• A survey is presented on the current status of 3D nucleon tomography. Several research frontiers are addressed that dominate modern physics from theory to current and future experiments. We have now a much more detailed spatial image of the nucleon thanks to various theoretical concepts and methods to describe its charge distribution and spin decomposition which are highlighted here. The progress of lattice computations of these quantities is reported and the prospects of what we can come to expect in the near future are discussed. Multi-dimensional maps of the nucleon's partonic structure appear now within reach of forthcoming experiments.
  • We consider the pion-photon transition form factor at low to intermediate spacelike momenta within the theoretical framework of light-cone sum rules. We derive predictions which take into account all currently known contributions stemming from QCD perturbation theory up to the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) and by including all twist terms up to order six. In order to enable a more detailed comparison with forthcoming high-precision data, we also estimate the main systematic theoretical uncertainties, stemming from various sources, and discuss their influence on the calculations --- in particular the dominant one related to the still uncalculated part of the NNLO contribution. The analysis addresses, in broad terms, also the role of the twist-two pion distribution amplitude derived with different approaches.
  • Using QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates, we show that the distribution amplitude of the longitudinally polarized $\rho$-meson may have a shorttailed platykurtic profile in close analogy to our recently proposed platykurtic distribution amplitude for the pion. Such a chimera distribution de facto amalgamates the broad unimodal profile of the distribution amplitude, obtained with a Dyson-Schwinger equations-based computational scheme, with the suppressed tails characterizing the bimodal distribution amplitudes derived from QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates. We argue that pattern formation, emerging from the collective synchronization of coupled oscillators, can provide a single theoretical scaffolding to study unimodal and bimodal distribution amplitudes of light mesons without recourse to particular computational schemes and the reasons for them.
  • We consider the calculation of the pion-photon transition form factor $F^{\gamma^*\gamma\pi^0}(Q^2)$ within light-cone sum rules focusing attention to the low-mid region of momenta. The central aim is to estimate the theoretical uncertainties which originate from a wide variety of sources related to (i) the relevance of next-to-next-to-leading order radiative corrections (ii) the influence of the twist-four and the twist-six term (iii) the sensitivity of the results on auxiliary parameters, like the Borel scale $M^2$, (iv) the role of the phenomenological description of resonances, and (v) the significance of a small but finite virtuality of the quasireal photon. Predictions for $F^{\gamma^*\gamma\pi^0}(Q^2)$ are presented which include all these uncertainties and found to comply within the margin of experimental error with the existing data in the $Q^2$ range between 1 and 5 GeV$^2$, thus justifying the reliability of the applied calculational scheme. This provides a solid basis for confronting theoretical predictions with forthcoming data bearing small statistical errors.
  • The aim of this topical article is to outline the fundamental ideas underlying the recently developed Fractional Analytic Perturbation Theory (FAPT) of QCD and present its main calculational tools together with key applications. For this, it is first necessary to review previous methods to apply QCD perturbation theory at low spacelike momentum scales, where the influence of the Landau singularities becomes inevitable. Several concepts are considered and their limitations are pointed out. The usefulness of FAPT is discussed in terms of two characteristic hadronic quantities: the perturbatively calculable part of the pion's electromagnetic form factor in the spacelike region and the Higgs-boson decay into a $b\bar b$ pair in the timelike region. In the first case, the focus is on the optimization of the prediction with respect to the choice of the renormalization scheme and the dependence on the renormalization and the factorization scales. The second case serves to show that the application of FAPT to this reaction reaches already at the four-loop level an accuracy of the order of 1%, avoiding difficulties inherent in the standard perturbative expansion. The obtained results are compared with estimates from fixed-order and contour-improved QCD perturbation theory. Using the brand-new Higgs mass value of about 125 GeV, measured at the Large Hadron Collider (CERN), a prediction for $\Gamma_{H\to b\bar{b}}=2.4 \pm 0.15 {\rm MeV}$ is extracted.
