• In the light of the new observational data related to fluorine abundances in the solar neighborhood stars, we present here chemical evolution models testing different fluorine nucleosynthesis prescriptions with the aim to best fit those new data related to the abundance ratios [F/O] vs. [O/H] and [F/Fe] vs. [Fe/H]. The adopted chemical evolution models are: i) the classical "two-infall" model which follows the chemical evolution of halo-thick disk and thin disk phases, ii) and the "one-infall" model designed only for the thin disk evolution. We tested the effects on the predicted fluorine abundance ratios of different nucleosynthesis yield sources: AGB stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, Type II and Type Ia supernovae, and novae. We find that the fluorine production is dominated by AGB stars but the Wolf-Rayet stars are required to reproduce the trend of the observed data in the solar neighborhood by J\"onsson et al. (2017a) with our chemical evolution models. In particular, the best model both for the "two-infall" and "one-infall" cases requires an increase by a factor of two of the Wolf-Rayet yields given by Meynet & Arnould (2000). We also show that the novae, even if their yields are still uncertain, could help to better reproduce the secondary behavior of F in the [F/O] vs. [O/H] relation. The inclusion of the fluorine production by Wolf-Rayet stars seems to be essential to reproduce the observed ratio [F/O] vs [O/H] in the solar neighborhood by J\"onsson et al. (2017a). Moreover, the inclusion of novae helps substantially to reproduce the observed fluorine secondary behavior.
  • We present a spectroscopic follow-up of photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the Central Molecular Zone of the Galactic center. Our goal is to quantify the contamination of this YSO sample by reddened giant stars with circumstellar envelopes and to determine the star formation rate in the CMZ. We obtained KMOS low-resolution near-infrared spectra (R ~4000) between 2.0 and 2.5 um of sources, many of them previously identified, by mid-infrared photometric criteria, as massive YSOs in the Galactic center. Our final sample consists of 91 stars with good signal-to-noise ratio. We separate YSOs from cool late-type stars based on spectral features of CO and Br_gamma at 2.3 um and 2.16 um respectively. We make use of SED model fits to the observed photometric data points from 1.25 to 24 um in order to estimate approximate masses for the YSOs. Using the spectroscopically identified YSOs in our sample, we confirm that existing colour-colour diagrams and colour-magnitude diagrams are unable to efficiently separate YSOs and cool late-type stars. In addition, we define a new colour-colour criterion that separates YSOs from cool late-type stars in the H-Ks vs H-[8.0] diagram. We use this new criterion to identify YSO candidates in the |l| < 1.5, |b|<0.5 degree region and use model SED fits to estimate their approximate masses. By assuming an appropriate initial mass function (IMF) and extrapolating the stellar IMF down to lower masses, we determine a star formation rate (SFR) of ~0.046 +/- 0.026 Msun/yr assuming an average age of 0.75 +/- 0.25 Myr for the YSOs. This value is lower than estimates found using the YSO counting method in the literature. Our SFR estimate in the CMZ agrees with the previous estimates from different methods and reaffirms that star formation in the CMZ is proceeding at a lower rate than predicted by various star forming models.
  • Owing to their extreme crowding and high and variable extinction, stars in the Galactic Bulge, within +-2 degrees of the Galactic plane, and especially those in the Nuclear Star Cluster, have only rarely been targeted for an analyses of their detailed abundances. There is also some disagreement about the high end of the abundance scale for these stars. It is now possible to obtain high dispersion, high S/N spectra in the infrared K band (2.0-2.4 microns) for these giants; we report our progress at Keck and VLT in using these spectra to infer the composition of this stellar population.
  • Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are known to produce `cosmic' fluorine but it is uncertain whether these stars are the main producers of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood or if any of the other proposed formation sites, type II supernovae and/or Wolf-Rayet stars, are more important. Recent articles have proposed both Asymptotic Giant Branch stars as well as type II supernovae as the dominant sources of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood. In this paper we set out to determine the fluorine abundance in a sample of 49 nearby, bright K-giants for which we previously have determined the stellar parameters as well as alpha abundances homogeneously from optical high-resolution spectra. The fluorine abundance is determined from a 2.3 $\mu$m HF molecular line observed with the spectrometer Phoenix. We compare the fluorine abundances with those of alpha elements mainly produced in type II supernovae and find that fluorine and the alpha-elements do not evolve in lock-step, ruling out type II supernovae as the dominating producers of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we find a secondary behavior of fluorine with respect to oxygen, which is another evidence against the type II supernovae playing a large role in the production of fluorine in the Solar neighborhood. This secondary behavior of fluorine will put new constraints on stellar models of the other two suggested production sites: Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Wolf-Rayet stars.
