• Fractional quantum Hall-superconductor heterostructures may provide a platform towards non-abelian topological modes beyond Majoranas. However their quantitative theoretical study remains extremely challenging. We propose and implement a numerical setup for studying edge states of fractional quantum Hall droplets with a superconducting instability. The fully gapped edges carry a topological degree of freedom that can encode quantum information protected against local perturbations. We simulate such a system numerically using exact diagonalization by restricting the calculation to the quasihole-subspace of a (time-reversal symmetric) bilayer fractional quantum Hall system of Laughlin $\nu=1/3$ states. We show that the edge ground states are permuted by spin-dependent flux insertion and demonstrate their fractional $6\pi$ Josephson effect, evidencing their topological nature and the Cooper pairing of fractionalized quasiparticles.
  • At small momenta, the Girvin-MacDonald-Platzman (GMP) mode in the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect can be identified with gapped nematic fluctuations in the isotropic FQH liquid. This correspondence would be exact as the GMP mode softens upon approach to the putative point of a quantum phase transition to a FQH nematic. Motivated by these considerations as well as by suggestive evidence of an FQH nematic in tilted field experiments, we have sought evidence of such a nematic FQHE in a microscopic model of interacting electrons in the lowest Landau level at filling factor 1/3. Using a family of anisotropic Laughlin states as trial wave functions, we find a continuous quantum phase transition between the isotropic Laughlin liquid and the FQH nematic. Results of numerical exact diagonalization also suggest that rotational symmetry is spontaneously broken, and that the phase diagram of the model contains both a nematic and a stripe phase.
  • We investigate numerically different phases that can occur at half filling in the lowest and the first excited Landau levels in wide-well twodimensional electron systems exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field. Within a twocomponent model that takes into account only the two lowest electronic subbands of the quantum well, we derive a phase diagram that compares favorably with an experimental one by Shabani et al. [Phys. Rev. B 88, 245413 (2013)]. In addition to the compressible composite-fermion Fermi liquid in narrow wells with a substantial subband gap and the incompressible twocomponent (331) Halperin state, we identify in the lowest Landau level a rectangular Wigner crystal occupying the second subband. This crystal may be the origin of the experimentally observed insulating phase in the limit of wide wells and high electronic densities. In the second Landau level, the incompressible Pfaffian state, which occurs in narrow wells and large subband gaps, is also separated by an intermediate region from a large-well limit in which a similar rectangular Wigner crystal in the excited subband is the ground state, as for the lowest Landau level. However, the intermediate region is characterized by an incompressible state that consists of two four-flux Pfaffians in each of the components.
  • We investigate the role of symmetries in determining the random matrix class describing quantum thermalization in a periodically driven many body quantum system. Using a combination of analytical arguments and numerical exact diagonalization, we establish that a periodically driven `Floquet' system can be in a different random matrix class to the instantaneous Hamiltonian. A periodically driven system can thermalize even when the instantaneous Hamiltonian is integrable. A Floquet system that thermalizes in general can display integrable behavior at commensurate driving frequencies. When the instantaneous Hamiltonian and Floquet operator both thermalize, the Floquet problem can be in the unitary class while the instantaneous Hamiltonian is always in the orthogonal class, and vice versa. We extract general principles regarding when a Floquet problem can thermalize to a different symmetry class to the instantaneous Hamiltonian. A (finite-sized) Floquet system can even display crossovers between different random matrix classes as a function of driving frequency.
  • The entanglement spectroscopy, initially introduced by Li and Haldane in the context of the fractional quantum Hall effects, has stimulated an extensive range of studies. The entanglement spectrum is the spectrum of the reduced density matrix, when we partition the system into two. For many quantum systems, it unveils a unique feature: Computed from the bulk ground state wave function, the entanglement spectrum give access to the physics of edge excitations. Using this property, the entanglement spectroscopy has proved to be a highly valuable tool to diagnose topological ordering. These lectures intend to provide an overview of the entanglement spectroscopy, mainly in the context of the fractional quantum Hall effect. We introduce the basic concepts through the case of the quantum spin chains. We discuss the connection with the entanglement entropy and the matrix product state representation. We show how the entanglement spectrum can be computed for non-interacting topological phases and how it reveals the edge excitation from the ground state. We then present an extensive review of the entanglement spectra applied to the fractional quantum Hall phases, showing how much information is encoded within the ground state and how different partitions probe different type of excitations. Finally, we discuss the application of this tool to study the fractional Chern insulators.
