• We present 2-5 $\mu$m spectroscopic observations of the dust coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko obtained with the VIRTIS-H instrument onboard Rosetta during two outbursts that occurred on 2015, 13 September 13.6 h UT and 14 September 18.8 h UT at 1.3 AU from the Sun. Scattering and thermal properties measured before the outburst are in the mean of values measured for moderately active comets. The colour temperature excess (or superheat factor) can be attributed to submicrometre-sized particles composed of absorbing material or to porous fractal-like aggregates such as those collected by the Rosetta in situ dust instruments. The power law index of the dust size distribution is in the range 2-3. The sudden increase of infrared emission associated to the outbursts is correlated with a large increase of the colour temperature (from 300 K to up to 630 K) and a change of the dust colour at 2-2.5 $\mu$m from red to blue colours, revealing the presence of very small grains ($\leq$ 100 nm) in the outburst material. In addition, the measured large bolometric albedos ($\sim$ 0.7) indicate bright grains in the ejecta, which could either be silicatic grains, implying the thermal degradation of the carbonaceous material, or icy grains. The 3-$\mu$m absorption band from water ice is not detected in the spectra acquired during the outbursts, whereas signatures of organic compounds near 3.4 $\mu$m are observed in emission. The H$_2$O 2.7-$\mu$m and CO$_2$ 4.3-$\mu$m vibrational bands do not show any enhancement during the outbursts.
  • May 30, 2017 astro-ph.EP
    We present a summary of the campaign of remote observations that supported the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission. Telescopes across the globe (and in space) followed comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from before Rosetta's arrival until nearly the end of mission in September 2016. These provided essential data for mission planning, large-scale context information for the coma and tails beyond the spacecraft, and a way to directly compare 67P with other comets. The observations revealed 67P to be a relatively `well behaved' comet, typical of Jupiter family comets and with activity patterns that repeat from orbit-to-orbit. Comparison between this large collection of telescopic observations and the in situ results from Rosetta will allow us to better understand comet coma chemistry and structure. This work is just beginning as the mission ends -- in this paper we present a summary of the ground-based observations and early results, and point to many questions that will be addressed in future studies.
  • Observations of the sungrazing comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) were carried out using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) at a heliocentric distance of 0.58-0.54 AU (pre-perihelion) on 2013 November 16-17. Temporally resolved measurements of the coma distributions of HNC, CH$_3$OH, H$_2$CO and dust were obtained over the course of about an hour on each day. During the period UT 10:10-11:00 on Nov. 16, the comet displayed a remarkable drop in activity, manifested as a $>42$% decline in the molecular line and continuum fluxes. The H$_2$CO observations are consistent with an abrupt, $\approx50$% reduction in the cometary gas production rate soon after the start of our observations. On Nov. 17, the total observed fluxes remained relatively constant during a similar period, but strong variations in the morphology of the HNC distribution were detected as a function of time, indicative of a clumpy, intermittent outflow for this species. Our observations suggest that at least part of the detected HNC originated from degradation of nitrogen-rich organic refractory material, released intermittently from confined regions of the nucleus. By contrast, the distributions of CH$_3$OH and H$_2$CO during the Nov. 17 observations were relatively uniform, consistent with isotropic outflow and stable activity levels for these species. These results highlight a large degree of variability in the production of gas and dust from comet ISON during its pre-perihelion outburst, consistent with repeated disruption of the nucleus interspersed with periods of relative quiescence.