  • Determining elemental abundances of bulge stars can, via chemical evolution modeling, help to understand the formation and evolution of the bulge. Recently there have been claims both for and against the bulge having a different [$\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H]-trend as compared to the local thick disk possibly meaning a faster, or at least different, formation time scale of the bulge as compared to the local thick disk. We aim to determine the abundances of oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium in a sample of 46 bulge K-giants, 35 of which have been analyzed for oxygen and magnesium in previous works, and compare them to homogeneously determined elemental abundances of a local disk sample of 291 K-giants. We use spectral synthesis to determine both the stellar parameters as well as the elemental abundances of the bulge stars analyzed here. The method is exactly the same as was used for analyzing the comparison sample of 291 local K-giants in Paper I of this series. Compared to the previous analysis of the 35 stars in our sample, we find lower [Mg/Fe] for [Fe/H]>-0.5, and therefore contradict the conclusion about a declining [O/Mg] for increasing [Fe/H]. We instead see a constant [O/Mg] over all the observed [Fe/H] in the bulge. Furthermore, we find no evidence for a different behavior of the alpha-iron trends in the bulge as compared to the local thick disk from our two samples.
  • The galactic bulge is a significant part of our galaxy, but it is hard to observe, being both distant and covered by dust in the disk. Therefore there do not exist many hi-res optical spectra of bulge stars with large wavelength coverage, whose determined abundances can be compared with nearby, similarly analyzed stellar samples. We aim to determine the, for chemical evolution models, so important alpha elements of a sample of bulge giants using hi-res optical spectra with large wavelength coverage. The abundances found will be compared to similarly derived abundances from similar spectra of similar stars in the local thin and thick disks. In this first paper we focus on the Solar neighborhood reference sample. We use spectral synthesis to derive the stellar parameters as well as the elemental abundances of both the local as well as the bulge samples of giants. Special care is taken to benchmark our method of determining stellar parameters against independent measurements of effective temperatures from angular diameter measurements and surface gravities from asteroseismology. In this first paper we present the method used to determine the stellar parameters as well as the elemental abundances, evaluate them, and present the results for our local disk sample of 291 giants. When comparing our determined spectroscopic temperatures to those derived from angular diameter measurements, we reproduce these with a systematic difference of +10 K and a standard deviation of 53 K. The spectroscopic gravities are reproducing the ones determined from asteroseismology with a systematic offset of +0.10 dex and a standard deviation of 0.12 dex. When it comes to the abundance trends, our sample of local disk giants is closely following that of other works analyzing solar neighborhood dwarfs, showing that the much brighter giant stars are as good abundance probes as the often used dwarfs.
  • We report the first results from our program to examine the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster connected to SgrA*, with the goal of inferring the star formation and enrichment history of this system, as well as its connection and relationship with the central 100 pc of the bulge/bar system. We present the first high resolution (R~24,000), detailed abundance analysis of a K=10.2 metal-poor, alpha-enhanced red giant projected at 1.5 pc from the Galactic Center, using NIRSPEC on Keck II. A careful analysis of the dynamics and color of the star locates it at about 26 pc line-of-sight distance in front of the nuclear cluster. It probably belongs to one of the nuclear components (cluster or disk), not to the bar-bulge or classical disk. A detailed spectroscopic synthesis, using a new linelist in the K band, finds [Fe/H]~-1.0 and [alpha/Fe]~+0.4, consistent with stars of similar metallicity in the bulge. As known giants with comparable [Fe/H] and alpha enhancement are old, we conclude that this star is most likely to be a representative of the ~10 Gyr old population. This is also the most metal poor confirmed red giant yet discovered in vicinity of the nuclear cluster of the Galactic Center. We consider recent reports in the literature of a surprisingly large number of metal poor giants in the Galactic Center, but the reported gravities of log g ~4 for these stars calls into question their reported metallicities.
