• We use Gaia Data Release 2 to identify 13,928 white dwarfs within 100 pc of the Sun. The exquisite astrometry and photometry from Gaia reveals for the first time a bifurcation in the observed white dwarf sequence in both Gaia and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey passbands. The latter is easily explained by a helium atmosphere (DB) white dwarf fraction of 36%. However, the bifurcation in the Gaia passbands cannot be explained by DB white dwarfs. We simulate theoretical color-magnitude diagrams for single and binary white dwarfs using a population synthesis approach and demonstrate that the only way to explain the bifurcation in the Gaia data is through a significant contribution from single white dwarfs that formed through mergers. This is the first direct detection of such a population in the solar neighborhood.
  • Recent Kepler photometry has revealed that about half of white dwarfs (WDs) have periodic, low-level (~ 1e-4 - 1e-3), optical variations. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ultraviolet spectroscopy has shown that up to about one half of WDs are actively accreting rocky planetary debris, as evidenced by the presence of photospheric metal absorption lines. We have obtained HST ultraviolet spectra of seven WDs that have been monitored for periodic variations, to test the hypothesis that these two phenomena are causally connected, i.e. that the optical periodic modulation is caused by WD rotation coupled with an inhomogeneous surface distribution of accreted metals. We detect photospheric metals in four out of the seven WDs. However, we find no significant correspondence between the existence of optical periodic variability and the detection of photospheric ultraviolet absorption lines. Thus the null hypothesis stands, that the two phenomena are not directly related. Some other source of WD surface inhomogeneity, perhaps related to magnetic field strength, combined with the WD rotation, or alternatively effects due to close binary companions, may be behind the observed optical modulation. We report the marginal detection of molecular hydrogen in WD J1949+4734, only the fourth known WD with detected H_2 lines. We also re-classify J1926+4219 as a carbon-rich He-sdO subdwarf.
  • We present the results from a Gemini snapshot radial-velocity survey of 44 low-mass white dwarf candidates selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy. To find sub-hour orbital period binary systems, our time-series spectroscopy had cadences of 2 to 8 min over a period of 20-30 min. Through follow-up observations at Gemini and the MMT, we identify four double degenerate binary systems with periods ranging from 53 min to 7 h. The shortest period system, SDSS J123549.88+154319.3, was recently identified as a subhour period detached binary by Breedt and collaborators. Here we refine the orbital and physical parameters of this system. High-speed and time domain survey photometry observations do not reveal eclipses or other photometric effects in any of our targets. We compare the period distribution of these four systems with the orbital period distribution of known double white dwarfs; the median period decreases from 0.64 to 0.24 d for $M=0.3-0.5 M_{\odot}$ to $M<0.3 M_{\odot}$ white dwarfs. However, we do not find a statistically significant correlation between the orbital period and white dwarf mass.
  • We address the physical nature of subdwarf A-type (sdA) stars and their possible link to extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarfs (WDs). The two classes of objects are confused in low-resolution spectroscopy. However, colors and proper motions indicate that sdA stars are cooler and more luminous, and thus larger in radius, than published ELM WDs. We demonstrate that surface gravities derived from pure hydrogen models suffer a systematic ~1 dex error for sdA stars, likely explained by metal line blanketing below 9000 K. A detailed study of five eclipsing binaries with radial velocity orbital solutions and infrared excess establishes that these sdA stars are metal-poor ~1.2 Msun main sequence stars with ~0.8 Msun companions. While WDs must exist at sdA temperatures, only ~1% of a magnitude-limited sdA sample should be ELM WDs. We conclude that the majority of sdA stars are metal-poor A-F type stars in the halo, and that recently discovered pulsating ELM WD-like stars with no obvious radial velocity variations may be SX Phe variables, not pulsating WDs.
