• Laser photons traveling through a plasma can be considered to acquire an effective mass. This modifies the well-known Volkov states of an electron dressed by a strong laser-field propagating through a plasma from the vacuum case and consequently all quantum electrodynamical effects triggered by the electron. Here we present an in-depth study of the basic process of photon emission by an electron scattered from an intense short laser pulse inside a plasma, labeled nonlinear Compton scattering, based on modified Volkov solutions derived from first principles. Consequences of the massive photon effects on the Compton spectra of emitted photons and implications for the high-intensity laser-plasma experiments are pointed out.
  • Materials with strongly-correlated electrons exhibit interesting phenomena such as metal-insulator transitions and high-temperature superconductivity. In stark contrast to ordinary metals, electron transport in these materials is thought to resemble the flow of viscous fluids. Despite their differences, it is predicted that transport in both, conventional and correlated materials, is fundamentally limited by the uncertainty principle applied to energy dissipation. Here we discover hydrodynamic electron flow in the Weyl-semimetal tungsten phosphide (WP2). Using thermal and magneto-electric transport experiments, we observe the transition from a conventional metallic state, at higher temperatures, to a hydrodynamic electron fluid below 20 K. The hydrodynamic regime is characterized by a viscosity-induced dependence of the electrical resistivity on the square of the channel width, and by the observation of a strong violation of the Wiedemann-Franz law. From magneto-hydrodynamic experiments and complementary Hall measurements, the relaxation times for momentum and thermal energy dissipating processes are extracted. Following the uncertainty principle, both are limited by the Planckian bound of dissipation, independent of the underlying transport regime.
  • We report the results of our numerical simulation of classical-dissipative dynamics of a charged particle subjected to a non-markovian stochastic forcing. We find that the system develops a steady-state orbital magnetic moment in the presence of a static magnetic field. Very significantly, the sign of the orbital magnetic moment turns out to be {\it paramagnetic} for our choice of parameters, varied over a wide range. This is shown specifically for the case of classical dynamics driven by a Kubo-Anderson type non-markovian noise. Natural spatial boundary condition was imposed through (1) a soft (harmonic) confining potential, and (2) a hard potential, approximating a reflecting wall. There was no noticeable qualitative difference. What appears to be crucial to the orbital magnetic effect noticed here is the non-markovian property of the driving noise chosen. Experimental realization of this effect on the laboratory scale, and its possible implications are briefly discussed. We would like to emphasize that the above steady-state classical orbital paramagnetic moment complements, rather than contradicts the Bohr-van Leeuwen (BvL) theorem on the absence of classical orbital diamagnetism in thermodynamic equilibrium.
  • We present the discovery of 816 high amplitude infrared variable stars ($\Delta K_{\rm s} >$ 1 mag) in 119 deg$^2$ of the Galactic midplane covered by the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) survey. Almost all are new discoveries and about 50$\%$ are YSOs. This provides further evidence that YSOs are the commonest high amplitude infrared variable stars in the Galactic plane. In the 2010-2014 time series of likely YSOs we find that the amplitude of variability increases towards younger evolutionary classes (class I and flat-spectrum sources) except on short timescales ($<$25 days) where this trend is reversed. Dividing the likely YSOs by light curve morphology, we find 106 with eruptive light curves, 45 dippers, 39 faders, 24 eclipsing binaries, 65 long-term periodic variables (P$>$100 days) and 162 short-term variables. Eruptive YSOs and faders tend to have the highest amplitudes and eruptive systems have the reddest SEDs. Follow up spectroscopy in a companion paper verifies high accretion rates in the eruptive systems. Variable extinction is disfavoured by the 2 epochs of colour data. These discoveries increase the number of eruptive variable YSOs by a factor of at least 5, most being at earlier stages of evolution than the known FUor and EXor types. We find that eruptive variability is at least an order of magnitude more common in class I YSOs than class II YSOs. Typical outburst durations are 1 to 4 years, between those of EXors and FUors. They occur in 3 to 6\% of class I YSOs over a 4 year time span.