  • We present spatially and spectrally-resolved observations of CH$_3$OH emission from comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) using The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) on 2014 June 28-29. Two-dimensional maps of the line-of-sight average rotational temperature ($T_{rot}$) were derived, covering spatial scales $0.3''-1.8''$ (corresponding to sky-projected distances $\rho\sim500$-2500 km). The CH$_3$OH column density distributions are consistent with isotropic, uniform outflow from the nucleus, with no evidence for extended sources of CH$_3$OH in the coma. The $T_{rot}(\rho)$ radial profiles show a significant drop within a few thousand kilometers of the nucleus, falling from about 60 K to 20 K between $\rho=0$ and 2500 km on June 28, whereas on June 29, $T_{rot}$ fell from about 120 K to 40 K between $\rho=$ 0 km and 1000 km. The observed $T_{rot}$ behavior is interpreted primarily as a result of variations in the coma kinetic temperature due to adiabatic cooling of the outflowing gas, as well as radiative cooling of the CH$_3$OH rotational levels. Our excitation model shows that radiative cooling is more important for the $J=7-6$ transitions (at 338 GHz) than for the $K=3-2$ transitions (at 252 GHz), resulting in a strongly sub-thermal distribution of levels in the $J=7-6$ band at $\rho\gtrsim1000$ km. For both bands, the observed temperature drop with distance is less steep than predicted by standard coma theoretical models, which suggests the presence of a significant source of heating in addition to the photolytic heat sources usually considered.
  • Observations of the Pluto-Charon system, acquired with the ALMA interferometer on June 12-13, 2015, have yielded a detection of the CO(3-2) and HCN(4-3) rotational transitions from Pluto, providing a strong confirmation of the presence of CO, and the first observation of HCN, in Pluto's atmosphere. The CO and HCN lines probe Pluto's atmosphere up to ~450 km and ~900 km altitude, respectively. The CO detection yields (i) a much improved determination of the CO mole fraction, as 515+/-40 ppm for a 12 ubar surface pressure (ii) clear evidence for a well-marked temperature decrease (i.e., mesosphere) above the 30-50 km stratopause and a best-determined temperature of 70+/-2 K at 300 km, in agreement with recent inferences from New Horizons / Alice solar occultation data. The HCN line shape implies a high abundance of this species in the upper atmosphere, with a mole fraction >1.5x10-5 above 450 km and a value of 4x10-5 near 800 km. The large HCN abundance and the cold upper atmosphere imply supersaturation of HCN to a degree (7-8 orders of magnitude) hitherto unseen in planetary atmospheres, probably due to the slow kinetics of condensation at the low pressure and temperature conditions of Pluto's upper atmosphere. HCN is also present in the bottom ~100 km of the atmosphere, with a 10-8 - 10-7 mole fraction; this implies either HCN saturation or undersaturation there, depending on the precise stratopause temperature. The HCN column is (1.6+/-0.4)x10^14 cm-2, suggesting a surface-referred net production rate of ~2x10^7 cm-2s-1. Although HCN rotational line cooling affects Pluto's atmosphere heat budget, the amounts determined in this study are insufficient to explain the well-marked mesosphere and upper atmosphere's ~70 K temperature. We finally report an upper limit on the HC3N column density (< 2x10^13 cm-2) and on the HC15N / HC14N ratio (< 1/125).
  • Infrared observations of the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko were carried out from July to September 2015, i.e., around perihelion (13 August 2015), with the high-resolution channel of the VIRTIS instrument onboard Rosetta. We present the analysis of fluorescence emission lines of H$_2$O, CO$_2$, $^{13}$CO$_2$, OCS, and CH$_4$ detected in limb sounding with the field of view at 2.7-5 km from the comet centre. Measurements are sampling outgassing from the illuminated southern hemisphere, as revealed by H$_2$O and CO$_2$ raster maps, which show anisotropic distributions, aligned along the projected rotation axis. An abrupt increase of water production is observed six days after perihelion. In the mean time, CO$_2$, CH$_4$, and OCS abundances relative to water increased by a factor of 2 to reach mean values of 32%, 0.47%, and 0.18%, respectively, averaging post-perihelion data. We interpret these changes as resulting from the erosion of volatile-poor surface layers. Sustained dust ablation due to the sublimation of water ice maintained volatile-rich layers near the surface until at least the end of the considered period, as expected for low thermal inertia surface layers. The large abundance measured for CO$_2$ should be representative of the 67P nucleus original composition, and indicates that 67P is a CO$_2$-rich comet. Comparison with abundance ratios measured in the northern hemisphere shows that seasons play an important role in comet outgassing. The low CO$_2$/H$_2$O values measured above the illuminated northern hemisphere are not original, but the result of the devolatilization of the uppermost layers.