  • We present a detailed analysis of the white dwarf luminosity functions derived from the local 40 pc sample and the deep proper motion catalog of Munn et al (2014, 2017). Many of the previous studies ignored the contribution of thick disk white dwarfs to the Galactic disk luminosity function, which results in an erronous age measurement. We demonstrate that the ratio of thick/thin disk white dwarfs is roughly 20\% in the local sample. Simultaneously fitting for both disk components, we derive ages of 6.8-7.0 Gyr for the thin disk and 8.7 $\pm$ 0.1 Gyr for the thick disk from the local 40 pc sample. Similarly, we derive ages of 7.4-8.2 Gyr for the thin disk and 9.5-9.9 Gyr for the thick disk from the deep proper motion catalog, which shows no evidence of a deviation from a constant star formation rate in the past 2.5 Gyr. We constrain the time difference between the onset of star formation in the thin disk and the thick disk to be $1.6^{+0.3}_{-0.4}$ Gyr. The faint end of the luminosity function for the halo white dwarfs is less constrained, resulting in an age estimate of $12.5^{+1.4}_{-3.4}$ Gyr for the Galactic inner halo. This is the first time ages for all three major components of the Galaxy are obtained from a sample of field white dwarfs that is large enough to contain significant numbers of disk and halo objects. The resultant ages agree reasonably well with the age estimates for the oldest open and globular clusters.
  • We report the discovery of four massive ($M > 0.8\,M_\odot$) ZZ Ceti white dwarfs, including an ultramassive $1.16\,M_\odot$ star. We obtained ground based, time-series photometry for thirteen white dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 and Data Release 10 whose atmospheric parameters place them within the ZZ Ceti instability strip. We detect mono-periodic pulsations in three of our targets (J1053, J1554, and J2038) and identify three periods of pulsation in J0840 (173, 327, and 797 s). Fourier analysis of the remaining nine objects do not indicate variability above the $4\langle{A}\rangle$ detection threshold. Our preliminary asteroseismic analysis of J0840 yields a stellar mass $M=1.14\pm 0.01\,M_{\odot}$, hydrogen and helium envelope masses of $M_H = 5.8 \times 10^{-7}\,M_{\odot}$ and $M_{He}=4.5 \times 10^{-4}\,M_{\odot}$, and an expected core crystallized mass ratio of 50-70\%. J1053, J1554, and J2038 have masses in the range $0.84-0.91 M_\odot$ and are expected to have a CO core; however, the core of J0840 could consist of highly crystallized CO or ONeMg given its high mass. These newly discovered massive pulsators represent a significant increase in the number of known ZZ Ceti white dwarfs with mass $M > 0.85\,M_\odot$, and detailed asteroseismic modeling of J0840 will allow for significant tests of crystallization theory in CO and ONeMg core white dwarfs.
  • We assess the photometric variability of nine stars with spectroscopic Teff and log(g) values from the ELM Survey that locate them near the empirical extremely low-mass (ELM) white dwarf instability strip. We discover three new pulsating stars: SDSS J135512.34+195645.4, SDSS J173521.69+213440.6 and SDSS J213907.42+222708.9. However, these are among the few ELM Survey objects that do not show radial velocity variations to confirm the binary nature expected of helium-core white dwarfs. The dominant 4.31-hr pulsation in SDSS J135512.34+195645.4 far exceeds the theoretical cutoff for surface reflection in a white dwarf, and this target is likely a high-amplitude delta Scuti pulsator with an overestimated surface gravity. We estimate the probability to be less than 0.0008 that the lack of measured radial velocity variations in four of eight other pulsating candidate ELM white dwarfs could be due to low orbital inclination. Two other targets exhibit variability as photometric binaries. Partial coverage of the 19.342-hr orbit of WD J030818.19+514011.5 reveals deep eclipses that imply a primary radius > 0.4 solar radii--too large to be consistent with an ELM white dwarf. The only object for which our time series photometry adds support to the ELM white dwarf classification is SDSS J105435.78-212155.9, with consistent signatures of Doppler beaming and ellipsoidal variations. We interpret that the ELM Survey contains multiple false positives from another stellar population at Teff < 9000 K, possibly related to the sdA stars recently reported from SDSS spectra.
