• A great deal of significant progress has been seen in the study of information spreading on populations of networked individuals. A common point in many of past studies is that there is only one transition in the phase diagram of the final accepted size versus the transmission probability. However, whether other factors alter this phenomenology is still under debate, especially for the case of information spreading through many channels and platforms. In the present study, we adopt a two-layered network to represent the interactions of multiple channels and propose a SAR (Susceptible-Accepted-Recovered) information spreading model. Interestingly, our model shows a novel double transition including a continuous transition and a following discontinuous transition in the phase diagram, which originates from two outbreaks between the two layers of the network. Further, we reveal that the key factors are a weak coupling condition between the two layers, a large adoption threshold and the difference of the degree distributions between the two layers. Then, an edge-based compartmental theory is developed which fully explains all numerical results. Our findings may be of significance for understanding the secondary outbreaks of the information in real life.
  • Information spreading has been studied for decades, but its underlying mechanism is still under debate, especially for those ones spreading extremely fast through Internet. By focusing on the information spreading data of six typical events on Sina Weibo, we surprisingly find that the spreading of modern information shows some new features, i.e. either extremely fast or slow, depending on the individual events. To understand its mechanism, we present a Susceptible-Accepted-Recovered (SAR) model with both information sensitivity and social reinforcement. Numerical simulations show that the model can reproduce the main spreading patterns of the six typical events. By this model we further reveal that the spreading can be speeded up by increasing either the strength of information sensitivity or social reinforcement. Depending on the transmission probability and information sensitivity, the final accepted size can change from continuous to discontinuous transition when the strength of the social reinforcement is large. Moreover, an edge-based compartmental theory is presented to explain the numerical results. These findings may be of significance on the control of information spreading in modern society.
  • Networks in nature rarely function in isolation but instead interact with one another with a form of a network of networks (NoN). A network of networks with interdependency between distinct networks contains instability of abrupt collapse related to the global rule of activation. As a remedy of the collapse instability, here we investigate a model of correlated NoN. We find that the collapse instability can be removed when hubs provide the majority of interconnections and interconnections are convergent between hubs. Thus, our study identifies a stable structure of correlated NoN against catastrophic failures. Our result further suggests a plausible way to enhance network robustness by manipulating connection patterns, along with other methods such as controlling the state of node based on a local rule.
  • The study of epidemic spreading on populations of networked individuals has seen recently a great deal of significant progresses. A common point of all past studies is, however, that there is only one peak of infected density in each single epidemic spreading episode. At variance, real data from different cities over the world suggest that, besides a major single peak trait of infected density, a finite probability exists for a pattern made of two (or multiple) peaks. We show that such a latter feature is fully distinctive of a multilayered network of interactions, and reveal that actually a two peaks pattern emerges from different time delays at which the epidemic spreads in between the two layers. Further, we show that essential ingredients are different degree distributions in the two layers and a weak coupling condition between the layers themselves. Moreover, an edge-based theory is developed which fully explains all numerical results. Our findings may therefore be of significance for protecting secondary disasters of epidemics, which are definitely undesired in real life.
  • Epidemic spreading has been studied for a long time and most of them are focused on the growing aspect of a single epidemic outbreak. Recently, we extended the study to the case of recurrent epidemics (Sci. Rep. {\bf 5}, 16010 (2015)) but limited only to a single network. We here report from the real data of coupled regions or cities that the recurrent epidemics in two coupled networks are closely related to each other and can show either synchronized outbreak phase where outbreaks occur simultaneously in both networks or mixed outbreak phase where outbreaks occur in one network but do not in another one. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we present a two-layered network model of coupled recurrent epidemics to reproduce the synchronized and mixed outbreak phases. We show that the synchronized outbreak phase is preferred to be triggered in two coupled networks with the same average degree while the mixed outbreak phase is preferred for the case with different average degrees. Further, we show that the coupling between the two layers is preferred to suppress the mixed outbreak phase but enhance the synchronized outbreak phase. A theoretical analysis based on microscopic Markov-chain approach is presented to explain the numerical results. This finding opens a new window for studying the recurrent epidemics in multi-layered networks.