• XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) produce short wavelength pulses with high intensity, ultrashort duration, well-defined polarization and transverse coherence, and have been utilised for many experiments previously possible at long wavelengths only: multiphoton ionization, pumping an atomic laser, and four-wave mixing spectroscopy. However one important optical technique, coherent control, has not yet been demonstrated, because Self- Amplified Spontaneous Emission FELs have limited longitudinal coherence. Single-colour pulses from the FERMI seeded FEL are longitudinally coherent, and two-colour emission is predicted to be coherent. Here we demonstrate the phase correlation of two colours, and manipulate it to control an experiment. Light of wavelengths 63.0 and 31.5 nm ionized neon, and the asymmetry of the photoelectron angular distribution was controlled by adjusting the phase, with temporal resolution 3 attoseconds. This opens the door to new shortwavelength coherent control experiments with ultrahigh time resolution and chemical sensitivity.
  • We present the experimental demonstration of a method for generating two spectrally and temporally separated pulses by an externally seeded, single-pass free-electron laser operating in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral range. Our results, collected on the FERMI@Elettra facility and confirmed by numerical simulations, demonstrate the possibility of controlling both the spectral and temporal features of the generated pulses. A free-electron laser operated in this mode becomes a suitable light source for jitter-free, two-colour pump-probe experiments.
  • The performance of manganite-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) has suffered from reduced magnetization present at the junction interfaces that is ultimately responsible for the spin polarization of injected currents; this behavior has been attributed to a magnetic "dead layer" that typically extends a few unit cells into the manganite. X-ray magnetic scattering in resonant conditions (XRMS) is one of the most innovative and effective techniques to extract surface or interfacial magnetization profiles with subnanometer resolution, and has only recently been applied to oxide heterostructures. Here we present our approach to characterizing the surface and interfacial magnetization of such heterostructures using the XRMS technique, conducted at the BEAR beamline (Elettra synchrotron, Trieste). Measurements were carried out in specular reflectivity geometry, switching the left/right elliptical polarization of light as well the magnetization direction in the scattering plane. Spectra were collected across the Mn L2,3 edge for at least four different grazing angles in order to better analyse the interference phenomena. The resulting reflectivity spectra have been carefully fit to obtain the magnetization profiles, minimizing the number of free parameters as much as possible. Optical constants of the samples (real and imaginary part of the refractive index) in the interested frequency range are obtained through absorption measurements in two magnetization states and subsequent Kramers-Kronig transformation, allowing quantitative fits of the magnetization profile at different temperatures. We apply this method to the study of air-exposed surfaces of epitaxial La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (001) films grown on SrTiO3 (001) substrates.
  • NO molecules adsorbed on a Pt(111) surface from dipping in an acidic nitrite solution are studied by near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) techniques. LEED patterns and STM images show that no long range ordered structures are formed after NO adsorption on a Pt(111) surface. Although the total NO coverage is very low, spectroscopic features in N K-edge and O K-edge absorption spectra have been singled out and related to the different species induced by this preparation method. From these measurements it is concluded that the NO molecule is adsorbed trough the N atom in an upright conformation. The maximum saturation coverage is about 0.3 monolayers, and although nitric oxide is the major component, nitrite and nitrogen species are slightly co-adsorbed on the surface. The results obtained from this study are compared with those previously reported in the literature for NO adsorbed on Pt(111) under UHV conditions.
  • Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) transmission spectra show a clear polarization effect in pi electronic transition in spin coated atactic polystyrene (aPS) films of thickness below 4Rg, where Rg (~20.4nm) is the radius of gyration of the polymer. This transition associated with pendant benzene rings in polystyrene. The polarization effect clearly indicates pendant benzene ring alignment on a macroscopic scale. Study of core electron (1s) transition through near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy confirms the ordering and shows that the rings are oriented towards out-of-plane direction with a tilt angle ~63 degree with the sample plane, which is consistent with the observed in-plane (sample surface) VUV polarization. These results indicate the transition of a common polymer, like polystyrene, inherently disordered in the bulk, to an orientationally ordered phase under a certain degree of confinement.