  • A catalog of 8472 white dwarf (WD) candidates is presented, selected using reduced proper motions from the deep proper motion catalog of Munn et al. 2014. Candidates are selected in the magnitude range 16 < r < 21.5 over 980 square degrees, and 16 < r < 21.3 over an additional 1276 square degrees, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging footprint. Distances, bolometric luminosities, and atmospheric compositions are derived by fitting SDSS ugriz photometry to pure hydrogen and helium model atmospheres (assuming surface gravities log g = 8). The disk white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) is constructed using a sample of 2839 stars with 5.5 < M_bol < 17, with statistically significant numbers of stars cooler than the turnover in the luminosity function. The WDLF for the halo is also constructed, using a sample of 135 halo WDs with 5 < M_bol < 16. We find space densities of disk and halo WDs in the solar neighborhood of 5.5 +- 0.1 x 10^-3 pc^-3 and 3.5 +- 0.7 x 10^-5 pc^-3, respectively. We resolve the bump in the disk WDLF due to the onset of fully convective envelopes in WDs, and see indications of it in the halo WDLF as well.
  • We present optical spectroscopy and near-infrared photometry of 57 faint ($g= 19-22$) high proper motion white dwarfs identified through repeat imaging of $\approx3100$ square degrees of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey footprint by Munn et al. (2014). We use $ugriz$ and $JH$ photometry to perform a model atmosphere analysis, and identify ten ultracool white dwarfs with $T_{\rm eff}<4000$ K, including the coolest pure H atmosphere white dwarf currently known, J1657+2638, with $T_{\rm eff}= 3550 \pm 100$K. The majority of the objects with cooling ages larger than 9 Gyr display thick disc kinematics and constrain the age of the thick disc to $\geq11$ Gyr. There are four white dwarfs in our sample with large tangential velocities ($v_{tan} > 120$ km $s^{-1}$) and UVW velocities that are more consistent with the halo than the Galactic disc. For typical $0.6 M_{\odot}$ white dwarfs, the cooling ages for these halo candidates range from 2.3 to 8.5 Gyr. However, the total main-sequence + white dwarf cooling ages of these stars would be consistent with the Galactic halo if they are slightly undermassive. Given the magnitude limits of the current large scale surveys, many of the coolest and oldest white dwarfs remain undiscovered in the solar neighborhood, but upcoming surveys such as GAIA and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) should find many of these elusive thick disc and halo white dwarfs.
  • We present the first results from a minute cadence survey of a three square degree field obtained with the Dark Energy Camera. We imaged part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey area over eight half-nights. We use the stacked images to identify 111 high proper motion white dwarf candidates with g $\leq24.5$ mag and search for eclipse-like events and other sources of variability. We find a new g = 20.64 mag pulsating ZZ Ceti star with pulsation periods of 11-13 min. However, we do not find any transiting planetary companions in the habitable zone of our target white dwarfs. Given the probability of eclipses of 1% and our observing window from the ground, the non-detection of such companions in this first field is not surprising. Minute cadence DECam observations of additional fields will provide stringent constraints on the frequency of planets in the white dwarf habitable zone.
  • For sufficiently wide orbital separations {\it a}, the two members of a stellar binary evolve independently. This implies that in a wide double white dwarf (DWD), the more massive WD should always be produced first, when its more massive progenitor ends its main-sequence life, and should therefore be older and cooler than its companion. The bound, wide DWD HS 2220$+$2146 ($a\approx500$ AU) does not conform to this picture: the more massive WD is the younger, hotter of the pair. We show that this discrepancy is unlikely to be due to past mass-transfer phases or to the presence of an unresolved companion. Instead, we propose that HS 2220$+$2146 formed through a new wide DWD evolutionary channel involving the merger of the inner binary in a hierarchical triple system. The resulting blue straggler and its wide companion then evolved independently, forming the WD pair seen today. Although we cannot rule out other scenarios, the most likely formation channel has the inner binary merging while both stars are still on the main sequence. This provides us with the tantalizing possibility that Kozai-Lidov oscillations may have played a role in the inner binary's merger. {\it Gaia} may uncover hundreds more wide DWDs, leading to the identification of other systems like HS 2220$+$2146. There are already indications that other WD systems may have been formed through different, but related, hierarchical triple evolutionary scenarios. Characterizing these populations may allow for thorough testing of the efficiency with which KL oscillations induce stellar mergers.
