• Microwave cavities for a Sikivie-type axion search are subject to several constraints. In the fabrication and operation of such cavities, often used at frequencies where the resonator is highly overmoded, it is important to be able to reliably identify several properties of the cavity. Those include identifying the symmetry of the mode of interest, confirming its form factor, and determining the frequency ranges where mode crossings with intruder levels cause unacceptable admixture, thus leading to the loss of purity of the mode of interest. A simple and powerful diagnostic for mapping out the electric field of a cavity is the bead perturbation technique. While a standard tool in accelerator physics, we have, for the first time, applied this technique to cavities used in the axion search. We report initial results from an extensive study for the initial cavity used in the HAYSTAC experiment. Two effects have been investigated: the role of rod misalignment in mode localization, and mode-mixing at avoided crossings of TM/TE modes. Future work will extend these results by incorporating precision metrology and high-fidelity simulations.
  • We describe a dark matter axion detector designed, constructed, and operated both as an innovation platform for new cavity and amplifier technologies and as a data pathfinder in the $5 - 25$ GHz range ($\sim20-100\: \mu$eV). The platform is small but flexible to facilitate the development of new microwave cavity and amplifier concepts in an operational environment. The experiment has recently completed its first data production; it is the first microwave cavity axion search to deploy a Josephson parametric amplifier and a dilution refrigerator to achieve near-quantum limited performance.
  • We report on the first results from a new microwave cavity search for dark matter axions with masses above $20~\mu\text{eV}$. We exclude axion models with two-photon coupling $g_{a\gamma\gamma} \gtrsim 2\times10^{-14}~\text{GeV}^{-1}$ over the range $23.55~\mu\text{eV} < m_a < 24.0~\mu\text{eV}$. These results represent two important achievements. First, we have reached cosmologically relevant sensitivity an order of magnitude higher in mass than any existing limits. Second, by incorporating a dilution refrigerator and Josephson parametric amplifier, we have demonstrated total noise approaching the standard quantum limit for the first time in an axion search.