  • With the existing and upcoming large multi-fibre low-resolution spectrographs, the question arises how precise stellar parameters such as Teff and [Fe/H] can be obtained from low-resolution K-band spectra with respect to traditional photometric temperature measurements. Until now, most of the effective temperatures in galactic Bulge studies come directly from photometric techniques. Uncertainties in interstellar reddening and in the assumed extinction law could lead to large systematic errors. We aim to obtain and calibrate the relation between Teff and the $\rm ^{12}CO$ first overtone bands for M giants in the galactic Bulge covering a wide range in metallicity. We use low-resolution spectra for 20 M giants with well-studied parameters from photometric measurements covering the temperature range 3200 < Teff < 4500 K and a metallicity range from 0.5 dex down to -1.2 dex and study the behaviour of Teff and [Fe/H] on the spectral indices. We find a tight relation between Teff and the $\rm ^{12}CO(2-0)$ band with a dispersion of 95 K as well as between Teff and the $\rm ^{12}CO(3-1)$ with a dispersion of 120 K. We do not find any dependence of these relations on the metallicity of the star, making them relation attractive for galactic Bulge studies. This relation is also not sensitive to the spectral resolution allowing to apply this relation in a more general way. We also found a correlation between the combination of the NaI, CaI and the $\rm ^{12}CO$ band with the metallicity of the star. However this relation is only valid for sub-solar metallicities. We show that low-resolution spectra provide a powerful tool to obtain effective temperatures of M giants. We show that this relation does not depend on the metallicity of the star within the investigated range and is also applicable to different spectral resolution.
  • The structure, formation, and evolution of the Milky Way bulge is a matter of debate. Important diagnostics for discriminating between bulge models include alpha-abundance trends with metallicity, and spatial abundance and metallicity gradients. Due to the severe optical extinction in the inner Bulge region, only a few detailed investigations have been performed of this region. Here we aim at investigating the inner 2 degrees by observing the [alpha/Fe] element trends versus metallicity, and by trying to derive the metallicity gradient. [alpha/Fe] and metallicities have been determined by spectral synthesis of 2 micron spectra observed with VLT/CRIRES of 28 M-giants, lying along the Southern minor axis at (l,b)=(0,0), (0,-1), and (0,-2). VLT/ISAAC spectra are used to determine the effective temperature of the stars. We present the first connection between the Galactic Center and the Bulge using similar stars, high spectral resolution, and analysis techniques. The [alpha/Fe] trends in all our 3 fields show a large similarity among each other and with trends further out in the Bulge, with a lack of an [\alpha/Fe] gradient all the way into the centre. This suggests a homogeneous Bulge when it comes to the enrichment process and star-formation history. We find a large range of metallicities (-1.2<[Fe/H]<+0.3), with a lower dispersion in the Galactic center: -0.2<[Fe/H]<+0.3. The derived metallicities get in the mean, progressively higher the closer to the Galactic plane they lie. We could interpret this as a continuation of the metallicity gradient established further out in the Bulge, but due to the low number of stars and possible selection effects, more data of the same sort as presented here is necessary to conclude on the inner metallicity gradient from our data alone. Our results firmly argues for the center being in the context of the Bulge rather than very distinct.
