• We present initial results of a deep near-IR spectroscopic survey covering the 15 fields of the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS) using MOSFIRE on the Keck 1 telescope, focusing on a sample of 251 galaxies with redshifts 2.0< z < 2.6, star-formation rates 2 < SFR < 200 M_sun/yr, and stellar masses 8.6 < log(M*/M_sun) < 11.4, with high-quality spectra in both H- and K-band atmospheric windows. We show unambiguously that the locus of z~2.3 galaxies in the "BPT" nebular diagnostic diagram exhibits a disjoint, yet similarly tight, relationship between the ratios [NII]6585/Halpha and [OIII]/Hbeta as compared to local galaxies. Using photoionization models, we argue that the offset of the z~2.3 locus relative to z~ 0 is explained by a combination of harder ionizing radiation field, higher ionization parameter, and higher N/O at a given O/H than applies to most local galaxies, and that the position of a galaxy along the z~2.3 star-forming BPT locus is surprisingly insensitive to gas-phase oxygen abundance. The observed nebular emission line ratios are most easily reproduced by models in which the net ionizing radiation field resembles a blackbody with effective temperature T_eff = 50000-60000 K and N/O close to the solar value at all O/H. We critically assess the applicability of commonly-used strong line indices for estimating gas-phase metallicities, and consider the implications of the small intrinsic scatter in the empirical relationship between excitation-sensitive line indices and stellar mass (i.e., the "mass-metallicity" relation), at z~2.3.
  • We present Keck-I MOSFIRE near-infrared spectroscopy for a sample of 13 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at redshift $2\leq z \leq2.5$ with star formation rates of SFR$\sim$100M$_{\odot}$ y$^{-1}$ and masses of log(M/M$_{\odot}$)$\sim10.8$. Their high integrated gas velocity dispersions of $\sigma_{\rm{int}}$=230$^{+40}_{-30}$ km s$^{-1}$, as measured from emission lines of H$_{\alpha}$ and [OIII], and the resultant M$_{\star}-\sigma_{\rm{int}}$ relation and M$_{\star}$$-$M$_{\rm{dyn}}$ all match well to those of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\sim2$, as measured from stellar absorption lines. Since log(M$_{\star}$/M$_{\rm{dyn}}$)$=-0.06\pm0.2$ dex, these compact SFGs appear to be dynamically relaxed and more evolved, i.e., more depleted in gas and dark matter ($<$13$^{+17}_{-13}$\%) than their non-compact SFG counterparts at the same epoch. Without infusion of external gas, depletion timescales are short, less than $\sim$300 Myr. This discovery adds another link to our new dynamical chain of evidence that compact SFGs at $z\gtrsim2$ are already losing gas to become the immediate progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies by $z\sim2$.
  • This paper analyzes a sample of 489 Spitzer/IRAC sources in the Extended Groth Strip whose spectral energy distributions fit a red power law from 3.6 to 8.0 \micron. The median for sources with known redshift is <z>=1.6. Though all or nearly all of the sample are likely to be active galactic nuclei, only 33% were detected in the EGS X-ray survey (AEGIS-X) using 200 ks Chandra observations. The detected sources are X-ray luminous with L_X > 10^43 erg/s and moderately to heavily obscured with N_H > 10^22 cm^-2. Stacking the X-ray-undetected sample members yields a statistically significant X-ray signal, suggesting that they are on average more distant or more obscured than sources with X-ray detections. The ratio of X-ray to mid-infrared fluxes suggests that a substantial fraction of the sources undetected in X-rays are obscured at the Compton-thick level, in contrast to the X-ray-detected sources, all of which appear to be Compton-thin. For the X-ray-detected power-law sources with redshifts, an X-ray luminosity L_X ~ 10^44 erg/s marks a transition between low-luminosity, blue sources dominated by the host galaxy to high-luminosity, red power-law sources dominated by nuclear activity. X-ray-to-optical ratios, infrared variability, and 24 micron properties of the sample are consistent with the identification of infrared power-law sources as active nuclei, but a rough estimate is that only 22% of AGNs are selected by the power law criteria. Comparison of the power-law selection technique and various IRAC color criteria for identifying AGNs confirms that high-redshift samples selected via simple IRAC colors may be heavily contaminated by starlight-dominated objects.
  • As part of the "All Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey" (AEGIS), we describe the panchromatic characterization of an X-ray luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a merging galaxy at z=1.15. This object is detected at infrared (8mic, 24mic, 70mic, 160mic), submillimeter (850mic) and radio wavelengths, from which we derive a bolometric luminosity L_bol ~ 9x10^12 Lsol. We find that the AGN clearly dominates the hot dust emission below 40mic but its total energetic power inferred from the hard X-rays is substantially less than the bolometric output of the system. About 50% of the infrared luminosity is indeed produced by a cold dust component that probably originates from enshrouded star formation in the host galaxy. In the context of a coeval growth of stellar bulges and massive black holes, this source might represent a ``transition'' object sharing properties with both quasars and luminous starbursts. Study of such composite galaxies will help address how the star formation and disk-accretion phenomena may have regulated each other at high redshift and how this coordination may have participated to the build-up of the relationship observed locally between the masses of black holes and stellar spheroids.
  • The evolution of the B-band galaxy luminosity function is measured using a sample of more than 11,000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey. The rest-frame M_B versus U-B color-magnitude diagram of DEEP2 galaxies shows that the color-magnitude bi-modality seen in galaxies locally is still present at redshifts z > 1. Dividing the sample at the trough of this color bimodality into predominantly red and blue galaxies, we find that the luminosity function of each galaxy color type evolves differently. Blue counts tend to shift to brighter magnitudes at constant number density, while the red counts remain largely constant at a fixed absolute magnitude. Using Schechter functions with fixed faint-end slopes we find that M*_B for blue galaxies brightens by ~ 1.3 magnitudes per unit redshift, with no significant evolution in number density. For red galaxies M*_B brightens somewhat less with redshift, while the formal value of phi* declines. When the population of blue galaxies is subdivided into two halves using the rest-frame color as the criterion, the measured evolution of both blue subpopulations is very similar.
  • The DEEP2 and COMBO-17 surveys are used to study the evolution of the luminosity function of red and blue galaxies to $z \sim 1$. Schechter function fits show that, since $z = 1$, $M^*_B$ dims by $\sim$ 1.3 mag per unit redshift for both color classes, $\phi^*$ of blue galaxies shows little change, while $\phi^*$ for red galaxies has formally nearly quadrupled. At face value, the number density of blue galaxies has remained roughly constant since $ z = 1$, whereas that of red galaxies has been rising. Luminosity densities support both conclusions, but we note that most red-galaxy evolution occurs between our data and local surveys and in our highest redshift bin, where the data are weakest. We discuss the implications of having most red galaxies emerge after $z = 1$ from precursors among the blue population, taking into account the properties of local and distant E/S0s. We suggest a ``mixed'' scenario in which some blue galaxies have their star-formation quenched in gas-rich mergers, migrate to the red sequence with a variety of masses, and merge further on the red sequence in one or more purely stellar mergers. E/S0s of a given mass today will have formed via different routes, in a manner that may help to explain the fundamental plane and other local scaling laws.