  • The apparition of bright comets C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) in March-April 2013 and January 2015, combined with the improved observational capabilities of submillimeter facilities, offered an opportunity to carry out sensitive compositional and isotopic studies of the volatiles in their coma. We observed comet Lovejoy with the IRAM 30m telescope between 13 and 26 January 2015, and with the Odin submillimeter space observatory on 29 January - 3 February 2015. We detected 22 molecules and several isotopologues. The H$_2^{16}$O and H$_2^{18}$O production rates measured with Odin follow a periodic pattern with a period of 0.94 days and an amplitude of ~25%. The inferred isotope ratios in comet Lovejoy are $^{16}$O/$^{18}$O = 499 $\pm$ 24 and D/H = 1.4 $\pm$ 0.4 $\times 10^{-4}$ in water, $^{32}$S/$^{34}$S = 24.7 $\pm$ 3.5 in CS, all compatible with terrestrial values. The ratio $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C = 109 $\pm$ 14 in HCN is marginally higher than terrestrial and $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N = 145 $\pm$ 12 in HCN is half the Earth ratio. Several upper limits for D/H or 12C/13C in other molecules are reported. From our observation of HDO in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), we report the first D/H ratio in an Oort Cloud comet that is not larger than the terrestrial value. On the other hand, the observation of the same HDO line in the other Oort-cloud comet, C/2012 F6 (Lemmon), suggests a D/H value four times higher. Given the previous measurements of D/H in cometary water, this illustrates that a diversity in the D/H ratio and in the chemical composition, is present even within the same dynamical group of comets, suggesting that current dynamical groups contain comets formed at very different places or times in the early solar system.
  • The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) was used to obtain measurements of spatially and spectrally resolved CH$_3$OH emission from comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) on 28-29 June 2014. Detection of 12-14 emission lines of CH$_3$OH on each day permitted the derivation of spatially-resolved rotational temperature profiles (averaged along the line of sight), for the innermost 5000 km of the coma. On each day, the CH$_3$OH distribution was centrally peaked and approximately consistent with spherically symmetric, uniform outflow. The azimuthally-averaged CH$_3$OH rotational temperature ($T_{rot}$) as a function of sky-projected nucleocentric distance ($\rho$), fell by about 40 K between $\rho=0$ and 2500 km on 28 June, whereas on 29 June, $T_{rot}$ fell by about 50 K between $\rho=$0 km and 1500 km. A remarkable ($\sim50$ K) rise in $T_{rot}$ at $\rho=$1500-2500 km on 29 June was not present on 28 June. The observed variations in CH$_3$OH rotational temperature are interpreted primarily as a result of variations in the coma kinetic temperature due to adiabatic cooling, and heating through Solar irradiation, but collisional and radiative non-LTE excitation processes also play a role.
  • Comparison of their chemical compositions shows, to first order, a good agreement between the cometary and interstellar abundances. However, a complex O-bearing organic molecule, ethylene glycol (CH$_{2}$OH)$_{2}$, seems to depart from this correlation because it was not easily detected in the interstellar medium although it proved to be rather abundant with respect to other O-bearing species in comet Hale-Bopp. Ethylene glycol thus appears, together with the related molecules glycolaldehyde CH$_{2}$OHCHO and ethanol CH$_{3}$CH$_{2}$OH, as a key species in the comparison of interstellar and cometary ices as well as in any discussion on the formation of cometary matter. We focus here on the analysis of ethylene glycol in the nearest and best studied hot core-like region, Orion-KL. We use ALMA interferometric data because high spatial resolution observations allow us to reduce the line confusion problem with respect to single-dish observations since different molecules are expected to exhibit different spatial distributions. Furthermore, a large spectral bandwidth is needed because many individual transitions are required to securely detect large organic molecules. Confusion and continuum subtraction are major issues and have been handled with care. We have detected the aGg' conformer of ethylene glycol in Orion-KL. The emission is compact and peaks towards the Hot Core close to the main continuum peak, about 2" to the south-west; this distribution is notably different from other O-bearing species. Assuming optically thin lines and local thermodynamic equilibrium, we derive a rotational temperature of 145 K and a column density of 4.6 10$^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$. The limit on the column density of the gGg' conformer is five times lower.