  • We provide a detailed explanation of the formalism necessary to construct matrix product states for non-Abelian quasiholes in fractional quantum Hall model states. Our construction yields an efficient representation of the wave functions with conformal-block normalization and monodromy, and complements the matrix product state representation of fractional quantum Hall ground states.
  • We describe the design, operation, and first results of a photometric calibration project, called DICE (Direct Illumination Calibration Experiment), aiming at achieving precise instrumental calibration of optical telescopes. The heart of DICE is an illumination device composed of 24 narrow-spectrum, high-intensity, light-emitting diodes (LED) chosen to cover the ultraviolet-to-near-infrared spectral range. It implements a point-like source placed at a finite distance from the telescope entrance pupil, yielding a flat field illumination that covers the entire field of view of the imager. The purpose of this system is to perform a lightweight routine monitoring of the imager passbands with a precision better than 5 per-mil on the relative passband normalisations and about 3{\AA} on the filter cutoff positions. The light source is calibrated on a spectrophotometric bench. As our fundamental metrology standard, we use a photodiode calibrated at NIST. The radiant intensity of each beam is mapped, and spectra are measured for each LED. All measurements are conducted at temperatures ranging from 0{\deg}C to 25{\deg}C in order to study the temperature dependence of the system. The photometric and spectroscopic measurements are combined into a model that predicts the spectral intensity of the source as a function of temperature. We find that the calibration beams are stable at the $10^{-4}$ level -- after taking the slight temperature dependence of the LED emission properties into account. We show that the spectral intensity of the source can be characterised with a precision of 3{\AA} in wavelength. In flux, we reach an accuracy of about 0.2-0.5% depending on how we understand the off-diagonal terms of the error budget affecting the calibration of the NIST photodiode. With a routine 60-mn calibration program, the apparatus is able to constrain the passbands at the targeted precision levels.
  • In two dimensions strongly interacting bosons in a magnetic field can realize a bosonic integer quantum Hall state, the simplest two dimensional example of a symmetry protected topological phase. We propose a realistic implementation of this phase using an optical flux lattice. Through exact diagonalization calculations, we show that the system exhibits a clear bulk gap and the topological signature of the bosonic integer quantum Hall state. In particular, the calculation of the many-body Chern number leads to a quantized Hall conductance in agreement with the analytical predictions. We also study the stability of the phase with respect to some of the experimentally relevant parameters.
  • Parafermions are the simplest generalizations of Majorana fermions that realize topological order. We propose a less restrictive notion of topological order in 1D open chains, which generalizes the seminal work by Fendley [J. Stat. Mech., P11020 (2012)]. The first essential property is that the groundstates are mutually indistinguishable by local, symmetric probes, and the second is a generalized notion of zero edge modes which cyclically permute the groundstates. These two properties are shown to be topologically robust, and applicable to a wider family of topologically-ordered Hamiltonians than has been previously considered. An an application of these edge modes, we formulate a new notion of twisted boundary conditions on a closed chain, which guarantees that the closed-chain groundstate is topological, i.e., it originates from the topological manifold of degenerate states on the open chain. Finally, we generalize these ideas to describe symmetry-breaking phases with a parafermionic order parameter. These exotic phases are condensates of parafermion multiplets, which generalizes Cooper pairing in superconductors. The stability of these condensates are investigated on both open and closed chains.
  • Using the newly developed Matrix Product State (MPS) formalism for non-abelian Fractional Quantum Hall (FQH) states, we address the question of whether a FQH trial wave function written as a correlation function in a non-unitary Conformal Field Theory (CFT) can describe the bulk of a gapped FQH phase. We show that the non-unitary Gaffnian state exhibits clear signatures of a pathological behavior. As a benchmark we compute the correlation length of Moore-Read state and find it to be finite in the thermodynamic limit. By contrast, the Gaffnian state has infinite correlation length in (at least) the non-Abelian sector, and is therefore gapless. We also compute the topological entanglement entropy of several non-abelian states with and without quasiholes. For the first time in FQH the results are in excellent agreement in all topological sectors with the CFT prediction for unitary states. For the non-unitary Gaffnian state in finite size systems, the topological entanglement entropy seems to behave like that of the Composite Fermion Jain state at equal filling.
  • Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are widely used in astronomy to carry out a variety of measurements, such as for flux or shape of astrophysical objects. The data reduction procedures almost always assume that ther esponse of a given pixel to illumination is independent of the content of the neighboring pixels. We show evidence that this simple picture is not exact for several CCD sensors. Namely, we provide evidence that localized distributions of charges (resulting from star illumination or laboratory luminous spots) tend to broaden linearly with increasing brightness by up to a few percent over the whole dynamic range. We propose a physical explanation for this "brighter-fatter" effect, which implies that flatfields do not exactly follow Poisson statistics: the variance of flatfields grows less rapidly than their average, and neighboring pixels show covariances, which increase similarly to the square of the flatfield average. These covariances decay rapidly with pixel separation. We observe the expected departure from Poisson statistics of flatfields on CCD devices and show that the observed effects are compatible with Coulomb forces induced by stored charges that deflect forthcoming charges. We extract the strength of the deflections from the correlations of flatfield images and derive the evolution of star shapes with increasing flux. We show for three types of sensors that within statistical uncertainties,our proposed method properly bridges statistical properties of flatfields and the brighter-fatter effect.
  • We forecast dark energy constraints that could be obtained from a new large sample of Type Ia supernovae where those at high redshift are acquired with the Euclid space mission. We simulate a three-prong SN survey: a z<0.35 nearby sample (8000 SNe), a 0.2<z<0.95 intermediate sample (8800 SNe), and a 0.75<z<1.55 high-z sample (1700 SNe). The nearby and intermediate surveys are assumed to be conducted from the ground, while the high-z is a joint ground- and space-based survey. This latter survey, the "Dark Energy Supernova Infra-Red Experiment" (DESIRE), is designed to fit within 6 months of Euclid observing time, with a dedicated observing program. We simulate the SN events as they would be observed in rolling-search mode by the various instruments, and derive the quality of expected cosmological constraints. We account for known systematic uncertainties, in particular calibration uncertainties including their contribution through the training of the supernova model used to fit the supernovae light curves. Using conservative assumptions and a 1-D geometric Planck prior, we find that the ensemble of surveys would yield competitive constraints: a constant equation of state parameter can be constrained to sigma(w)=0.022, and a Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit of 203 is found for a two-parameter equation of state. Our simulations thus indicate that Euclid can bring a significant contribution to a purely geometrical cosmology constraint by extending a high-quality SN Hubble diagram to z~1.5. We also present other science topics enabled by the DESIRE Euclid observations
  • We use simulated SN Ia samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and the bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: 120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, 255 SDSS SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and 290 SNLS SNe Ia (z <= 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (winput - wrecovered) ranging from -0.005 +/- 0.012 to -0.024 +/- 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within uncertainty; the average bias on w is -0.014 +/- 0.007.
  • An interesting route to the realization of topological Chern bands in ultracold atomic gases is through the use of optical flux lattices. These models differ from the tight-binding real-space lattice models of Chern insulators that are conventionally studied in solid-state contexts. Instead, they involve the coherent coupling of internal atomic (spin) states, and can be viewed as tight-binding models in reciprocal space. By changing the form of the coupling and the number $N$ of internal spin states, they give rise to Chern bands with controllable Chern number and with nearly flat energy dispersion. We investigate in detail how interactions between bosons occupying these bands can lead to the emergence of fractional quantum Hall states, such as the Laughlin and Moore-Read states. In order to test the experimental realization of these phases, we study their stability with respect to band dispersion and band mixing. We also probe novel topological phases that emerge in these systems when the Chern number is greater than 1.
  • Quasiholes in certain fractional quantum Hall states are promising candidates for the experimental realization of non-Abelian anyons. They are assumed to be localized excitations, and to display non-Abelian statistics when sufficiently separated, but these properties have not been explicitly demonstrated except for the Moore-Read state. In this work, we apply the newly developed matrix product state technique to examine these exotic excitations. For the Moore-Read and the $\mathbb{Z}_3$ Read-Rezayi states, we estimate the quasihole radii, and determine the correlation lengths associated with the exponential convergence of the braiding statistics. We provide the first microscopic verification for the Fibonacci nature of the $\mathbb{Z}_3$ Read-Rezayi quasiholes. We also present evidence for the failure of plasma screening in the non-unitary Gaffnian wave function.