  • The pion-photon transition form factor is studied by employing two types of Sum Rules: Light Cone Sum Rules (LCSR) and Anomaly Sum Rules (ASR). By comparing the predictions for the pion-photon transition form factor, obtained from these two approaches, the applicability limit of the LCSRs at low momenta is determined. Reciprocally, the ASR threshold dependence on the momentum was extracted using our LCSR-based method in combination with two different types of pion distribution amplitudes and found that at higher Q2 it approaches a constant.
  • We provide an in-depth analysis of the $\pi$ distribution amplitude in terms of two different Gegenbauer representations. Detailed predictions for the $\pi-\gamma$ transition form factor are presented, obtained with light-cone sum rules. Various $\pi$ distribution amplitudes are tested and the crucial role of their endpoint behavior in the form-factor analysis is discussed. Comparison with the data is given.
  • The binding effects of quarks within hadrons are discussed in terms of the pion distribution amplitude over longitudinal momentum fractions. To understand the behavior of this quantity at different momentum scales, the concept of synchronization in complex systems has been employed. It is argued that at low momentum scales, the quarks get correlated by nonlocal quark/gluon condensates that cause an endpoint-suppressed, mainly bimodal structure of the pion distribution amplitude inferred from a sum-rule analysis. The mass generation mechanism, within the framework of Dyson-Schwinger equations, and evolution effects pull these two peaks back to the center to form at $Q^2\to\infty$ the asymptotic distribution amplitude which represents the most synchronized $\bar{q}q$ state.
  • We highlight the progress, current status, and open challenges of QCD-driven physics, in theory and in experiment. We discuss how the strong interaction is intimately connected to a broad sweep of physical problems, in settings ranging from astrophysics and cosmology to strongly-coupled, complex systems in particle and condensed-matter physics, as well as to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. We also discuss how success in describing the strong interaction impacts other fields, and, in turn, how such subjects can impact studies of the strong interaction. In the course of the work we offer a perspective on the many research streams which flow into and out of QCD, as well as a vision for future developments.
  • Detailed predictions for the scaled pion-photon transition form factor are given, derived with the method of light-cone sum rules and using pion distribution amplitudes with two and three Gegenbauer coefficients obtained from QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates. These predictions agree well with all experimental data that are compatible with QCD scaling (and collinear factorization), but disagree with the high-$Q^2$ data of the BaBar Collaboration that grow with the momentum. A good agreement of our predictions with results obtained from AdS/QCD models and Dyson-Schwinger computations is found.
  • The leading-twist distribution amplitude for the longitudinal rho-meson was studied using QCD Sum Rules with nonlocal condensates and a spectral density which includes next-to-leading order radiative corrections. The obtained profile is compared with results from standard QCD sum rules, lattice QCD, holographic QCD, a light-front quark model, and the instanton liquid model. Preliminary estimates for the first two moments of the transverse $\rho$-meson distribute amplitude are also given.
  • A state-of-the-art analysis of the pion-photon transition form factor is presented based on an improved theoretical calculation that includes the effect of a finite virtuality of the quasi-real photon in the method of light-cone sum rules. We carry out a detailed statistical analysis of the existing experimental data using this method and by employing pion distribution amplitudes with up to three Gegenbauer coefficients $a_2, a_4, a_6$. Allowing for an error range in the coefficient $a_6\approx 0$, the theoretical predictions for $\gamma^*\gamma\to\pi^0$ obtained with nonlocal QCD sum rules are found to be in good agreement with all data that support a scaling behavior of the transition form factor at higher $Q^2$, like those of the Belle Collaboration. The data on $\gamma^*\gamma\to\eta/\eta'$ from CLEO and \babar are also reproduced, while there is a strong conflict with the auxetic trend of the \babar data above 10 GeV$^2$. The broader implications of these findings are discussed.