  • Photometry alone is not sufficient to unambiguously distinguish between ultra-faint star clusters and dwarf galaxies because of their overlap in morphological properties. Here we report on VLT/GIRAFFE spectra of candidate member stars in two recently discovered ultra-faint satellites Reticulum 2 and Horologium 1, obtained as part of the ongoing Gaia-ESO Survey. We identify 18 members in Reticulum 2 and 5 in Horologium 1. We find Reticulum 2 to have a velocity dispersion of ~3.22 km/s, implying a M/L ratio of ~ 500. We have inferred stellar parameters for all candidates and we find Reticulum 2 to have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.46+/-0.1, with an intrinsic dispersion of ~ 0.29, and is alpha-enhanced to the level of [alpha/Fe]~0.4. We conclude that Reticulum 2 is a dwarf galaxy. We also report on the serendipitous discovery of four stars in a previously unknown stellar substructure near Reticulum 2 with [Fe/H] ~ -2 and V_hel ~ 220 km/s, far from the systemic velocity of Reticulum 2. For Horologium 1 we infer a velocity dispersion of 4.9^{+2.8}_{-0.9} km/s and a consequent M/L ratio of ~ 600, leading us to conclude that Horologium 1 is also a dwarf galaxy. Horologium 1 is slightly more metal-poor than Reticulum 2 [Fe/H] = -2.76 +/- 0.1 and is similarly alpha-enhanced: [alpha/Fe] ~ 0.3. Despite a large error-bar, we also measure a significant spread of metallicities of 0.17 dex which strengthen the evidence that Horologium 1 is indeed a dwarf galaxy. The line-of-sight velocity of Reticulum 2 is offset by some 100 km/s from the prediction of the orbital velocity of the LMC, thus making its association with the Cloud uncertain. However, at the location of Horologium 1, both the backward integrated LMC's orbit and the LMC's halo are predicted to have radial velocities similar to that of the dwarf. Therefore, it is likely that Horologium 1 is or once was a member of the Magellanic Family.
  • In recent years, the Galactic Center (GC) region (200 pc in radius) has been studied in detail with spectroscopic stellar data as well as an estimate of the ongoing star formation rate. The aims of this paper are to study the chemical evolution of the GC region by means of a detailed chemical evolution model and to compare the results with high resolution spectroscopic data in order to impose constraints on the GC formation history.The chemical evolution model assumes that the GC region formed by fast infall of gas and then follows the evolution of alpha-elements and Fe. We test different initial mass functions (IMFs), efficiencies of star formation and gas infall timescales. To reproduce the currently observed star formation rate, we assume a late episode of star formation triggered by gas infall/accretion. We find that, in order to reproduce the [alpha/Fe] ratios as well as the metallicity distribution function observed in GC stars, the GC region should have experienced a main early strong burst of star formation, with a star formation efficiency as high as 25 Gyr^{-1}, occurring on a timescale in the range 0.1-0.7 Gyr, in agreement with previous models of the entire bulge. Although the small amount of data prevents us from drawing firm conclusions, we suggest that the best IMF should contain more massive stars than expected in the solar vicinity, and the last episode of star formation, which lasted several hundred million years, should have been triggered by a modest episode of gas infall/accretion, with a star formation efficiency similar to that of the previous main star formation episode. This last episode of star formation produces negligible effects on the abundance patterns and can be due to accretion of gas induced by the bar. Our results exclude an important infall event as a trigger for the last starburst.
  • We present high spectral resolution (~3 km/s) observations of the nu_2 ro-vibrational band of H2O in the 6.086--6.135 micron range toward the massive protostar AFGL 2591 using the Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph (EXES) on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Ten absorption features are detected in total, with seven caused by transitions in the nu_2 band of H2O, two by transitions in the first vibrationally excited nu_2 band of H2O, and one by a transition in the nu_2 band of H2{18}O. Among the detected transitions is the nu_2 1(1,1)--0(0,0) line which probes the lowest lying rotational level of para-H2O. The stronger transitions appear to be optically thick, but reach maximum absorption at a depth of about 25%, suggesting that the background source is only partially covered by the absorbing gas, or that the absorption arises within the 6 micron emitting photosphere. Assuming a covering fraction of 25%, the H2O column density and rotational temperature that best fit the observed absorption lines are N(H2O)=(1.3+-0.3)*10^{19} cm^{-2} and T=640+-80 K.