  • We present Chandra and Swift X-ray observations of four extremely low-mass (ELM) white dwarfs with massive companions. We place stringent limits on X-ray emission from all four systems, indicating that neutron star companions are extremely unlikely and that the companions are almost certainly white dwarfs. Given the observed orbital periods and radial velocity amplitudes, the total masses of these binaries are greater than 1.02 to 1.39 Msun. The extreme mass ratios between the two components make it unlikely that these binary white dwarfs will merge and explode as Type Ia or underluminous supernovae. Instead, they will likely go through stable mass transfer through an accretion disk and turn into interacting AM CVn. Along with three previously known systems, we identify two of our targets, J0811 and J2132, as systems that will definitely undergo stable mass transfer. In addition, we use the binary white dwarf sample from the ELM Survey to constrain the inspiral rate of systems with extreme mass ratios. This rate, 0.00017/year, is consistent with the AM CVn space density estimated from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Hence, stable mass transfer double white dwarf progenitors can account for the entire AM CVn population in the Galaxy.
  • We report the discovery of pulsations in three mixed-atmosphere, extremely low-mass white dwarf (ELM WD, M $\leqslant$ 0.3 M$_{\odot}$) precursors. Following the recent discoveries of pulsations in both ELM and pre-ELM WDs, we targeted pre-ELM WDs with mixed H/He atmospheres with high-speed photometry. We find significant optical variability in all three observed targets with periods in the range 320--590 s, consistent in timescale with theoretical predictions of $p$-mode pulsations in mixed-atmosphere $\approx$ 0.18 M$_{\odot}$ He-core pre-ELM WDs. This represents the first empirical evidence that pulsations in pre-ELM WDs can only occur if a significant amount of He is present in the atmosphere. Future, more extensive, time-series photometry of the brightest of the three new pulsators offers an excellent opportunity to constrain the thickness of the surface H layer, which regulates the cooling timescales for ELM WDs.
  • We present the discovery of 15 extremely low mass (5 < log{g} < 7) white dwarf candidates, 9 of which are in ultra-compact double-degenerate binaries. Our targeted ELM Survey sample now includes 76 binaries. The sample has a lognormal distribution of orbital periods with a median period of 5.4 hr. The velocity amplitudes imply that the binary companions have a normal distribution of mass with 0.76 Msun mean and 0.25 Msun dispersion. Thus extremely low mass white dwarfs are found in binaries with a typical mass ratio of 1:4. Statistically speaking, 95% of the white dwarf binaries have a total mass below the Chandrasekhar mass and thus are not Type Ia supernova progenitors. Yet half of the observed binaries will merge in less than 6 Gyr due to gravitational wave radiation; probable outcomes include single massive white dwarfs and stable mass transfer AM CVn binaries.
  • We estimate the merger rate of double degenerate binaries containing extremely low mass (ELM) <0.3 Msun white dwarfs in the Galaxy. Such white dwarfs are detectable for timescales of 0.1 Gyr -- 1 Gyr in the ELM Survey; the binaries they reside in have gravitational wave merger times of 0.001 Gyr -- 100 Gyr. To explain the observed distribution requires that most ELM white dwarf binary progenitors detach from the common envelope phase with <1 hr orbital periods. We calculate the local space density of ELM white dwarf binaries and estimate a merger rate of 3e-3/yr over the entire disk of the Milky Way; the merger rate in the halo is 10 times smaller. The ELM white dwarf binary merger rate exceeds by a factor of 40 the formation rate of stable mass transfer AM CVn binaries, marginally exceeds the rate of underluminous supernovae, and is identical to the formation rate of R CrB stars. On this basis, we conclude that ELM white dwarf binaries can be the progenitors of all observed AM CVn and possibly underluminous supernovae, however the majority of He+CO white dwarf binaries go through unstable mass transfer and merge, e.g. into single massive ~1 Msun white dwarfs.
  • We present the serendipitous discovery of eclipse-like events around the massive white dwarf SDSS J152934.98+292801.9 (hereafter J1529+2928). We selected J1529+2928 for time-series photometry based on its spectroscopic temperature and surface gravity, which place it near the ZZ Ceti instability strip. Instead of pulsations, we detect photometric dips from this white dwarf every 38 minutes. Follow-up optical spectroscopy observations with Gemini reveal no significant radial velocity variations, ruling out stellar and brown dwarf companions. A disintegrating planet around this white dwarf cannot explain the observed light curves in different filters. Given the short period, the source of the photometric dips must be a dark spot that comes into view every 38 min due to the rotation of the white dwarf. Our optical spectroscopy does not show any evidence of Zeeman splitting of the Balmer lines, limiting the magnetic field strength to B<70 kG. Since up to 15% of white dwarfs display kG magnetic fields, such eclipse-like events should be common around white dwarfs. We discuss the potential implications of this discovery on transient surveys targeting white dwarfs, like the K2 mission and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.