  • Results are presented from the first cometary observations using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), including measurements of the spatially-resolved distributions of HCN, HNC, H$_2$CO and dust within the comae of two comets: C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2012 S1 (ISON), observed at heliocentric distances of 1.5 AU and 0.54 AU, respectively. These observations (with angular resolution $\approx0.5''$), reveal an unprecedented level of detail in the distributions of these fundamental cometary molecules, and demonstrate the power of ALMA for quantitative measurements of the distributions of molecules and dust in the inner comae of typical bright comets. In both comets, HCN is found to originate from (or within a few hundred km of) the nucleus, with a spatial distribution largely consistent with spherically-symmetric, uniform outflow. By contrast, the HNC distributions are clumpy and asymmetrical, with peaks at cometocentric radii $\sim$500-1000~km, consistent with release of HNC in collimated outflow(s). Compared to HCN, the H$_2$CO distribution in comet Lemmon is very extended. The interferometric visibility amplitudes are consistent with coma production of H$_2$CO and HNC from unidentified precursor material(s) in both comets. Adopting a Haser model, the H$_2$CO parent scale-length is found to be a few thousand km in Lemmon and only a few hundred km in ISON, consistent with destruction of the precursor by photolysis or thermal degradation at a rate which scales in proportion to the Solar radiation flux.
  • A spectral survey in the 1 mm wavelength range was undertaken in the long-period comets C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using the 30 m telescope of the Institut de radioastronomie millim\'etrique (IRAM) in April and November-December 2013. We report the detection of ethylene glycol (CH$_2$OH)$_2$ (aGg' conformer) and formamide (NH$_2$CHO) in the two comets. The abundances relative to water of ethylene glycol and formamide are 0.2-0.3% and 0.02% in the two comets, similar to the values measured in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). We also report the detection of HCOOH and CH$_3$CHO in comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), and a search for other complex species (methyl formate, glycolaldehyde).
  • We aimed to measure the H2O and dust production rates in C/2006 W3 (Christensen) with the Herschel Space Observatory at a heliocentric distance of ~ 5 AU. We have searched for emission in the H2O and NH3 ground-state rotational transitions at 557 GHz and 572 GHz, simultaneously, with HIFI onboard Herschel on UT 1.5 September 2010. Photometric observations of the dust coma in the 70 and 160 {\mu}m channels were acquired with the PACS instrument on UT 26.5 August 2010. A tentative 4-{\sigma} H2O line emission feature was found in the spectra obtained with the HIFI wide-band and high-resolution spectrometers, from which we derive a water production rate of $2.0(5) \times 10^{27}$ molec. s$^{-1}$. A 3-{\sigma} upper limit for the ammonia production rate of <$1.5 \times 10^{27}$ molec. s$^{-1}$ is obtained taking into account the contribution from all hyperfine components. The blueshift of the water line detected by HIFI suggests preferential emission from the subsolar point. However, it is also possible that water sublimation occurs in small ice-bearing grains that are emitted from an active region on the nucleus surface at a speed of ~ 0.2 km s$^{-1}$. The dust thermal emission was detected in the 70 and 160 {\mu}m filters, with a more extended emission in the blue channel. The dust production rates, obtained for a dust size distribution index that explains the fluxes at the photocenters of the PACS images, lie in the range 70-110 kg s$^{-1}$. Scaling the CO production rate measured post-perihelion at 3.20 and 3.32 AU, these values correspond to a dust-to-gas production rate ratio in the range 0.3-0.4. The dust production rates derived in August 2010 are roughly one order of magnitude lower than in September 2009, suggesting that the dust-to-gas production rate ratio remained approximately constant during the period when the activity became increasingly dominated by CO outgassing.
