• We consider the $(\ell_p,\ell_r)$-Grothendieck problem, which seeks to maximize the bilinear form $y^T A x$ for an input matrix $A$ over vectors $x,y$ with $\|x\|_p=\|y\|_r=1$. The problem is equivalent to computing the $p \to r^*$ operator norm of $A$. The case $p=r=\infty$ corresponds to the classical Grothendieck problem. Our main result is an algorithm for arbitrary $p,r \ge 2$ with approximation ratio $(1+\epsilon_0)/(\sinh^{-1}(1)\cdot \gamma_{p^*} \,\gamma_{r^*})$ for some fixed $\epsilon_0 \le 0.00863$. Comparing this with Krivine's approximation ratio of $(\pi/2)/\sinh^{-1}(1)$ for the original Grothendieck problem, our guarantee is off from the best known hardness factor of $(\gamma_{p^*} \gamma_{r^*})^{-1}$ for the problem by a factor similar to Krivine's defect. Our approximation follows by bounding the value of the natural vector relaxation for the problem which is convex when $p,r \ge 2$. We give a generalization of random hyperplane rounding and relate the performance of this rounding to certain hypergeometric functions, which prescribe necessary transformations to the vector solution before the rounding is applied. Unlike Krivine's Rounding where the relevant hypergeometric function was $\arcsin$, we have to study a family of hypergeometric functions. The bulk of our technical work then involves methods from complex analysis to gain detailed information about the Taylor series coefficients of the inverses of these hypergeometric functions, which then dictate our approximation factor. Our result also implies improved bounds for "factorization through $\ell_{2}^{\,n}$" of operators from $\ell_{p}^{\,n}$ to $\ell_{q}^{\,m}$ (when $p\geq 2 \geq q$)--- such bounds are of significant interest in functional analysis and our work provides modest supplementary evidence for an intriguing parallel between factorizability, and constant-factor approximability.
  • We study the problem of computing the $p\rightarrow q$ norm of a matrix $A \in R^{m \times n}$, defined as \[ \|A\|_{p\rightarrow q} ~:=~ \max_{x \,\in\, R^n \setminus \{0\}} \frac{\|Ax\|_q}{\|x\|_p} \] This problem generalizes the spectral norm of a matrix ($p=q=2$) and the Grothendieck problem ($p=\infty$, $q=1$), and has been widely studied in various regimes. When $p \geq q$, the problem exhibits a dichotomy: constant factor approximation algorithms are known if $2 \in [q,p]$, and the problem is hard to approximate within almost polynomial factors when $2 \notin [q,p]$. The regime when $p < q$, known as \emph{hypercontractive norms}, is particularly significant for various applications but much less well understood. The case with $p = 2$ and $q > 2$ was studied by [Barak et al, STOC'12] who gave sub-exponential algorithms for a promise version of the problem (which captures small-set expansion) and also proved hardness of approximation results based on the Exponential Time Hypothesis. However, no NP-hardness of approximation is known for these problems for any $p < q$. We study the hardness of approximating matrix norms in both the above cases and prove the following results: - We show that for any $1< p < q < \infty$ with $2 \notin [p,q]$, $\|A\|_{p\rightarrow q}$ is hard to approximate within $2^{O(\log^{1-\epsilon}\!n)}$ assuming $NP \not\subseteq BPTIME(2^{\log^{O(1)}\!n})$. This suggests that, similar to the case of $p \geq q$, the hypercontractive setting may be qualitatively different when $2$ does not lie between $p$ and $q$. - For all $p \geq q$ with $2 \in [q,p]$, we show $\|A\|_{p\rightarrow q}$ is hard to approximate within any factor than $1/(\gamma_{p^*} \cdot \gamma_q)$, where for any $r$, $\gamma_r$ denotes the $r^{th}$ norm of a gaussian, and $p^*$ is the dual norm of $p$.