  • A small fraction of the halo field is made up of stars that share the light element (Z<=13) anomalies characteristic of second generation globular cluster (GC) stars. The ejected stars shed light on the formation of the Galactic halo by tracing the dynamical history of the clusters, which are believed to have once been more massive. Some of these ejected stars are expected to show strong Al enhancement at the expense of shortage of Mg, but until now no such star has been found. We search for outliers in the Mg and Al abundances of the few hundreds of halo field stars observed in the first eighteen months of the Gaia-ESO public spectroscopic survey. One halo star at the base of the red giant branch, here referred to as 22593757-4648029 is found to have [Mg/Fe]=-0.36+-0.04 and [Al/Fe]=0.99+-0.08, which is compatible with the most extreme ratios detected in GCs so far. We compare the orbit of 22593757-4648029 to GCs of similar metallicity and find it unlikely that this star has been tidally stripped with low ejection velocity from any of the clusters. However, both chemical and kinematic arguments render it plausible that the star has been ejected at high velocity from the anomalous GC omega Centauri within the last few billion years. We cannot rule out other progenitor GCs, because some may have disrupted fully, and the abundance and orbital data are inadequate for many of those that are still intact.
  • The structures of the outer atmospheres of red giants are very complex. The notion of large optically thick molecular spheres around the stars (MOLspheres) has been invoked in order to explain e.g. spectro-interferometric observations. However, high-resolution spectra in the mid-IR do not easily fit into this picture. They rule out any large sphere of water vapour in LTE surrounding red giants. Our aim here is to investigate high-resolution, mid-infrared spectra for a range of red giants, from early-K to mid M. We have recorded 12 microns spectra of 10 well-studied bright red giants, with TEXES on the IRTF. We find that all giants in our study cooler than 4300 K, spanning a range of effective temperatures, show water absorption lines stronger than expected. The strengths of the lines vary smoothly with spectral type. We identify several spectral features in the wavelength region that undoubtedly are formed in the photosphere. From a study of water-line ratios of the stars, we find that the excitation temperatures, in the line-forming regions, are several hundred Kelvin lower than expected from a classical photospheric model. This could either be due to an actually lower temperature structure in the outer regions of the photospheres caused by, for example, extra cooling, or due to non-LTE level populations, affecting the source function and line opacities. We have demonstrated that these diagnostically interesting water lines are a general feature of red giants across spectral types, and we argue for a general explanation of their formation rather than explanations requiring specific properties. Since the water lines are neither weak (filled in by emission) nor appear in emission, as predicted by LTE MOLsphere models in their simplest forms, the evidence for the existence of such large optically-thick, molecular spheres enshrouding the stars is weakened. (abbreviated)
  • Context. The formation and evolution of the Milky Way bulge is still largely an unanswered question. One of the most essential observables needed in its modelling are the metallicity distribution and the trends of the alpha elements as measured in stars. While Bulge regions beyond R > 50 pc of the centre has been targeted in several surveys, the central part has escaped detailed study due to the extreme extinction and crowding. The abundance gradients from the center are, however, of large diagnostic value. Aims. We aim at investigating the Galactic Centre environment by probing M giants in the field, avoiding supergiants and cluster members. Methods. For 9 field M-giants in the Galactic Centre region, we have obtained high- and low-resolution spectra observed simultaneously with CRIRES and ISAAC on UT1 and UT3 of the VLT. The low-resolution spectra provide a means of determining the effective temperatures, and the high-resolution spectra provide detailed abundances of Fe, Mg, Si, and Ca. Results. We find a metal-rich population at [Fe/H]=+0.11+-0.15 and a lack of the metal-poor population, found further out in the Bulge, corroborating earlier studies. Our [alpha/Fe] element trends, however, show low values, following the outer Bulge trends. A possible exception of the [Ca/Fe] trend is found and needs further investigation. Conclusions. The results of the analysed field M-giants in the Galactic Centre region, excludes a scenario with rapid formation, in which SNIIe played a dominated role in the chemical enrichment of the gas. The metal-rich metallicities together with low alpha-enhancement seems to indicate a bar-like population perhaps related to the nuclear bar.