  • We present cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations obtained by the SDSS-II and SNLS collaborations. The data set includes several low-redshift samples (z<0.1), all 3 seasons from the SDSS-II (0.05 < z < 0.4), and 3 years from SNLS (0.2 <z < 1) and totals \ntotc spectroscopically confirmed type Ia supernovae with high quality light curves. We have followed the methods and assumptions of the SNLS 3-year data analysis except for the following important improvements: 1) the addition of the full SDSS-II spectroscopically-confirmed SN Ia sample in both the training of the SALT2 light curve model and in the Hubble diagram analysis (\nsdssc SNe), 2) inter-calibration of the SNLS and SDSS surveys and reduced systematic uncertainties in the photometric calibration, performed blindly with respect to the cosmology analysis, and 3) a thorough investigation of systematic errors associated with the SALT2 modeling of SN Ia light-curves. We produce recalibrated SN Ia light-curves and associated distances for the SDSS-II and SNLS samples. The large SDSS-II sample provides an effective, independent, low-z anchor for the Hubble diagram and reduces the systematic error from calibration systematics in the low-z SN sample. For a flat LCDM cosmology we find Omega_m=0.295+-0.034 (stat+sys), a value consistent with the most recent CMB measurement from the Planck and WMAP experiments. Our result is 1.8sigma (stat+sys) different than the previously published result of SNLS 3-year data. The change is due primarily to improvements in the SNLS photometric calibration. When combined with CMB constraints, we measure a constant dark-energy equation of state parameter w=-1.018+-0.057 (stat+sys) for a flat universe. Adding BAO distance measurements gives similar constraints: w=-1.027+-0.055.
  • We investigate theoretically the fractional quantum Hall effect at half-filling in the lowest Landau level observed in asymmetric wide quantum wells. The asymmetry can be achieved by a potential bias applied between the two sides of the well. Within exact-diagonalization calculations in the spherical geometry, we find that the incompressible state is described in terms of a two-component wave function. Its overlap with the ground state can be optimized with the help of a rotation in the space of the pseudospin, which mimics the lowest two electronic subbands.
  • We analyze the collective magneto-roton excitations of bosonic Laughlin $\nu=1/2$ fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states on the torus and of their analog on the lattice, the fractional Chern insulators (FCIs). We show that, by applying the appropriate mapping of momentum quantum numbers between the two systems, the magneto-roton mode can be identified in FCIs and that it contains the same number of states as in the FQH case. Further, we numerically test the single mode approximation to the magneto-roton mode for both the FQH and FCI case. This proves particularly challenging for the FCI, because its eigenstates have a lower translational symmetry than the FQH states. In spite of this, we construct the FCI single-mode approximation such that it carries the same momenta as the FQH states, allowing for a direct comparison between the two systems. We show that the single-mode approximation captures well a dispersive subset of the magneto-roton excitations both for the FQH and the FCI case. We find remarkable quantitative agreement between the two systems. For example, the many-body excitation gap extrapolates to almost the same value in the thermodynamic limit.
  • We propose a simple microscopic model to numerically investigate the stability of a two dimensional fractional topological insulator (FTI). The simplest example of a FTI consists of two decoupled copies of a Laughlin state with opposite chiralities. We focus on bosons at half filling. We study the stability of the FTI phase upon addition of two coupling terms of different nature: an interspin interaction term, and an inversion symmetry breaking term that couples the copies at the single particle level. Using exact diagonalization and entanglement spectra, we numerically show that the FTI phase is stable against both perturbations. We compare our system to a similar bilayer fractional Chern insulator. We show evidence that the time reversal invariant system survives the introduction of interaction coupling on a larger scale than the time reversal symmetry breaking one, stressing the importance of time reversal symmetry in the FTI phase stability. We also discuss possible fractional phases beyond $\nu = 1/2$.
  • We present evidence that spots imaged using astronomical CCDs do not exactly scale with flux: bright spots tend to be broader than faint ones, using the same illumination pattern. We measure that the linear size of spots or stars, of typical size 3 to 4 pixels FWHM, increase linearly with their flux by up to $2\%$ over the full CCD dynamic range. This brighter-fatter effect affects both deep-depleted and thinned CCD sensors. We propose that this effect is a direct consequence of the distortions of the drift electric field sourced by charges accumulated within the CCD during the exposure and experienced by forthcoming light-induced charges in the same exposure. The pixel boundaries then become slightly dynamical: overfilled pixels become increasingly smaller than their neighbors, so that bright star sizes, measured in number of pixels, appear larger than those of faint stars. This interpretation of the brighter-fatter effect implies that pixels in flat-fields should exhibit statistical correlations, sourced by Poisson fluctuations, that we indeed directly detect. We propose to use the measured correlations in flat-fields to derive how pixel boundaries shift under the influence of a given charge pattern, which allows us to quantitatively predict how star shapes evolve with flux. This physical model of the brighter-fatter effect also explains the commonly observed phenomenon that the spatial variance of CCD flat-fields increases less rapidly than their average.