  • We present molecular observations carried out with the IRAM 30m telescope at wavelengths around 1.15 mm towards the Oort cloud comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) when they were at 0.6 and 1 au, respectively, from the Sun. We detect HCN, HNC, and CH3OH in both comets, together with the ion HCO+ in comet ISON and a few weak unidentified lines in comet Lovejoy, one of which might be assigned to methylamine (CH3NH2). The monitoring of the HCN J = 3-2 line showed a tenfold enhancement in comet ISON on November 14.4 UT due to an outburst of activity whose exact origin is unknown, although it might be related to some break-up of the nucleus. The set of CH3OH lines observed was used to derive the kinetic temperature in the coma, 90 K in comet ISON and 60 K in comet Lovejoy. The HNC/HCN ratios derived, 0.18 in ISON and 0.05 in Lovejoy, are similar to those found in most previous comets and are consistent with an enhancement of HNC as the comet approaches the Sun. Phosphine (PH3) was also searched for unsuccessfully in both comets through its fundamental 1-0 transition, and 3 sigma upper limits corresponding to PH3/H2O ratios 4-10 times above the solar P/O elemental ratio were derived.
  • HCl and HF are expected to be the main reservoirs of fluorine and chlorine wherever hydrogen is predominantly molecular. They are found to be strongly depleted in dense molecular clouds, suggesting freeze-out onto grains in such cold environments. We can then expect that HCl and HF were also the major carriers of Cl and F in the gas and icy phases of the outer solar nebula, and were incorporated into comets. We aimed to measure the HCl and HF abundances in cometary ices as they can provide insights on the halogen chemistry in the early solar nebula. We searched for the J(1-0) lines of HCl and HF at 626 and 1232 GHz, respectively, using the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. HCl was searched for in comets 103P/Hartley 2 and C/2009 P1 (Garradd), whereas observations of HF were conducted in comet C/2009 P1. In addition, observations of H$_2$O and H$_2^{18}$O lines were performed in C/2009 P1 to measure the H$_2$O production rate. Three lines of CH$_3$OH were serendipitously observed in the HCl receiver setting. HCl is not detected, whereas a marginal (3.6-$\sigma$) detection of HF is obtained. The upper limits for the HCl abundance relative to water are 0.011% and 0.022%, for 103P and C/2009 P1, respectively, showing that HCl is depleted with respect to the solar Cl/O abundance by a factor more than 6$^{+6}_{-3}$ in 103P, where the error is related to the uncertainty in the chlorine solar abundance. The marginal HF detection obtained in C/2009 P1 corresponds to an HF abundance relative to water of (1.8$\pm$0.5) $\times$ 10$^{-4}$, which is approximately consistent with a solar photospheric F/O abundance. The observed depletion of HCl suggests that HCl was not the main reservoir of chlorine in the regions of the solar nebula where these comets formed. HF was possibly the main fluorine compound in the gas phase of the outer solar nebula.
  • Our goal was to characterize the distant gaseous and dust activity of comet C\2012 S1 (ISON), inbound, from observations of H2O, CO and the dust coma in the far-infrared and submillimeter domains. In this paper, we report observations undertaken with the Herschel Space Observatory on 8 & 13 March 2013 (rh = 4.54 - 4.47AU) and with the 30m telescope of Institut de Radioastronomie Millim\'etrique (IRAM) in March and April 2013 (rh = 4.45 - 4.18 AU). The HIFI instrument aboard Herschel was used to observe the H$_{2}$O $1_{10}-1_{01}$ line at 557 GHz, whereas images of the dust coma at 70 and 160 {\mu}m were acquired with the PACS instrument. Spectra acquired at the IRAM 30m telescope cover the CO J(2-1) line at 230.5 GHz. The spectral observations were analysed with excitation and radiative transfer models. A model of dust thermal emission taking into account a range of dust sizes is used to analyse the PACS maps. While H$_{2}$O was not detected in our 8 March 2013 observation, we derive a sensitive 3 $\sigma$ upper limit of QH$_{2}$O < 3.5 x 10$^{26}$ molecules/s for this date. A marginal 3.2 $\sigma$ detection of CO is found, corresponding to a CO production rate of QCO = 3.5 x 10$^{27}$ molecules/s. The Herschel PACS measurements show a clear detection of the coma and tail in both the 70 {\mu}m and 160 {\mu}m maps. Under the assumption of a 2 km radius nucleus, we infer dust production rates in the range 10 - 13 kg/s or 40 - 70 kg/s depending on whether a low or high gaseous activity from the nucleus surface is assumed. We constrain the size distribution of the emitted dust by comparing PACS 70 and 160 {\mu}m data, and considering optical data. Size indices between -4 and -3.6 are suggested. The morphology of the tail observed on 70 {\mu}m images can be explained by the presence of grains with ages older than 60 days.