  • We extract constraints on the pion distribution amplitude from available data on the pion-photon transition form factor in the framework of light-cone sum rules. A pronounced discrepancy $(2.7-3)\sigma$ between the Gegenbauer expansion coefficients extracted from the CELLO, CLEO, and Belle experimental data relative to those from BaBar is found. Predictions for the pion-photon transition form factor are presented by employing a pion distribution amplitude obtained long ago from QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates. These predictions comply with the Belle data but disagree with those of BaBar beyond 9 GeV$^2$.
  • We present an extended analysis of the data for the pion-photon transition form factor from different experiments, CELLO, CLEO, and BaBar, and discuss various theoretical approaches which try to reason from them. We focus on the divergent behavior of the BaBar data for the pion and those for the $\eta(\eta')$ pseudoscalar mesons and comment on recently proposed explanations for this discrepancy. We argue that it is not possible at present to accommodate these data within the standard QCD framework self-consistently.
  • This report attempts to capture the essential workings of gauge links (Wilson lines) inside gauge-invariant formulations of parton distribution functions in QCD and gain some deeper insight into their key (renormalization) properties. We show, in particular, that the one-loop anomalous dimension of the Cherednikov-Stefanis quark TMD PDF is in the lightcone gauge $A^+=0$, combined with the Mandelstam--Leibbrandt pole prescription, the same as that obtained in the special covariant gauge $a=-3$, leaving no uncanceled rapidity singularities.
  • The new data on the $\gamma^*\gamma \to \pi^0$ transition form factor of the Belle Collaboration are analyzed in comparison with those of BaBar (including the older data of CELLO and CLEO) using an approach based on light-cone sum rules. Performing a 2-, and a 3-parametric fit to these data, we found that the Belle and the BaBar data have no overlap at the $1\sigma$ level. While the Belle data agree with our predictions, the Babar data are in conflict with them.
  • We perform a comparative theoretical study of the data at spacelike momentum transfer for the $\gamma^*\gamma\to\pi^0$ transition form factor, just reported by the Belle Collaboration, vs. those published before by BaBar, also including the older CLEO and CELLO data. Various implications for the structure of the $\pi^0$ distribution amplitude vis-\`a-vis those data are discussed and the existing theoretical predictions are classified into three distinct categories. We argue that the actual bifurcation of the data with antithetic trends is artificial and reason that the Belle data are the better option.
  • We discuss the possibility of quantum entanglement for pairs of charged particles produced in high-energy $pp$-collisions at the LHC. Using a framework of interacting Wilson lines, we calculate 2-D and 1-D two-particle angular correlation functions in terms of the differences of the pseudorapidities and azimuthal angles of the produced particles. The calculated near-side angular correlation shows a localized maximum around $\Delta\phi \approx 0$, though it is less pronounced compared to the peak observed by the CMS Collaboration. We argue that this soft correlation is universal and insensitive to the specific properties of the matter (quark-gluon plasma, QCD vacuum, etc.) used to describe hadronic states---though such properties can be included to further improve the results.
  • We discuss the possibility of non-minimal gauge invariance of transverse-momentum-dependent parton densities (TMDs) that allows direct access to the spin degrees of freedom of fermion fields entering the operator definition of (quark) TMDs. This is achieved via enhanced Wilson lines that are supplied with the spin-dependent Pauli term $\sim F^{\mu\nu}[\gamma_\mu, \gamma_\nu]$, thus providing an appropriate tool for the "microscopic" investigation of the spin and color structure of TMDs. We show that this generalization leaves the leading-twist TMD properties unchanged but modifies those of twist three by contributing to their anomalous dimensions. We also comment on Collins' recent criticism of our approach.