  • Using truncated conformal field theory (CFT), we present the formalism necessary to obtain exact matrix product state (MPS) representations for any fractional quantum hall model state which can be written as an expectation value of primary fields in some conformal field theory. The auxiliary bond space is the Hilbert space of the descendants of primary fields and matrix elements can be calculated using well-known CFT commutation relations. We obtain a site-independent MPS representation on the thin annulus and cylinder, while a site-dependent representation is possible on the disk and sphere geometries. We discuss the complications that arise due to the presence of null vectors in the theory's Hilbert space, and present an array of procedures which optimize the numerical calculation of matrix elements. By truncating the Hilbert space of the CFT, we then build an approximate MPS representation for Laughlin, Moore-Read, Read-Rezayi, Gaffnian, minimal $M(3,r+2)$ models, and a series of superconformal minimal models. We show how to obtain, in the MPS representation, the Orbital, Particle, and Real Space entanglement spectrum in both the finite and infinite systems.
  • We study the static structure factor of the fractional Chern insulator Laughlin-like state and provide analytical forms for this quantity in the long-distance limit. In the course of this we identify averaged over Brillouin zone Fubini Study metric as the relevant metric in the long-distance limit. We discuss under which conditions the static structure factor will assume the usual behavior of Laughlin-like fractional quantum Hall system i.e. the scenario of Girvin, MacDonald, and Platzman [Phys. Rev. B 33, 2481 (1986)]. We study the influence of the departure of the averaged over Brillouin zone Fubini Study metric from its fractional quantum Hall value which appears in the long-distance analysis as an effective change of the filling factor. According to our exact diagonalization results on the Haldane model and analytical considerations we find persistence of fractional Chern insulator state even in this region of the parameter space.
  • In this paper we provide analytical counting rules for the ground states and the quasiholes of fractional Chern insulators with an arbitrary Chern number. We first construct pseudopotential Hamiltonians for fractional Chern insulators. We achieve this by mapping the lattice problem to the lowest Landau level of a multicomponent continuum quantum Hall system with specially engineered boundary conditions. We then analyze the thin-torus limit of the pseudopotential Hamiltonians, and extract counting rules (generalized Pauli principles, or Haldane statistics) for the degeneracy of its zero modes in each Bloch momentum sector.
  • We present spectra and lightcurves of SNLS 06D4eu and SNLS 07D2bv, two hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. At z = 1.588, SNLS 06D4eu is the highest redshift superluminous SN with a spectrum, at M_U = -22.7 is one of the most luminous SNe ever observed, and gives a rare glimpse into the restframe ultraviolet where these supernovae put out their peak energy. SNLS 07D2bv does not have a host galaxy redshift, but based on the supernova spectrum, we estimate it to be at z ~ 1.5. Both supernovae have similar observer-frame griz lightcurves, which map to restframe lightcurves in the U-band and UV, rising in ~ 20 restframe days or longer, and declining over a similar timescale. The lightcurves peak in the shortest wavelengths first, consistent with an expanding blackbody starting near 15,000 K and steadily declining in temperature. We compare the spectra to theoretical models, and identify lines of C II, C III, Fe III, and Mg II in the spectrum of SNLS 06D4eu and SCP 06F6, and find that they are consistent with an expanding explosion of only a few solar masses of carbon, oxygen, and other trace metals. Thus the progenitors appear to be related to those suspected for SNe Ic. A high kinetic energy, 10^52 ergs, is also favored. Normal mechanisms of powering core- collapse or thermonuclear supernovae do not seem to work for these supernovae. We consider models powered by 56Ni decay and interaction with circumstellar material, but find that the creation and spin-down of a magnetar with a period of 2ms, magnetic field of 2 x 10^14 Gauss, and a 3 solar mass progenitor provides the best fit to the data.
  • We study the fractional quantum Hall effect in a bilayer with charge-distribution imbalance induced, for instance, by a bias gate voltage. The bilayer can either be intrinsic or it can be formed spontaneously in wide quantum wells, due to the Coulomb repulsion between electrons. We focus on fractional quantum Hall effect in asymmetric bilayer systems at filling factor nu=4/11 and show that an asymmetric Halperin-like trial wavefunction gives a valid description of the ground state of the system.