  • In a companion work (Paper I) we detected a large population of highly variable Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) survey, typically with class I or flat spectrum spectral energy distributions and diverse light curve types. Here we present infrared spectra (0.9--2.5 $\mu$m) of 37 of these variables, many of them observed in a bright state. The spectra confirm that 15/18 sources with eruptive light curves have signatures of a high accretion rate, either showing EXor-like emission features ($\Delta$v=2 CO, Br$\gamma$) and/or FUor-like features ($\Delta$v=2 CO and H$_{2}$O strongly in absorption). Similar features were seen in some long term periodic YSOs and faders but not in dippers or short-term variables. The sample includes some dusty Mira variables (typically distinguished by smooth Mira-like light curves), 2 cataclysmic variables and a carbon star. In total we have added 19 new objects to the broad class of eruptive variable YSOs with episodic accretion. Eruptive variable YSOs in our sample that were observed at bright states show higher accretion luminosities than the rest of the sample. Most of the eruptive variables differ from the established FUor and EXor subclasses, showing intermediate outburst durations and a mixture of their spectroscopic characteristics. This is in line with a small number of other recent discoveries. Since these previously atypical objects are now the majority amongst embedded members of the class, we propose a new classification for them as MNors. This term (pronounced emnor) follows V1647 Ori, the illuminating star of McNeil's Nebula.
  • Recently, the existence of massless chiral (Weyl) fermions has been postulated in a class of semi-metals with a non-trivial energy dispersion.These materials are now commonly dubbed Weyl semi-metals (WSM).One predicted property of Weyl fermions is the chiral or Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly, a chirality imbalance in the presence of parallel magnetic and electric fields. In WSM, it is expected to induce a negative longitudinal magnetoresistance (NMR), the chiral magnetic effect.Here, we present experimental evidence that the observation of the chiral magnetic effect can be hindered by an effect called "current jetting". This effect also leads to a strong apparent NMR, but it is characterized by a highly non-uniform current distribution inside the sample. It appears in materials possessing a large field-induced anisotropy of the resistivity tensor, such as almost compensated high-mobility semimetals due to the orbital effect.In case of a non-homogeneous current injection, the potential distribution is strongly distorted in the sample.As a consequence, an experimentally measured potential difference is not proportional to the intrinsic resistance.Our results on the MR of the WSM candidate materials NbP, NbAs, TaAs, TaP exhibit distinct signatures of an inhomogeneous current distribution, such as a field-induced "zero resistance' and a strong dependence of the `measured resistance" on the position, shape, and type of the voltage and current contacts on the sample. A misalignment between the current and the magnetic-field directions can even induce a "negative resistance". Finite-element simulations of the potential distribution inside the sample, using typical resistance anisotropies, are in good agreement with the experimental findings. Our study demonstrates that great care must be taken before interpreting measurements of a NMR as evidence for the chiral anomaly in putative Weyl semimetals.
  • This report describes the conceptual steps in reaching the design of the AWAKE experiment currently under construction at CERN. We start with an introduction to plasma wakefield acceleration and the motivation for using proton drivers. We then describe the self-modulation instability --- a key to an early realization of the concept. This is then followed by the historical development of the experimental design, where the critical issues that arose and their solutions are described. We conclude with the design of the experiment as it is being realized at CERN and some words on the future outlook. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status as presented in this conference is given in [1].
  • In this paper, we present results of TeV $\gamma$--ray observations of the high synchrotron peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1218+304 (z=0.182) with the $TACTIC$ (TeV Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope with Imaging Camera). The observations are primarily motivated by the unusually hard GeV-TeV spectrum of the source despite its relatively large redshift. The source is observed in the TeV energy range with the $TACTIC$ from March 1, 2013 to April 15, 2013 (MJD 56352--56397) for a total observation time of 39.62 h and no evidence of TeV $\gamma$--ray activity is found from the source. The corresponding 99$\%$ confidence level upper limit on the integral flux above a threshold energy of 1.1 TeV is estimated to be 3.41 $\times10^{-12}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (i.e $<23\%$ Crab Nebula flux) assuming a power law differential energy spectrum with photon index 3.0, as previously observed by the $MAGIC$ and $VERITAS$ telescopes. For the study of multi-wavelength emission from the source, we use nearly simultaneous optical, UV and and X--ray data collected by the UVOT and XRT instruments on board the \emph{Swift} satellite and high energy $\gamma$--ray data collected by the Large Area Telescope on board the \emph{Fermi} satellite. We also use radio data at 15 GHz from OVRO 40 m telescope in the same period. No significant increase of activity is detected from radio to TeV $\gamma$--rays from 1ES1218+304 during the period from March 1, 2013 to April 15, 2013.