  • D. Boer, M. Diehl, R. Milner, R. Venugopalan, W. Vogelsang, A. Accardi, E. Aschenauer, M. Burkardt, R. Ent, V. Guzey, D. Hasch, K. Kumar, M. A. C. Lamont, Y. Li, W. J. Marciano, C. Marquet, F. Sabatie, M. Stratmann, F. Yuan, S. Abeyratne, S. Ahmed, C. Aidala, S. Alekhin, M. Anselmino, H. Avakian, A. Bacchetta, J. Bartels, H. BC, J. Beebe-Wang, S. Belomestnykh, I. Ben-Zvi, G. Beuf, J. Blumlein, M . Blaskiewicz, A. Bogacz, S. J. Brodsky, T. Burton, R. Calaga, X. Chang, I. O. Cherednikov, P. Chevtsov, G. A. Chirilli, C. Ciofi degli Atti, I. C. Cloet, A. Cooper-Sarkar, R. Debbe, Ya. Derbenev, A. Deshpande, F. Dominguez, A. Dumitru, R. Dupre, B. Erdelyi, C. Faroughy, S. Fazio, A. Fedotov, J. R. Forshaw, R. Geraud, K. Gallmeister, L. Gamberg, J.-H. Gao, D. Gassner, F. Gelis, G. P. Gilfoyle, G. Goldstein, K. Golec-Biernat, V. P. Goncalves, M. Gonderinger, M. Guzzi, P. Hagler, H. Hahn, L. Hammons, Y. Hao, P. He, T. Horn, W. A. Horowitz, M. Huang, A. Hutton, B. Jager, W. Jackson, A. Jain, E. C. Johnson, Z.-B. Kang, L. P. Kaptari, D. Kayran, J. Kewisch, Y. Koike, A. Kondratenko, B. Z. Kopeliovich, Y. V. Kovchegov, G. Krafft, P. Kroll, S. Kumano, K. Kumericki, T. Lappi, T. Lautenschlager, R. Li, Z.-T. Liang, V. N. Litvinenko, S. Liuti, Y. Luo, D. Muller, G. Mahler, A. Majumder, S. Manikonda, F. Marhauser, G. McIntyre, M. Meskauskas, W. Meng, A. Metz, C. B. Mezzetti, G. A. Miller, M. Minty, S.-O. Moch, V. Morozov, U. Mosel, L. Motyka, H. Moutarde, P. J. Mulders, B. Musch, P. Nadel-Turonski, P. Nadolsky, F. Olness, P. N. Ostrumov, B. Parker, B. Pasquini, K. Passek-Kumericki, A. Pikin, F. Pilat, B. Pire, H. Pirner, C. Pisano, E. Pozdeyev, A. Prokudin, V. Ptitsyn, X. Qian, J.-W. Qiu, M. Radici, A. Radyushkin, T. Rao, R. Rimmer, F. Ringer, S. Riordan, T. Rogers, J. Rojo, T. Roser, R. Sandapen, R. Sassot, T. Satogata, H. Sayed, A. Schafer, G. Schnell, P. Schweitzer, B. Sheehy, J. Skaritka, G. Soyez, M. Spata, H. Spiesberger, A. M. Stasto, N. G. Stefanis, M. Strikman, M. Sullivan, L. Szymanowski, K. Tanaka, S. Taneja, S. Tepikian, B. Terzic, Y. Than, T. Toll, D. Trbojevic, E. Tsentalovich, N. Tsoupas, K. Tuchin, J. Tuozzolo, T. Ullrich, A. Vossen, S. Wallon, G. Wang, H. Wang, X.-N. Wang, S. Webb, C. Weiss, Q. Wu, B.-W. Xiao, W. Xu, B. Yunn, A. Zelenski, Y. Zhang, J. Zhou, P. Zurita
    Nov. 28, 2011 hep-ph, nucl-ex, nucl-th
    This report is based on a ten-week program on "Gluons and the quark sea at high-energies", which took place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory in Seattle in Fall 2010. The principal aim of the program was to develop and sharpen the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), a facility that will be able to collide electrons and positrons with polarized protons and with light to heavy nuclei at high energies, offering unprecedented possibilities for in-depth studies of quantum chromodynamics. This report is organized around four major themes: i) the spin and flavor structure of the proton, ii) three-dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space, iii) QCD matter in nuclei, and iv) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Beginning with an executive summary, the report contains tables of key measurements, chapter overviews for each of the major scientific themes, and detailed individual contributions on various aspects of the scientific opportunities presented by an EIC.