  • The Gaia-ESO Survey is obtaining high-quality spectroscopic data for about 10^5 stars using FLAMES at the VLT. UVES high-resolution spectra are being collected for about 5000 FGK-type stars. These UVES spectra are analyzed in parallel by several state-of-the-art methodologies. Our aim is to present how these analyses were implemented, to discuss their results, and to describe how a final recommended parameter scale is defined. We also discuss the precision (method-to-method dispersion) and accuracy (biases with respect to the reference values) of the final parameters. These results are part of the Gaia-ESO 2nd internal release and will be part of its 1st public release of advanced data products. The final parameter scale is tied to the one defined by the Gaia benchmark stars, a set of stars with fundamental atmospheric parameters. A set of open and globular clusters is used to evaluate the physical soundness of the results. Each methodology is judged against the benchmark stars to define weights in three different regions of the parameter space. The final recommended results are the weighted-medians of those from the individual methods. The recommended results successfully reproduce the benchmark stars atmospheric parameters and the expected Teff-log g relation of the calibrating clusters. Atmospheric parameters and abundances have been determined for 1301 FGK-type stars observed with UVES. The median of the method-to-method dispersion of the atmospheric parameters is 55 K for Teff, 0.13 dex for log g, and 0.07 dex for [Fe/H]. Systematic biases are estimated to be between 50-100 K for Teff, 0.10-0.25 dex for log g, and 0.05-0.10 dex for [Fe/H]. Abundances for 24 elements were derived: C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Mo, Ba, Nd, and Eu. The typical method-to-method dispersion of the abundances varies between 0.10 and 0.20 dex.
  • The physical structures of the outer atmospheres of red giants are not known. They are certainly complex and a range of recent observations are showing that we need to embrace to non-classical atmosphere models to interpret these regions. This region's properties is of importance, not the least, for the understanding of the mass-loss mechanism for these stars, which is not still understood. Here, we present observational constraints of the outer regions of red giants, based on mid-IR, high spectral resolution spectra. We also discuss possible non-LTE effects and highlight a new non-LTE code that will be used to analyse the spectra of these atmospheric layers. We conclude by mentioning our new SOFIA/EXES observations of red giants at 6 microns, where the vibration-rotation lines of water vapour can be detected and spectrally resolved for the first time.
  • The origin of 'cosmic' fluorine is uncertain, but there are three proposed production sites/mechanisms: AGB stars, $\nu$ nucleosynthesis in Type II supernovae, and/or the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. The relative importance of these production sites has not been established even for the solar neighborhood, leading to uncertainties in stellar evolution models of these stars as well as uncertainties in the chemical evolution models of stellar populations. We determine the fluorine and oxygen abundances in seven bright, nearby giants with well-determined stellar parameters. We use the 2.3 $\mu$m vibrational-rotational HF line and explore a pure rotational HF line at 12.2 $\mu$m. The latter has never been used before for an abundance analysis. To be able to do this we have calculated a line list for pure rotational HF lines. We find that the abundances derived from the two diagnostics agree. Our derived abundances are well reproduced by chemical evolution models only including fluorine production in AGB-stars and therefore we draw the conclusion that this might be the main production site of fluorine in the solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of using the 12 $\mu$m HF lines to determine the possible contribution of the $\nu$-process to the fluorine budget at low metallicities where the difference between models including and excluding this process is dramatic.
  • We study the relationship between age, metallicity, and alpha-enhancement of FGK stars in the Galactic disk. The results are based upon the analysis of high-resolution UVES spectra from the Gaia-ESO large stellar survey. We explore the limitations of the observed dataset, i.e. the accuracy of stellar parameters and the selection effects that are caused by the photometric target preselection. We find that the colour and magnitude cuts in the survey suppress old metal-rich stars and young metal-poor stars. This suppression may be as high as 97% in some regions of the age-metallicity relationship. The dataset consists of 144 stars with a wide range of ages from 0.5 Gyr to 13.5 Gyr, Galactocentric distances from 6 kpc to 9.5 kpc, and vertical distances from the plane 0 < |Z| < 1.5 kpc. On this basis, we find that i) the observed age-metallicity relation is nearly flat in the range of ages between 0 Gyr and 8 Gyr; ii) at ages older than 9 Gyr, we see a decrease in [Fe/H] and a clear absence of metal-rich stars; this cannot be explained by the survey selection functions; iii) there is a significant scatter of [Fe/H] at any age; and iv) [Mg/Fe] increases with age, but the dispersion of [Mg/Fe] at ages > 9 Gyr is not as small as advocated by some other studies. In agreement with earlier work, we find that radial abundance gradients change as a function of vertical distance from the plane. The [Mg/Fe] gradient steepens and becomes negative. In addition, we show that the inner disk is not only more alpha-rich compared to the outer disk, but also older, as traced independently by the ages and Mg abundances of stars.