  • We investigate the electronic structure of CaFe$_2$As$_2$ using high resolution photoemission spectroscopy. Experimental results exhibit three energy bands crossing the Fermi level making hole pockets around the $\Gamma$-point. Temperature variation reveal a gradual shift of an energy band away from the Fermi level with the decrease in temperature in addition to the spin density wave (SDW) transition induced Fermi surface reconstruction of the second energy band across SDW transition temperature. The hole pocket in the former case eventually disappears at lower temperatures while the hole Fermi surface of the third energy band possessing finite $p$ orbital character survives till the lowest temperature studied. These results reveal signature of a complex charge redistribution among various energy bands as a function of temperature that might be associated to the exotic properties of this system.
  • Light Wave transmission -- its compression, amplification, and the optical energy storage -- in an Ultra Slow Wave Medium (USWM) is studied analytically. Our phenomenological treatment is based entirely on the continuity equation for the optical energy flux, and the well known distribution-product property of Dirac delta-function. The results so obtained provide a clear understanding of some recent experiments on light transmission and its complete stoppage in an USWM. Keywords : Ultra slow light, stopped light, slow wave medium, EIT.
  • We present an analytical treatment of the dissipative-stochastic dynamics of a charged classical particle confined bi-harmonically in a plane with a uniform static magnetic field directed perpendicular to the plane. The stochastic dynamics gives a steady state in the long-time limit. We have examined the orbital magnetic effect of introducing a parametrized deviation ($\eta$ -1) from the second fluctuation-dissipation (II-FD) relation that connects the driving noise and the frictional memory kernel in the standard Langevin dynamics. The main result obtained here is that the moving charged particle generates a finite orbital magnetic moment in the steady state, and that the moment shows a crossover from para-to dia-magnetic sign as the parameter $\eta$ is varied. It is zero for $\eta = 1$ that makes the steady state correspond to equilibrium, as it should. The magnitude of the orbital magnetic moment turns out to be a non-monotonic function of the applied magnetic field, tending to zero in the limit of an infinitely large as well as an infinitesimally small magnetic field. These results are discussed in the context of the classic Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem on the absence of classical orbital diamagnetism. Possible realization is also briefly discussed.
  • Amplification/attenuation of light waves in artificial materials with a gain/loss modulation on the wavelength scale can be sensitive to the propagation direction. We give a numerical proof of the high anisotropy of the gain/loss in two dimensional periodic structures with square and rhombic lattice symmetry by solving the full set of Maxwell's equations using the finite difference time domain method. Anisotropy of amplification/attenuation leads to the narrowing of the angular spectrum of propagating radiation with wavevectors close to the edges of the first Brillouin Zone. The effect provides a novel and useful method to filter out high spatial harmonics from noisy beams.
  • We have observed the blazar Markarian 421 with the TACTIC $\gamma$-ray telescope at Mt. Abu, India, from 22 November 2009 to 16 May 2010 for 265 hours. Detailed analysis of the data so recorded revealed presence of a TeV $\gamma$-ray signal with a statistical significance of 12.12$\sigma$ at $E_{\gamma}\geq$ 1 TeV. We have estimated the time averaged differential energy spectrum of the source in the energy range 1.0 - 16.44 TeV. The spectrum fits well with the power law function of the form ($dF/dE=f_0 E^{-\Gamma}$) with $f_0=(1.39\pm0.239)\times 10^{-11}cm^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1}$ and $\Gamma=2.31\pm0.14$.
  • It is demonstrated that the performance of the self-modulated proton driver plasma wakefield accelerator (SM-PDPWA) is strongly affected by the reduced phase velocity of the plasma wave. Using analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we show that the reduction is largest during the linear stage of self-modulation. As the instability nonlinearly saturates, the phase velocity approaches that of the driver. The deleterious effects of the wake's dynamics on the maximum energy gain of accelerated electrons can be avoided using side-injections of electrons, or by controlling the wake's phase velocity by smooth plasma density gradients.
  • We have examined theoretically the phenomenon of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) in a three-level system operating in the lambda-configuration in presence of an externally injected noise coupling the ground level to the intermediate (metastable) level. The changes in the depth and the width of the induced transparency and the slowing down of the probe light have been calculated as function of the probe detuning and the strength of the injected noise. The calculations are within the rotating-wave approximation (RWA). Our main results are the reduction and the broadening of the EIT with increasing strength of the injected noise, and a reduction in the slowing down of group velocity of the probe-laser beam. Thus, the injected semi-classical noise, unlike the quantum-dynamical noise associated with the spontaneous emission, is not effectively cancelled by the EIT mechanism.
