low-resolution spectroscopy from 5 to 35 microns for six supernova remnants (SNRs) that show evidence of shocked molecular gas: Kes 69, 3C 396, Kes 17, G346.6-0.2, G348.5-0.0 and G349.7+0.2. Bright, pure-rotational lines of molecular hydrogen are detected at the shock front in all remnants, indicative of radiative cooling from shocks interacting with dense clouds. We find the excitation of H2 S(0)-S(7) lines in these SNRs requires two non-dissociative shock components: a slow, 10 km/s C- shock through clumps of density 10^6 cm^-3, and a faster, 40-70 km/s C- shock through a medium of density 10^4 cm^-3. The ortho-to-para ratio for molecular hydrogen in the warm shocked gas is typically found to be much less than the LTE value, suggesting that these SNRs are propagating into cold quiescent clouds. Additionally a total of thirteen atomic fine-structure transitions of Ar+, Ar++, Fe+, Ne+, Ne++, S++, and Si+ are detected. The ionic emitting regions are spatially segregated from the molecular emitting regions within the IRS slits. The presence of ionic lines with high appearance potential requires the presence of much faster, dissociative shocks through a lower density medium. The IRS slits are sufficiently wide to include regions outside the SNR which permits emission from diffuse gas around the remnants to be separated from the shocked emission. We find the diffuse molecular hydrogen gas projected outside the SNR is excited to a temperature of 100 to 300 K with a warm gas fraction of 0.5 to 15 percent along the line of sight.
  • Any predictive theory of star formation must explain observed variations (or lack thereof) in the initial mass function. Recent work suggests that we might expect quantitative variations in the IMF as a function of metallicity (Larson 2005) or magnetic field strength (Shu et al. 2004). We summarize results from several on-going studies attempting to constrain the ratio of high to low mass stars, as well as stars to sub- stellar objects, in a variety of different environments, all containing high mass stars. First, we examine the ratio of stars to sub--stellar objects in the nearby Mon R2 region utilizing NICMOS/HST data. We compare our results to the IMF by Kroupa (2002)]} and to the observed ratios for IC 348 and Orion. Second, we present preliminary results for the ratio of high to low mass stars in W51, the most luminous HII region in the galaxy. Based on ground--based multi--colour images of the cluster obtained with the MMT adaptive optics system, we derive a lower limit to the ratio of high-mass to low-mass stars and compare it to the ratios for nearby clusters. Finally, we present the derived IMF for the R136 region in the LMC where the metallicity is 1/4 solar using HST/NICMOS data. We find that the IMF is consistent with that characterizing the field (Chabrier 2003), as well as nearby star--forming regions, down to 1.0 Msun outside 2 pc. Whereas the results for both Mon R2 and R136 are consistent with the nearby clusters, the ratio of high to low mass stars in W51 tentatively indicates a lack of low--mass objects.