• We propose a class of intrinsic Gaussian processes (in-GPs) for interpolation, regression and classification on manifolds with a primary focus on complex constrained domains or irregular shaped spaces arising as subsets or submanifolds of R, R2, R3 and beyond. For example, in-GPs can accommodate spatial domains arising as complex subsets of Euclidean space. in-GPs respect the potentially complex boundary or interior conditions as well as the intrinsic geometry of the spaces. The key novelty of the proposed approach is to utilise the relationship between heat kernels and the transition density of Brownian motion on manifolds for constructing and approximating valid and computationally feasible covariance kernels. This enables in-GPs to be practically applied in great generality, while existing approaches for smoothing on constrained domains are limited to simple special cases. The broad utilities of the in-GP approach is illustrated through simulation studies and data examples.
  • Gaussian processes (GPs) are very widely used for modeling of unknown functions or surfaces in applications ranging from regression to classification to spatial processes. Although there is an increasingly vast literature on applications, methods, theory and algorithms related to GPs, the overwhelming majority of this literature focuses on the case in which the input domain corresponds to a Euclidean space. However, particularly in recent years with the increasing collection of complex data, it is commonly the case that the input domain does not have such a simple form. For example, it is common for the inputs to be restricted to a non-Euclidean manifold, a case which forms the motivation for this article. In particular, we propose a general extrinsic framework for GP modeling on manifolds, which relies on embedding of the manifold into a Euclidean space and then constructing extrinsic kernels for GPs on their images. These extrinsic Gaussian processes (eGPs) are used as prior distributions for unknown functions in Bayesian inferences. Our approach is simple and general, and we show that the eGPs inherit fine theoretical properties from GP models in Euclidean spaces. We consider applications of our models to regression and classification problems with predictors lying in a large class of manifolds, including spheres, planar shape spaces, a space of positive definite matrices, and Grassmannians. Our models can be readily used by practitioners in biological sciences for various regression and classification problems, such as disease diagnosis or detection. Our work is also likely to have impact in spatial statistics when spatial locations are on the sphere or other geometric spaces.
  • Quantitative modeling of post-transcriptional regulation process is a challenging problem in systems biology. A mechanical model of the regulatory process needs to be able to describe the available spatio-temporal protein concentration and mRNA expression data and recover the continuous spatio-temporal fields. Rigorous methods are required to identify model parameters. A promising approach to deal with these difficulties is proposed using Gaussian process as a prior distribution over the latent function of protein concentration and mRNA expression. In this study, we consider a partial differential equation mechanical model with differential operators and latent function. Since the operators at stake are linear, the information from the physical model can be encoded into the kernel function. Hybrid Monte Carlo methods are employed to carry out Bayesian inference of the partial differential equation parameters and Gaussian process kernel parameters. The spatio-temporal field of protein concentration and mRNA expression are reconstructed without explicitly solving the partial differential equation.
  • Group dynamic movement is a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognised, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However, to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias in non-ideal scenarios, we show that generally the estimation of models of this type is both feasible and ecologically informative. We illustrate the approach using real movement data from 11 reindeer (Rangifer tarandus). Results indicate a directional bias towards a group centroid for reindeer in an encamped state. Though the attraction to the group centroid is relatively weak, our model successfully captures group-influenced movement dynamics. Specifically, as compared to a regular mixture of correlated random walks, the group dynamic model more accurately predicts the non-diffusive behaviour of a cohesive mobile group.