  • We present a semi-phenomenological treatment of light transmission through and its reflection from a ferrofluid, which we regard as a magnetically tunable system of dense random dielectric scatterers with weak dissipation. Partial spatial ordering is introduced by the application of a transverse magnetic field that superimposes a periodic modulation on the dielectric randomess. This introduces Bragg scattering which effectively enhances the scattering due to disorder alone, and thus reduces the elastic mean free path towards Anderson localization. Our theoretical treatment, based on invariant imbedding, gives a simultaneous decrease of transmission and reflection without change of incident linear polarisation as the spatial order is tuned magnetically to the Bragg condition, namely the light wave vector being equal to half the Bragg vector (Q). Our experimental observations are in qualitative agreement with these results. We have also given expressions for the transit (sojourn) time of light and for the light energy stored in the random medium under steady illumination. The ferrofluid thus provides an interesting physical realization of effectively a "Lossy Anderson-Bragg" (LAB) cavity with which to study the effect of the interplay of spatial disorder, partial order and weak dissipation on light transport. Given the current interest in propagation, optical limiting and storage of light in ferrofluids, the present work seems topical.
  • We report magnetoresistance measurements over an extensive temperature range (0.1 K $\leq T \leq$ 100 K) in a disordered ferromagnetic semiconductor (\gma). The study focuses on a series of metallic \gma~ epilayers that lie in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition ($k_F l_e\sim 1$). At low temperatures ($T < 4$ K), we first confirm the results of earlier studies that the longitudinal conductivity shows a $T^{1/3}$ dependence, consistent with quantum corrections from carrier localization in a ``dirty'' metal. In addition, we find that the anomalous Hall conductivity exhibits universal behavior in this temperature range, with no pronounced quantum corrections. We argue that observed scaling relationship between the low temperature longitudinal and transverse resistivity, taken in conjunction with the absence of quantum corrections to the anomalous Hall conductivity, is consistent with the side-jump mechanism for the anomalous Hall effect. In contrast, at high temperatures ($T \gtrsim 4$ K), neither the longitudinal nor the anomalous Hall conductivity exhibit universal behavior, indicating the dominance of inelastic scattering contributions down to liquid helium temperatures.
  • Recently [EPL, 86, (2009) 17001], we had simulated the classical Langevin dynamics of a charged particle on the surface of a sphere in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field, and found a finite value for the orbital diamagnetic moment in the long-time limit. This result is surprising in that it seems to violate the classic Bohr-van Leeuwen Theorem on the absence of classical diamagnetism. It was indeed questioned by some workers [EPL, 89, (2010) 37001] who verified that the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation derived from our Langevin equation, was satisfied by the classical canonical density in the steady state, obtained by setting d/dt=0 in the FP equation. Inasmuch as the canonical density does not contain the magnetic field, they concluded that the diamagnetic moment must be zero. The purpose of this note is to show that this argument and the conclusion are invalid -- instead of setting d/dt=0 one must first obtain the fundamental time-dependent solution for the FP equation, and then calculate the expectation value of the diamagnetic moment, and finally consider its long-time limit (i.e., $t \to \infty$). This would indeed correspond to our numerical simulation of the dynamics. That this is indeed so is shown by considering the simpler analytically solvable problem, namely that for an unbounded plane for which the above procedure can be carried out exactly. We then find that the limiting value for the expectation of the diamagnetic moment is indeed non-zero, and yet the steady-state FP equation obtained by setting d/dt=0 is satisfied by the canonical density. Admittedly, the exact analytical solution for the sphere is not available. But, the exact solution obtained for the case of the unbounded 2D-plane illustrates our point all right. We also present some further new results for other finite but unbounded surfaces such the ellipsoids of revolution.
  • We have studied a EuFe2As2 single crystal by neutron diffraction under magnetic fields up to 3.5 T and temperatures down to 2 K. A field induced spin reorientation is observed in the presence of a magnetic field along both the a and c axes, respectively. Above critical field, the ground state antiferromagnetic configuration of Eu$^{2+}$ moments transforms into a ferromagnetic structure with moments along the applied field direction. The magnetic phase diagram for Eu magnetic sublattice in EuFe2As2 is presented. A considerable strain ($\sim$0.9%) is induced by the magnetic field, caused by the realignment of the twinning structure. Furthermore, the realignment of the twinning structure is found to be reversible with the rebound of magnetic field, which suggested the existence of magnetic shape-memory effect. The Eu moment ordering exhibits close relationship with the twinning structure. We argue that the Zeeman energy in combined with magnetic anisotropy energy is responsible for the observed spin-lattice coupling.