  • Comet 103P/Hartley 2 made a close approach to the Earth in October 2010. It was the target of an extensive observing campaign and was visited by the Deep Impact spacecraft (mission EPOXI). We present observations of HCN and CH3OH emission lines conducted with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer on 22-23, 28 October and 4, 5 November 2010 at 1.1, 1.9 and 3.4 mm wavelengths. The thermal emission from the dust coma and nucleus is detected simultaneously. Interferometric images with unprecedented spatial resolution are obtained. A sine-wave variation of the thermal continuum is observed in the 23 October data, that we associate with the nucleus thermal light curve. The nucleus contributes up to 30-55 % of the observed continuum. The large dust-to-gas ratio (in the range 2-6) can be explained by the unusual activity of the comet for its size, which allows decimeter size particles and large boulders to be entrained by the gas. The rotational temperature of CH3OH is measured. We attribute the increase from 35 to 46 K with increasing beam size (from 150 to 1500 km) to radiative processes. The HCN production rate displays strong rotation-induced variations. The HCN production curve, as well as those of CO2 and H2O measured by EPOXI, are interpreted with a geometric model which takes into account the rotation and the shape of the comet. The HCN and H2O production curves are in phase, showing common sources. The 1.7h delay, in average, of HCN and H2O with respect to the CO2 production curve suggests that HCN and H2O are mainly produced by subliming icy grains. The scale length of production of HCN is determined to be on the order of 500-1000 km, implying a mean velocity of 100-200 m/s for the icy grains producing HCN. The modulation of the CO2 prouction and of the velocity offset of the HCN lines are interpreted in terms of localized sources of gas on the nucleus surface.
  • The line emission in the coma was measured in the comets C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), that were observed on five consecutive nights, 7-11 May 2004, at heliocentric distances of 1.0 and 0.7 AU, respectively, by means of high-resolution spectroscopy using the 10-m Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). We present a search for six parent- and product-volatile species (HCN, H2CO, CO, CS, CH3OH, and HNC) in both comets. Multiline observations of the CH3OH J = 5-4 series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We derive rotational temperatures of 54(9) K for C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) and 119(34) K for C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) that are roughly consistent with observations of other comets at similar distances from the Sun. The gas production rates of material are computed using a spherically symmetric molecular excitation code that includes collisions between neutrals and electrons. We find an HCN production rate of 2.96(5)e26 molec.s-1 for comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), corresponding to a mixing ratio with respect to H2O of 1.12(2)e-3. The mean HCN production rate during the observing period is 4.54(10)e26 molec.s-1 for comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR), which gives a Q_HCN/Q_H2O mixing ratio of 1.51(3)e-3. With systematically lower mixing ratios in comet C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), production rate ratios of the observed species with respect to H2O lie within the typical ranges of dynamically new comets in both objects. We find a relative low abundance of CO in C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) compared to the observed range in other comets based on millimeter/submillimeter observations, and a significant upper limit on the CO production in C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) is derived. Depletion of CO suggests partial evaporation from the surface layers during previous visits to the outer Solar System and agrees with previous measurements of dynamically new comets.
  • The 15N isotopologue abundance ratio measured today in different bodies of the solar system is thought to be connected to 15N-fractionation effects that would have occured in the protosolar nebula. The present study aims at putting constraints on the degree of 15N-fractionation that occurs during the prestellar phase, through observations of D, 13C and 15N-substituted isotopologues towards B1b. Both molecules from the nitrogen hydride family, i.e. N2H+ and NH3, and from the nitrile family, i.e. HCN, HNC and CN, are considered in the analysis. As a first step, we model the continuum emission in order to derive the physical structure of the cloud, i.e. gas temperature and H2 density. These parameters are subsequently used as an input in a non-local radiative transfer model to infer the radial abundances profiles of the various molecules. Our modeling shows that all the molecules are affected by depletion onto dust grains, in the region that encompasses the B1-bS and B1-bN cores. While high levels of deuterium fractionation are derived, we conclude that no fractionation occurs in the case of the nitrogen chemistry. Independently of the chemical family, the molecular abundances are consistent with 14N/15N~300, a value representative of the elemental atomic abundances of the parental gas. The inefficiency of the 15N-fractionation effects in the B1b region can be linked to the relatively high gas temperature ~17K which is representative of the innermost part of the cloud. Since this region shows signs of depletion onto dust grains, we can not exclude the possibility that the molecules were previously enriched in 15N, earlier in the B1b history, and that such an enrichment could have been incorporated into the ice mantles. It is thus necessary to repeat this kind of study in colder sources to test such a possibility.