  • Isolated magnetic white dwarfs have field strengths ranging from kilogauss to gigagauss, and constitute an interesting class of objects. The origin of the magnetic field is still the subject of a hot debate. Whether these fields are fossil, hence the remnants of original weak magnetic fields amplified during the course of the evolution of the progenitor of white dwarfs, or on the contrary, are the result of binary interactions or, finally, other physical mechanisms that could produce such large magnetic fields during the evolution of the white dwarf itself, remains to be elucidated. In this work we review the current status and paradigms of magnetic fields in white dwarfs, from both the theoretical and observational points of view.
  • We present observational constraints on the initial-final mass relation (IFMR) using wide double white dwarfs (DWDs). We identify 65 new candidate wide DWDs within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, bringing the number of candidate wide DWDs to 142. We then engage in a spectroscopic follow-up campaign and collect existing spectra for these objects; using these spectra, we derive masses and cooling ages for 54 hydrogen (DA) WDs in DWDs. We also identify one new DA/DB pair, four candidate DA/DC pairs, four candidate DA/DAH pairs, and one new candidate triple degenerate system. Because wide DWDs are co-eval and evolve independently, the difference in the pre-WD lifetimes should equal the difference in the WD cooling ages. We use this to develop a Bayesian hierarchical framework and construct a likelihood function to determine the probability that any particular IFMR fits a sample of wide DWDs. We then define a parametric model for the IFMR and find the best parameters indicated by our sample of DWDs. We place robust constraints on the IFMR for initial masses of 2--4 \Msun. The WD masses produced by our model for stars within this mass range differ from those predicted by semi-empirical fits to open cluster WDs. Within this mass range, where there are few constraining open cluster WDs and disagreements in the cluster ages, wide DWDs may provide more reliable constraints on the IFMR. Expanding this method to the many wide DWDs expected to be discovered by Gaia may transform our understanding of the IFMR.
  • We present the discovery of 11 new double degenerate systems containing extremely low-mass white dwarfs (ELM WDs). Our radial velocity observations confirm that all of the targets have orbital periods $\leq$ 1 day. We perform spectroscopic fits and provide a complete set of physical and binary parameters. We review and compare recent evolutionary calculations and estimate that the systematic uncertainty in our mass determinations due to differences in the evolutionary models is small ($\approx$ 0.01 M$_{\odot}$). Five of the new systems will merge due to gravitational wave radiation within a Hubble time, bringing the total number of merger systems found in the ELM Survey to 38. We examine the ensemble properties of the current sample of ELM WD binaries, including the period distribution as a function of effective temperature, and the implications for the future evolution of these systems. We also revisit the empirical boundaries of instability strip of ELM WDs and identify new pulsating ELM WD candidates. Finally, we consider the kinematic properties of our sample of ELM WDs and estimate that a significant fraction of the WDs from the ELM Survey are members of the Galactic halo.
  • Priorities in exo-planet research are rapidly moving from finding planets to characterizing their physical properties. Of key importance is their chemical composition, which feeds back into our understanding of planet formation. For the foreseeable future, far-ultraviolet spectroscopy of white dwarfs accreting planetary debris remains the only way to directly and accurately measure the bulk abundances of exo-planetary bodies. The exploitation of this method is limited by the sensitivity of HST, and significant progress will require a large-aperture space telescope with a high-throughput ultraviolet spectrograph.
  • We present parallax observations and a detailed model atmosphere analysis of 54 cool and ultracool ($T_{\rm eff}$ < 4000 K) white dwarfs (WDs) in the solar neighbourhood. For the first time, a large number of cool and ultracool WDs have distance and tangential velocities measurements available. Our targets have distances ranging from 21 pc to >100 pc, and include five stars within 30 pc. Contrary to expectations, all but two of them have tangential velocities smaller than 150 km s$^{-1}$ thus suggesting Galactic disc membership. The oldest WDs in this sample have WD cooling ages of 10 Gyr, providing a firm lower limit to the age of the thick disc population. Many of our targets have uncharacteristically large radii, indicating that they are low mass WDs. It appears that we have detected the brighter population of cool and ultracool WDs near the Sun. The fainter population of ultracool CO-core WDs remain to be discovered in large numbers. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope should find these elusive, more massive ultracool WDs in the solar neighbourhood.