  • The pressure dependence of a large number of phonon modes in CaFe2As2 with energies covering the full range of the phonon spectrum has been studied using inelastic x-ray and neutron scattering. The observed phonon frequency changes are in general rather small despite the sizable changes of the lattice parameters at the phase transition. This indicates that the bonding properties are not profoundly altered by the phase transition. The transverse acoustic phonons propagating along the c-direction are an exception because they stiffen very significantly in response to the large contraction of the c-axis. The lattice parameters are found to change significantly as a function of pressure before, during and after the first-order phase transition. However, the frequencies change nearly uniformly with the change in the lattice parameters due to pressure, with no regard specifically to the first-order phase transition. Density functional theory describes the frequencies in both the zero pressure and in the collapsed phase in a satisfactory way if based on the respective crystal structures.
  • Among various parent compounds of iron pnictide superconductors, EuFe2As2 stands out due to the presence of both spin density wave of Fe and antiferromagnetic ordering (AFM) of the localized Eu2+ moment. Single crystal neutron diffraction studies have been carried out to determine the magnetic structure of this compound and to investigate the coupling of two magnetic sublattices. Long range AFM ordering of Fe and Eu spins was observed below 190 K and 19 K, respectively. The ordering of Fe2+ moments is associated with the wave vector k = (1,0,1) and it takes place at the same temperature as the tetragonal to orthorhombic structural phase transition, which indicates the strong coupling between structural and magnetic components. The ordering of Eu moment is associated with the wave vector k = (0,0,1). While both Fe and Eu spins are aligned along the long a axis as experimentally determined, our studies suggest a weak coupling between the Fe and Eu magnetism.
  • Extensive inelastic neutron scattering measurements of phonons on a single crystal of CaFe2As2 allowed us to establish a fairly complete picture of phonon dispersions in the main symmetry directions. The phonon spectra were also calculated by density functional theory (DFT) in the local density approximation (LDA). There are serious discrepancies between calculations done for the optimized structure and experiment, because the optimised structure is not the ambient pressure structure but is very close to the collapsed structure reached at p = 3.5 kbar. However, if the experimental crystal structure is used the calculation gives correct frequencies of most phonons. The most important new result is that linewidths/frequencies of certain modes are larger/softer than predicted by DFT-LDA. We also observed strong temperature dependence of some phonons near the structural phase transition near 173K. This behavior may indicate anomalously strong electron phonon coupling and/or anharmonicity, which may be important to the mechanism of superconductivity.
  • It is generally known that the orbital diamagnetism of a classical system of charged particles in thermal equilibrium is identically zero -- the Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem. Physically, this null result derives from the exact cancellation of the orbital diamagnetic moment associated with the complete cyclotron orbits of the charged particles by the paramagnetic moment subtended by the incomplete orbits skipping the boundary in the opposite sense. Motivated by this crucial, but subtle role of the boundary, we have simulated here the case of a finite but \emph{unbounded} system, namely that of a charged particle moving on the surface of a sphere in the presence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. Following a real space-time approach based on the classical Langevin equation, we have computed the orbital magnetic moment which now indeed turns out to be non-zero, and has the diamagnetic sign. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the possibility of finite classical diamagnetism in principle, and it is due to the avoided cancellation.
  • The mean free path of light ($l^*$) calculated for elastic scattering on a system of nanoparticles with spatially correlated disorder is found to have a minimum when the correlation length is of the order of the wavelength of light. For a typical choice of parameters for the scattering system, this minimum mean free path ($l^*_{min}$) turns out to satisfy the Ioffe-Regel criterion for wave localization, $l^*_{min} \sim \lambda$, over a range of the correlation length, defining thus a stop-band for light transmission. It also provides a semi-phenomenological explanation for several interesting findings reported recently on the transmission/ reflection and the trapping/storage of light in a magnetically tunable ferrofluidic system. The subtle effect of structural anisotropy, induced by the external magnetic field on the scattering by the medium, is briefly discussed in physical terms of the anisotropic Anderson localization.
  • Based on the classical Langevin equation, we have re-visited the problem of orbital motion of a charged particle in two dimensions for a normal magnetic field crossed with or without an in-plane electric bias. We are led to two interesting fluctuation effects: First, we obtain not only a longitudinal "work-fluctuation" relation as expected for a barotropic type system, but also a transverse work-fluctuation relation perpendicular to the electric bias. This "Hall fluctuation" involves the product of the electric and the magnetic fields. And second, for the case of harmonic confinement without bias, the calculated probability density for the orbital magnetic moment gives non-zero even moments, not derivable as field derivatives of the classical free energy.