• The C-Band All-Sky Survey (C-BASS) is an all-sky full-polarisation survey at a frequency of 5 GHz, designed to provide complementary data to the all-sky surveys of WMAP and Planck, and future CMB B-mode polarization imaging surveys. The observing frequency has been chosen to provide a signal that is dominated by Galactic synchrotron emission, but suffers little from Faraday rotation, so that the measured polarization directions provide a good template for higher frequency observations, and carry direct information about the Galactic magnetic field. Telescopes in both northern and southern hemispheres with matched optical performance are used to provide all-sky coverage from a ground-based experiment. A continuous-comparison radiometer and a correlation polarimeter on each telescope provide stable imaging properties such that all angular scales from the instrument resolution of 45 arcmin up to full sky are accurately measured. The northern instrument has completed its survey and the southern instrument has started observing. We expect that C-BASS data will significantly improve the component separation analysis of Planck and other CMB data, and will provide important constraints on the properties of anomalous Galactic dust and the Galactic magnetic field.
  • We observe Saturn and its ring system at wavelengths of 1.3 mm (220 GHz) using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) interferometric array. We study the intensity and polarisation structure of the planet and present the best polarisation data of Saturn at these frequencies. Observations using CARMA E-array configuration exhibited some anomalous polarisation pattern in the rings. We provide details of our analysis and discuss the possibility of self gravity wakes in Saturn's ring system resulting in this anomaly. We observe Venus in intensity and polarisation to cross-check the levels of polarisation signal detectable by CARMA. We also discuss how limitations in CARMA instrumental accuracy for observing weakly polarised sources, project this signature as an upper bound of polarisation measurements of Saturn using CARMA.
  • The Bipolar Spherical Harmonics (BipoSH) form a natural basis to study the CMB two point correlation function in a non-statistically isotropic (non-SI) universe. The coefficients of expansion in this basis are a generalisation of the well known CMB angular power spectrum and contain complete information of the statistical properties of a non-SI but Gaussian random CMB sky. We use these coefficients to describe the weak lensing of CMB photons in a non-SI universe. Finally we show that the results reduce to the standard weak lensing results in the isotropic limit.
  • The two point correlation function of the CMB temperature anisotropies is generally assumed to be statistically isotropic (SI). Deviations from this assumption could be traced to physical or observational artefacts and systematic effects. Measurement of non-vanishing power in the BipoSH spectra is a standard statistical technique to search for isotropy violations. Although this is a neat tool allowing a blind search for SI violations in the CMB sky, it is not easy to discern the cause of isotropy violation using this measure. In this article, we propose a novel technique of constructing orthogonal BipoSH estimators, which can be used to discern between models of isotropy violation.
  • Amongst the multitude of inflationary models currently available, models that lead to features in the primordial scalar spectrum are drawing increasing attention, since certain features have been found to provide a better fit to the CMB data than the conventional, nearly scale invariant, primordial spectrum. In this work, we carry out a complete numerical analysis of two models that lead to oscillations over all scales in the scalar power spectrum. We consider the model described by a quadratic potential which is superposed by a sinusoidal modulation and the recently popular axion monodromy model. Since the oscillations continue even on to arc minute scales, in addition to the WMAP data, we also compare the models with the small scale data from ACT. Though, both the models, broadly, result in oscillations in the spectrum, interestingly, we find that, while the monodromy model leads to a considerably better fit to the data in comparison to the standard power law spectrum, the quadratic potential superposed with a sinusoidal modulation does not improve the fit to a similar extent. We also carry out forecasting of the parameters using simulated Planck data for both the models. We show that the Planck mock data performs better in constraining the model parameters as compared to the presently available CMB datasets.
  • Statistical isotropy (SI) has been one of the simplifying assumptions in cosmological model building. Experiments like WMAP and PLANCK are attempting to test this assumption by searching for specific signals in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) two point correlation function. Modifications to this correlation function due to gravitational lensing by the large scale structure (LSS) surrounding us have been ignored in this context. Gravitational lensing will induce signals which mimic isotropy violation even in an isotropic universe. The signal detected in the Bipolar Spherical Harmonic (BipoSH) coefficients $A^{20}_{ll}$ by the WMAP team may be explained by accounting for the lensing modifications to these coefficients. Further the difference in the amplitude of the signal detected in the V-band and W-band maps can be explained by accounting for the differences in the designed angular sensitivity of the instrumental beams. The arguments presented in this article have crucial implications for SI violation studies. Constraining SI violation will only be possible by complementing CMB data sets with all sky measurements of the large scale dark matter distribution. Till that time, the signal detected in the BipoSH coefficients from WMAP-7 could also be yet another suggested evidence of strong deviations from the standard $\Lambda$CDM cosmology based on homogeneous and isotropic FRW models.
  • Certain oscillatory features in the primordial scalar power spectrum are known to provide a better fit to the outliers in the cosmic microwave background data near the multipole moments of $\ell=22$ and 40. These features are usually generated by introducing a step in the popular, quadratic potential describing the canonical scalar field. Such a model will be ruled out, if the tensors remain undetected at a level corresponding to a tensor-to-scalar ratio of, say, $r\simeq 0.1$. In this work, in addition to the popular quadratic potential, we investigate the effects of the step in a small field model and a tachyon model. With possible applications to future datasets (such as PLANCK) in mind, we evaluate the tensor power spectrum exactly, and include its contribution in our analysis. We compare the models with the WMAP (five as well as seven-year), the QUaD and the ACBAR data. As expected, a step at a particular location and of a suitable magnitude and width is found to improve the fit to the outliers (near $\ell=22$ and 40) in all these cases. We point out that, if the tensors prove to be small (say, $r\lesssim 0.01$), the quadratic potential and the tachyon model will cease to be viable, and more attention will need to be paid to examples such as the small field models.
  • Certain anomalies at large angular scales in the cosmic microwave background measured by WMAP have been suggested as possible evidence of breakdown of statistical isotropy(SI). Most CMB photons free-stream to the present from the surface of last scattering. It is thus reasonable to expect statistical isotropy violation in the CMB photon distribution observed now to have originated from SI violation in the baryon-photon fluid at last scattering, in addition to anisotropy of the primordial power spectrum studied earlier in literature. We consider the generalized anisotropic brightness distribution fluctuations, $\Delta(\vec{k}, \hat{n}, \tau)$ (at conformal time $\tau$) in contrast to the SI case where it is simply a function of $|\vec{k}|$ and $\hat{k} \cdot \hat{n}$. The brightness fluctuations expanded in Bipolar Spherical Harmonic (BipoSH) series, can then be written as $\Delta_{\ell_1 \ell_2}^{L M}(\vec{k}, \tau)$ where $L > 0$ terms encode deviations from statistical isotropy. We study the evolution of $\Delta_{\ell_1 \ell_2}^{L M}(\vec{k}, \tau)$ from non-zero terms $\Delta_{\ell_3 \ell_4}^{L M}(\vec{k}, \tau_s)$ at last scattering. Similar to the SI case, power at small spherical harmonic (SH) multipoles of $\Delta_{\ell_3 \ell_4}^{L M}(\vec{k},\tau_s)$ at the last scattering, is transferred to $\Delta_{\ell_1 \ell_2}^{L M}(\vec{k}, \tau)$ at larger SH multipoles. The structural similarity is more apparent in the asymptotic expression for large values of the final SH multipoles. This formalism allows an elegant identification of any SI violation observed today to a possible origin in the SI violation present in the baryon-photon fluid (eg., due to the presence of significant magnetic field).