  • Characterizing the local space density of double degenerate binary systems is a complementary approach to broad sky surveys of double degenerates to determine the expected rates of white dwarf binary mergers, in particular those that may evolve into other observable phenomena such as extreme helium stars, Am CVn systems, and supernovae Ia. However, there have been few such systems detected in local space. We report here the discovery that WD 1242$-$105, a nearby bright WD, is a double-line spectroscopic binary consisting of two degenerate DA white dwarfs of similar mass and temperature, despite it previously having been spectroscopically characterized as a single degenerate. Follow-up photometry, spectroscopy, and trigonometric parallax have been obtained in an effort to determine the fundamental parameters of each component of this system. The binary has a mass ratio of 0.7 and a trigonometric parallax of 25.5 mas, placing it at a distance of 39 pc. The system's total mass is 0.95 M$_\odot$ and has an orbital period of 2.85 hours, making it the strongest known gravitational wave source ($\log h = -20.78$) in the mHz regime. Because of its orbital period and total mass, WD 1242$-$105 is predicted to merge via gravitational radiation on a timescale of 740 Myr, which will most likely not result in a catastrophic explosion.
  • We report the discovery of the first millisecond pulsar with a pulsating white dwarf companion. Following the recent discoveries of pulsations in extremely low-mass (ELM, <0.3 Msol) white dwarfs (WDs), we targeted ELM WD companions to two millisecond pulsars with high-speed Gemini photometry. We find significant optical variability in PSR J1738+0333 with periods between roughly 1790-3060 s, consistent in timescale with theoretical and empirical observations of pulsations in 0.17 Msol He-core ELM WDs. We additionally put stringent limits on a lack of variability in PSR J1909-3744, showing this ELM WD is not variable to <0.1 per cent amplitude. Thanks to the accurate distance and radius estimates from radio timing measurements, PSR J1738+0333 becomes a benchmark for low-mass, pulsating WDs. Future, more extensive time-series photometry of this system offers an unprecedented opportunity to constrain the physical parameters (including the cooling age) and interior structure of this ELM WD, and in turn, the mass and spin-down age of its pulsar companion.
  • In wide double white dwarf (DWD) binaries, in which the co-eval WDs evolve independently, the more massive, faster-evolving WD can be used to obtain a main-sequence lifetime for the less-massive WD. By converting this lifetime into an initial mass for the less-massive WD, and combining it with the spectroscopically derived mass for this WD, one can constrain the initial-final mass relation (IFMR). However, the number of known and well-characterized DWDs is small, severely limiting their usefulness for this analysis. To obtain new constraints on the IFMR, we search for wide DWDs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 9. We find 65 new candidate systems, thereby raising the number of known wide DWDs to 142. We then engage in a spectroscopic campaign to characterize these pairs, identifying 32 DA/DA pairs, two DA/DB pairs, four DA/DAH candidate pairs, a previously unidentified candidate triple WD system, and five DA/DC WDs. We present a reanalysis of the constraint on the IFMR placed by Finley & Koester (1997) using the DWD PG 0922+162, and finish by discussing how it could be expanded to a generic set of wide DWDs.
  • A new proper motion catalog is presented, combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with second epoch observations in the r band within a portion of the SDSS imaging footprint. The new observations were obtained with the 90prime camera on the Steward Observatory Bok 90 inch telescope, and the Array Camera on the U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 1.3 meter telescope. The catalog covers 1098 square degrees to r = 22.0, an additional 1521 square degrees to r = 20.9, plus a further 488 square degrees of lesser quality data. Statistical errors in the proper motions range from 5 mas/year at the bright end to 15 mas/year at the faint end, for a typical epoch difference of 6 years. Systematic errors are estimated to be roughly 1 mas/year for the Array Camera data, and as much as 2 - 4 mas/year for the 90prime data (though typically less). The catalog also includes a second epoch of r band photometry.