  • Little is known about the physical properties of the nuclei of Oort cloud comets. Measuring the thermal emission of a nucleus is one of the few means for deriving its size and constraining some of its thermal properties. We attempted to measure the nucleus size of the Oort cloud comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd). We used the Plateau de Bure Interferometer to measure the millimetric thermal emission of this comet at 157 GHz (1.9 mm) and 266 GHz (1.1 mm). Whereas the observations at 266 GHz were not usable due to bad atmospheric conditions, we derived a 3-sigma upper limit on the comet continuum emission of 0.41 mJy at 157 GHz. Using a thermal model for a spherical nucleus with standard thermal parameters, we found an upper limit of 5.6 km for the radius. The dust contribution to our signal is estimated to be negligible. Given the water production rates measured for this comet and our upper limit, we estimated that Garradd was very active, with an active fraction of its nucleus larger than 50%.
  • We present Herschel observations of water isotopologues in the atmosphere of the Jupiter-family comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova. No HDO emission is detected, with a 3 sigma upper limit of 2.0 10-4 for the D/H ratio. This value is consistent with the earlier Herschel measurement in the Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2. The canonical value of 3 10-4 measured pre-Herschel in a sample of Oort-cloud comets can be excluded at a 4.5 sigma level. The observations presented here further confirm that a diversity of D/H ratios exists in the comet population and emphasize the need for additional measurements with future ground-based facilities, such as CCAT, in the post-Herschel era.
  • 176P/LINEAR is a member of the new cometary class known as main-belt comets (MBCs). It displayed cometary activity shortly during its 2005 perihelion passage that may be driven by the sublimation of sub-surface ices. We have therefore searched for emission of the H2O 110-101 ground state rotational line at 557 GHz toward 176P/LINEAR with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) on board the Herschel Space Observatory on UT 8.78 August 2011, about 40 days after its most recent perihelion passage, when the object was at a heliocentric distance of 2.58 AU. No H2O line emission was detected in our observations, from which we derive sensitive 3-sigma upper limits for the water production rate and column density of < 4e25 molec/s and of < 3e10 cm^{-2}, respectively. From the peak brightness measured during the object's active period in 2005, this upper limit is lower than predicted by the relation between production rates and visual magnitudes observed for a sample of comets by Jorda et al. (2008) at this heliocentric distance. Thus, 176P/LINEAR was likely less active at the time of our observation than during its previous perihelion passage. The retrieved upper limit is lower than most values derived for the H2O production rate from the spectroscopic search for CN emission in MBCs.
  • We aim to determine the production rates of several parent and product volatiles and the 12C/13C isotopic carbon ratio in the long-period comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), which is likely to originate from the Oort Cloud. The line emission from several molecules in the coma was measured with high signal-to-noise ratio in January 2005 at heliocentric distance of 1.2 AU by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). We have obtained production rates of several volatiles (CH3OH, HCN, H13CN, HNC, H2CO, CO and CS) by comparing the observed and simulated line-integrated intensities. Furthermore, multiline observations of the CH3OH (7-6) series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We find that the CH3OH population distribution of the levels sampled by these lines can be described by a rotational temperature of 40 \pm 3 K. Derived mixing ratios relative to hydrogen cyanide are CO/CH3OH/H2CO/CS/HNC/H13CN/HCN = 30.9/24.6/4.8/0.57/0.031/0.013/1 assuming a pointing offset of 8" due to the uncertain ephemeris at the time of the observations and the telescope pointing error. The measured relative molecular abundances in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) are between low- to typical values of those obtained in Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that it has visited the inner solar system previously and undergone thermal processing. The HNC/HCN abundance ratio of ~3.1% is comparable to that found in other comets, accounting for the dependence on the heliocentric distance, and could possibly be explained by ion-molecule chemical processes in the low-temperature atmosphere. From a tentative H13CN detection, the measured value of 97 \pm 30 for the H12CN/H13CN isotopologue pair is consistent with a telluric value.