  • We consider the following basic problem: given an $n$-variate degree-$d$ homogeneous polynomial $f$ with real coefficients, compute a unit vector $x \in \mathbb{R}^n$ that maximizes $|f(x)|$. Besides its fundamental nature, this problem arises in diverse contexts ranging from tensor and operator norms to graph expansion to quantum information theory. The homogeneous degree $2$ case is efficiently solvable as it corresponds to computing the spectral norm of an associated matrix, but the higher degree case is NP-hard. We give approximation algorithms for this problem that offer a trade-off between the approximation ratio and running time: in $n^{O(q)}$ time, we get an approximation within factor $O_d((n/q)^{d/2-1})$ for arbitrary polynomials, $O_d((n/q)^{d/4-1/2})$ for polynomials with non-negative coefficients, and $O_d(\sqrt{m/q})$ for sparse polynomials with $m$ monomials. The approximation guarantees are with respect to the optimum of the level-$q$ sum-of-squares (SoS) SDP relaxation of the problem. Known polynomial time algorithms for this problem rely on "decoupling lemmas." Such tools are not capable of offering a trade-off like our results as they blow up the number of variables by a factor equal to the degree. We develop new decoupling tools that are more efficient in the number of variables at the expense of less structure in the output polynomials. This enables us to harness the benefits of higher level SoS relaxations. We complement our algorithmic results with some polynomially large integrality gaps, albeit for a slightly weaker (but still very natural) relaxation. Toward this, we give a method to lift a level-$4$ solution matrix $M$ to a higher level solution, under a mild technical condition on $M$.
  • We study the approximability of constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs) by linear programming (LP) relaxations. We show that for every CSP, the approximation obtained by a basic LP relaxation, is no weaker than the approximation obtained using relaxations given by $\Omega\left(\frac{\log n}{\log \log n}\right)$ levels of the Sherali-Adams hierarchy on instances of size $n$. It was proved by Chan et al. [FOCS 2013] that any polynomial size LP extended formulation is no stronger than relaxations obtained by a super-constant levels of the Sherali-Adams hierarchy.. Combining this with our result also implies that any polynomial size LP extended formulation is no stronger than the basic LP. Using our techniques, we also simplify and strengthen the result by Khot et al. [STOC 2014] on (strong) approximation resistance for LPs. They provided a necessary and sufficient condition under which $\Omega(\log \log n)$ levels of the Sherali-Adams hierarchy cannot achieve an approximation better than a random assignment. We simplify their proof and strengthen the bound to $\Omega\left(\frac{\log n}{\log \log n}\right)$ levels.
  • In 1970, Donald Ornstein proved a landmark result in dynamical systems, viz., two Bernoulli systems with the same entropy are isomorphic except for a measure 0 set. Keane and Smorodinsky gave a finitary proof of this result. They also indicated how one can generalize the result to mixing Markov Shifts. We adapt their construction to show that if two computable mixing Markov systems have the same entropy, then there is a layerwise computable isomorphism defined on all Martin-Lof random points in the system. Since the set of Martin-Lof random points forms a measure 1 set, it implies the classical result for such systems. This result uses several recent developments in computable analysis and algorithmic randomness. Following the work by Braverman, Nandakumar, and Hoyrup and Rojas introduced discontinuous functions into the study of algorithmic randomness. We utilize Hoyrup and Rojas' elegant notion of layerwise computable functions to produce the test of randomness in our result. Further, we use the recent result of the effective Shannon-McMillan-Breiman theorem, independently established by Hochman and Hoyrup to prove the properties of our construction. We show that the result cannot be improved to include all points in the systems - only trivial computable isomorphisms exist between systems with the same entropy.
  • In the online prediction framework, we use generalized entropy of to study the loss rate of predictors when outcomes are drawn according to stationary ergodic distributions over the binary alphabet. We show that the notion of generalized entropy of a regular game \cite{KVV04} is well-defined for stationary ergodic distributions. In proving this, we obtain new game-theoretic proofs of some classical information theoretic inequalities. Using Birkhoff's ergodic theorem and convergence properties of conditional distributions, we prove that a classical Shannon-McMillan-Breiman theorem holds for a restricted class of regular games, when no computational constraints are imposed on the prediction strategies. If a game is mixable, then there is an optimal aggregating strategy which loses at most an additive constant when compared to any other lower semicomputable strategy. The loss incurred by this algorithm on an infinite sequence of outcomes is called its predictive complexity. We use our version of Shannon-McMillan-Breiman theorem to prove that when a restriced regular game has a predictive complexity, the predictive complexity converges to the generalized entropy of the game almost everywhere with respect to the stationary ergodic distribution.