  • Possible main formation sites of F in the Universe include AGB stars, the {\nu}-process in Type II SNe, and/or W-R stars. The importance of the W-R stars has theoretically been questioned and they are probably not needed in the modelling of the chemical evolution of F in the solar neighborhood. It has, however, been suggested that W-R stars are indeed needed to explain the chemical evolution of F in the Bulge. The molecular spectral data of the often used HF-molecule has not been presented in a complete and consistent way and has recently been debated in the literature. In this article we determine the [F/O] vs. [O/H] trend in the Bulge to investigate the possible contribution from W-R stars. Additionally, we present here a HF line list for the K- and L-bands (including the often used 23358.33 {\AA} line) and an accompanying partition function. The F abundances were determined using spectral fitting from hi-res NIR spectra of eight K giants recorded by the spectrograph CRIRES. We have also re-analyzed five previously published Bulge giants using our new HF molecular data. We find that the F-O abundance in the Bulge probably cannot be explained with chemical evolution models including only AGB-stars and the {\nu}-process in SNe Type II, i.e. a significant amount of F production in W-R stars is likely needed to explain the F abundance in the Bulge. Concerning the HF line list, we find that a possible reason for the inconsistencies in the literature, with two different excitation energies being used, is two different definitions of the zero-point energy for the HF molecule and therefore also two accompanying different dissociation energies. Both line lists are correct, as long as the corresponding consistent partition function is used in the spectral synthesis. However, we suspect this has not been the case in several earlier works leading to F abundances 0.3 dex too high.
  • Building on the experience of the high-resolution community with the suite of VLT high-resolution spectrographs, which has been tremendously successful, we outline here the (science) case for a high-fidelity, high-resolution spectrograph with wide wavelength coverage at the E-ELT. Flagship science drivers include: the study of exo-planetary atmospheres with the prospect of the detection of signatures of life on rocky planets; the chemical composition of planetary debris on the surface of white dwarfs; the spectroscopic study of protoplanetary and proto-stellar disks; the extension of Galactic archaeology to the Local Group and beyond; spectroscopic studies of the evolution of galaxies with samples that, unlike now, are no longer restricted to strongly star forming and/or very massive galaxies; the unraveling of the complex roles of stellar and AGN feedback; the study of the chemical signatures imprinted by population III stars on the IGM during the epoch of reionization; the exciting possibility of paradigm-changing contributions to fundamental physics. The requirements of these science cases can be met by a stable instrument with a spectral resolution of R~100,000 and broad, simultaneous spectral coverage extending from 370nm to 2500nm. Most science cases do not require spatially resolved information, and can be pursued in seeing-limited mode, although some of them would benefit by the E-ELT diffraction limited resolution. Some multiplexing would also be beneficial for some of the science cases. (Abridged)
  • Context. The Galactic chemical evolution of sulphur is still under debate. At low metallicities some studies find no correlation between [S/Fe] and [Fe/H], others find [S/Fe] increasing towards lower metallicities, and still others find a combination of the two. Each scenario has different implications for the Galactic chemical evolution of sulphur. Aims. To contribute to the discussion on the Galactic chemical evolution of sulphur by deriving sulphur abundances from non-LTE insensitive spectral diagnostics in Disk and Halo stars with homogeneously determined stellar parameters. Methods. We derive Teff from photometric colours, logg from stellar isochrones and Bayesian estimation, and [Fe/H] and [S/Fe] from spectrum synthesis. We derive [S/Fe] from the [S i] 1082 nm line in 39 mostly cool and metal-poor giants, using 1D LTE MARCS model atmospheres to model our high-resolution NIR spectra obtained with the VLT, NOT and Gemini South telescopes. Results. We derive homogeneous stellar parameters for 29 stars. Our results argue for a chemical evolution of sulphur that is typical for alpha-elements, contrary to some previous studies. Our abundances are systematically higher by about 0.1 dex in comparison to other studies that arrived at similar conclusions using other sulphur diagnostics. Conclusions. We find the [S i] line to be a valuable diagnostic of sulphur abundances in cool giants down to [Fe/H] ~ -2.3. We argue that a homogeneous determination of stellar parameters is necessary, since the derived abundances are sensitive to them. Our results ([S/Fe]) show reasonable agreement with predictions of contemporary models of Galactic chemical evolution. In these models sulphur is predominantly created in massive stars by oxygen burning, and ejected in the ISM during Type II SNe explosions. Systematic differences with previous studies likely fall within modelling uncertainties.