  • An analysis of all available data (CELLO, CLEO, \babar) in the range $[1\div 40]$ GeV$^2$ for the pion-photon transition form factor in terms of light-cone sum rules with next-to-leading-order accuracy is discussed, including twist-four contributions and next-to-next-to-leading order and twist-six corrections---the latter two via uncertainties. The antithetic trend between the \babar data for the $\gamma^*\gamma\pi^0$ and those for the $\gamma^*\gamma\eta(\eta')$ transition is pointed out, emphasizing the underlying antagonistic mechanisms: endpoint enhancement for the first and endpoint-suppression for the second---each associated with pseudoscalar meson distribution amplitudes with distinct endpoint characteristics.
  • A global fit to the data from different collaborations (CELLO, CLEO, BaBar) on the pion-photon transition form factor is carried out using light-cone sum rules. The analysis includes the next-to-leading QCD radiative corrections and the twist-four contributions, while the main next-to-next-to-leading term and the twist-six contribution are taken into account in the form of theoretical uncertainties. We use the information extracted from the data to investigate the pivotal characteristics of the pion distribution amplitude. This is done by dividing the data into two sets: one containing all data up to 9 GeV$^2$, whereas the other incorporates also the high-$Q^2$ tail of the BaBar data. We find that it is not possible to accommodate into the fit these BaBar data points with the same accuracy and conclude that it is difficult to explain these data in the standard scheme of OCD.
  • We perform a detailed analysis of all existing data (CELLO, CLEO, BaBar) on the pion-photon transition form factor by means of light-cone sum rules in which we include the NLO QCD radiative corrections and the twist-four contributions. The NNLO radiative correction together with the twist-six contribution are also taken into account in terms of theoretical uncertainties. Keeping only the first two Gegenbauer coefficients $a_2$ and $a_4$, we show that the $1\sigma$ error ellipse of all data up to 9 GeV$^2$ greatly overlaps with the set of pion distribution amplitudes obtained from nonlocal QCD sum rules---within the range of uncertainties due to twist-four. This remains valid also for the projection of the $1\sigma$ error ellipsoid on the $(a_2,a_4)$ plane when including $a_6$. We argue that it is not possible to accommodate the high-$Q^2$ tail of the BaBar data with the same accuracy, despite opposite claims by other authors, and conclude that the BaBar data still pose a challenge to QCD.
  • The transition pion-photon form factor is studied within the framework of Light-Cone QCD Sum Rules. The spectral density for the next-to-leading order corrections is calculated for any Gegenbauer harmonic. At the level of the next-to-next-to-leading (NNLO) radiative corrections, only that part of the hard-scattering amplitude is included that is proportional to the $\beta$-function, taking into account the leading zeroth-order harmonic. The relative size of the NNLO contribution in the prediction for the form factor $F^{\gamma^{*}\gamma\pi}(Q^2)$ has been analyzed, making use of the BLM scale-setting procedure. In addition, predictions for the form factor $F^{\gamma^{*}\rho\pi}$ are obtained that turn out to be sensitive to the endpoint behavior of the pion distribution amplitude, thus providing in connection with experimental data an additional adjudicator for the pion distribution amplitude. In a note added, we comment on the preliminary high-$Q^2$ BaBar data on $F^{\gamma^{*}\gamma\pi}$ arguing that the significant growth of the form factor between 10 and 40 GeV$^2$ cannot be explained in terms of higher-order perturbative corrections at the NNLO.
  • We discuss the end-point behavior of the pion distribution amplitude (DA) and calculate its slope using QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates. This is done in terms of the standard derivative and also with the help of an "integral derivative", recently obtained by us. Our approach favors a value of the slope of the order (or less) of the asymptotic DA and is in clear disagreement with flat-type pion DAs.