  • The D/H ratio in cometary water is believed to be an important indicator of the conditions under which icy planetesimals formed and can provide clues to the contribution of comets to the delivery of water and other volatiles to Earth. Available measurements suggest that there is isotopic diversity in the comet population. The Herschel Space Observatory revealed an ocean-like ratio in the Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2, whereas most values measured in Oort-cloud comets are twice as high as the ocean D/H ratio. We present here a new measurement of the D/H ratio in the water of an Oort-cloud comet. HDO, H_2O, and H_2^18O lines were observed with high signal-to-noise ratio in comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) using the Herschel HIFI instrument. Spectral maps of two water lines were obtained to constrain the water excitation. The D/H ratio derived from the measured H_2^16O and HDO production rates is 2.06+/-0.22 X 10**-4. This result shows that the D/H in the water of Oort-cloud comets is not as high as previously thought, at least for a fraction of the population, hence the paradigm of a single, archetypal D/H ratio for all Oort-cloud comets is no longer tenable. Nevertheless, the value measured in C/2009 P1 (Garradd) is significantly higher than the Earth's ocean value of 1.558 X 10**-4. The measured H_2^16O/H_2^18O ratio of 523+/-32 is, however, consistent with the terrestrial value.
  • Comet 17P/Holmes underwent a dramatic outburst in October 2007, caused by the sudden fragmentation of its nucleus and the production of a large quantity of grains scattering sunlight. We report on 90 GHz continuum observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer on 27.1 and 28.2 October 2007 UT, i.e., 4-5 days after the outburst. These observations probed the thermal radiation of large dust particles, and therefore provide the best constraints on the mass in the ejecta debris. The thermal emission of the debris was modelled and coupled to a time-dependent description of their expansion after the outburst. The analysis was performed in the Fourier plane. Visibilities were computed for the two observing dates and compared to the data to measure their velocity and mass. Optical data and 250-GHz continuum measurements published in the literature were used to further constrain the dust kinematics and size distribution. Two distinct dust components in terms of kinematic properties are identified in the data. The large-velocity component, with typical velocities V0 of 50-100 m/s for 1 mm particles, displays a steep size distribution with a size index estimated to q = -3.7 (\pm0.1), assuming a minimum grain size of 0.1 \mum. It corresponds to the fast expanding shell observed in optical images. The slowly-moving "core" component (V0 = 7-9 m/s) detected near the nucleus has a size index |q| < 3.4 and contains a higher proportion of large particles than the shell. The dust mass in the core is in the range 0.1-1 that of the shell. Using optical constants pertaining to porous grains (50% porosity) made of astronomical silicates mixed with water ice (48% in mass), the total dust mass Mdust injected by the outburst is estimated to 4-14 x 10**11 kg, corresponding to 3-9% the nucleus mass.
  • The Jupiter-family comet 10P/Tempel 2 was observed during its 2010 return with the Herschel Space Observatory. We present here the observation of the (J, K) = (1, 0)-(0, 0) transition of ammonia at 572 GHz in this comet with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) of Herschel. We also report on radio observations of other molecules (HCN, CH3OH, H2S and CS) obtained during the 1999 return of the comet with the CSO telescope and the JCMT, and during its 2010 return with the IRAM 30-m telescope. Molecular abundances relative to water are 0.09%, 1.8%, 0.4%, and 0.08% for HCN, CH3OH, H2S, and CS, respectively. An abundance of 0.5% for NH3 is obtained, which is similar to the values measured in other comets. The hyperfine structure of the ammonia line is resolved for the first time in an astronomical source. Strong anisotropy in the outgassing is present in all observations from 1999 to 2010 and is modelled to derive the production rates.