  • MOONS is a new conceptual design for a Multi-Object Optical and Near-infrared Spectrograph for the Very Large Telescope (VLT), selected by ESO for a Phase A study. The baseline design consists of 1000 fibers deployable over a field of view of 500 square arcmin, the largest patrol field offered by the Nasmyth focus at the VLT. The total wavelength coverage is 0.8um-1.8um and two resolution modes: medium resolution and high resolution. In the medium resolution mode (R=4,000-6,000) the entire wavelength range 0.8um-1.8um is observed simultaneously, while the high resolution mode covers simultaneously three selected spectral regions: one around the CaII triplet (at R=8,000) to measure radial velocities, and two regions at R=20,000 one in the J-band and one in the H-band, for detailed measurements of chemical abundances. The grasp of the 8.2m Very Large Telescope (VLT) combined with the large multiplex and wavelength coverage of MOONS - extending into the near-IR - will provide the observational power necessary to study galaxy formation and evolution over the entire history of the Universe, from our Milky Way, through the redshift desert and up to the epoch of re-ionization at z>8-9. At the same time, the high spectral resolution mode will allow astronomers to study chemical abundances of stars in our Galaxy, in particular in the highly obscured regions of the Bulge, and provide the necessary follow-up of the Gaia mission. Such characteristics and versatility make MOONS the long-awaited workhorse near-IR MOS for the VLT, which will perfectly complement optical spectroscopy performed by FLAMES and VIMOS.
  • LHS1070 is a nearby multiple system of low mass stars. It is an important source of information for probing the low mass end of the main sequence, down to the hydrogen-burning limit. The primary of the system is a mid-M dwarf and two components are late-M to early L dwarfs, at the star-brown dwarf transition. Hence LHS1070 is a valuable object to understand the onset of dust formation in cool stellar atmospheres.This work aims at determining the fundamental stellar parameters of LHS1070 and to test recent model atmospheres: BT-Dusty,BT-Settl, DRIFT, and MARCS models.Unlike in previous studies, we have performed a chi^2-minimization comparing well calibrated optical and infrared spectra with recent cool star synthetic spectra leading to the determination of the physical stellar parameters Teff, radius, and log g for each of the three components of LHS1070.
  • It is still debated whether or not the Galactic chemical evolution of sulphur in the halo followed the constant or flat trend with [Fe/H], ascribed to the result of explosive nucleosynthesis in type II SNe. The aim of this study is to try to clarify this situation by measuring the sulphur abundance in a sample of halo giants using two diagnostics; the S I triplet around 1045 nm and the [S I] line at 1082 nm. The latter of the two is not believed to be sensitive to non-LTE effects. We can thereby minimize the uncertainties in the diagnostic used and estimate the usefulness of the triplet in sulphur determination in halo K giants. We will also be able to compare our sulphur abundance differences from the two diagnostics with the expected non-LTE effects in the 1045 nm triplet previously calculated by others. High-resolution near-infrared spectra of ten K giants were recorded using the spectrometer CRIRES mounted on VLT. Two standard settings were used; one covering the S I triplet and one covering the [S I] line. The sulphur abundances were determined individually with equivalent widths and synthetic spectra for the two diagnostics using tailored 1D model atmospheres and relying on non-LTE corrections from the litterature. Effects of convective inhomogeneities in the stellar atmospheres are investigated. We corroborate the flat trend in the [S/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plot for halo stars found in other works and cannot find a scatter nor a rise in [S/Fe] obtained in some other previous studies. We find the sulphur abundances deduced from the non-LTE corrected triplet somewhat lower than the abundances from the [S I] line, possibly indicating too large non-LTE corrections. Considering 3D modeling, however, they might instead be too small. Further we show that the [S I] line is possible to use as a sulphur diagnostic down to [Fe/H] = -2.3 in giants.