• We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia supernova SN 2012fr, of which 33 were obtained before maximum light. At early times SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II 6355 line which can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity "photospheric" component. This Si II 6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of v~12,000 km/s until at least 5 weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared (IR) triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v~12,000 km/s with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as a high-velocity component beginning at v~31,000 km/s two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the "shallow silicon" and "core-normal" subclasses in the Branch et al. (2009) classification scheme, and on the border between normal and "high-velocity" SNe Ia in the Wang et al. (2009a) system. Though it is a clear member of the "low velocity gradient" (LVG; Benetii et al., 2005) group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution, and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.
  • Broad absorption line quasars (commonly termed BALQSOs) contain the most dramatic examples of AGN-driven winds. The high absorbing columns in these winds, ~10^24 cm^-2, ensure that BALQSOs are generally X-ray faint. This high X-ray absorption means that almost all BALQSOs have been discovered through optical surveys, and so what little we know about their X-ray properties is derived from very bright optically-selected sources. A small number of X-ray selected BALQSOs (XBALQSOs) have, however, recently been found in deep X-ray survey fields. In this paper we investigate the X-ray and rest-frame UV properties of five XBALQSOs for which we have obtained XMM-Newton EPIC X-ray spectra and deep optical imaging and spectroscopy. We find that, although the XBALQSOs have an alpha_ox steeper by ~0.5 than normal QSOs, their median alpha_ox is nevertheless flatter by 0.30 than that of a comparable sample of optically selected BALQSOs (OBALQSOs). We rule out the possibility that the higher X-ray to optical flux ratio is due to intrinsic optical extinction. We find that the amount of X-ray and UV absorption due to the wind in XBALQSOs is similar, or perhaps greater than, the corresponding wind absorption in OBALQSOs, so the flatter alpha_ox cannot be a result of weaker wind absorption. We conclude that these XBALQSOs have intrinsically higher X-ray to optical flux ratios than the OBALQSO sample with which we compare them.
  • We present the XMM-Newton Medium sensitivity Survey (XMS), including a total of 318 X-ray sources found among the serendipitous content of 25 XMM-Newton target fields. The XMS comprises four largely overlapping source samples selected at soft (0.5-2 keV), intermediate (0.5-4.5 keV), hard (2-10 keV) and ultra-hard (4.5-7.5 keV) bands, the first three of them being flux-limited. We report on the optical identification of the XMS samples, complete to 85-95%. At the intermediate flux levels sampled by the XMS we find that the X-ray sky is largely dominated by Active Galactic Nuclei. The fraction of stars in soft X-ray selected samples is below 10%, and only a few per cent for hard selected samples. We find that the fraction of optically obscured objects in the AGN population stays constant at around 15-20% for soft and intermediate band selected X-ray sources, over 2 decades of flux. The fraction of obscured objects amongst the AGN population is larger (~35-45%) in the hard or ultra-hard selected samples, and constant across a similarly wide flux range. The distribution in X-ray-to-optical flux ratio is a strong function of the selection band, with a larger fraction of sources with high values in hard selected samples. Sources with X-ray-to-optical flux ratios in excess of 10 are dominated by obscured AGN, but with a significant contribution from unobscured AGN.
  • We present the results of a deep 610 MHz survey of the 1^H XMM/Chandra survey area with the GMRT. The resulting maps have a resolution of ~7 arcsec and an rms noise limit of 60 microJy. To a 5 sigma detection limit of 300 microJy we detect 223 sources within a survey area of diameter 64 arcmin. We compute the 610 MHz source counts and compare them to those measured at other radio wavelengths. The well know flattening of the Euclidean-normalised 1.4 GHz source counts below ~2 mJy, usually explained by a population of starburst galaxies undergoing luminosity evolution, is seen at 610 MHz. The 610 MHz source counts can be modelled by the same populations that explain the 1.4 GHz source counts, assuming a spectral index of -0.7 for the starburst galaxies and the steep spectrum AGN population. We find a similar dependence of luminosity evolution on redshift for the starburst galaxies at 610 MHz as is found at 1.4 GHz (i.e. 'Q'= 2.45 (+0.3,-0.4)).
  • We investigate the relation between the mass of super-massive black holes (Mbh) in QSOs and the mass of the dark matter halos hosting them (Mdh). We measure the widths of broad emission lines (Mgii lambda 2798, Civ lambda 1549) from QSO composite spectra as a function of redshift. These widths are then used to determine virial black hole mass estimates. We compare our virial black hole mass estimates to dark matter halo masses for QSO hosts derived by Croom et al. (2005) based on measurements of QSO clustering. This enables us to trace the Mbh-Mdh relation over the redshift range z=0.5 to 2.5. We calculate the mean zero-point of the Mbh-Mdh relation to be Mbh=10^(8.4+/-0.2)Msun for an Mdh=10^(12.5)Msun. These data are then compared with several models connecting Mbh and Mdh as well as recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution. We note that the flux limited nature of QSO samples can cause a Malmquist-type bias in the measured zero-point of the Mbh-Mdh relation. The magnitude of this bias depends on the scatter in the Mbh-Mdh relation, and we reevaluate the zero-point assuming three published values for this scatter. (abridged)
  • We present the results of a deep X-ray survey conducted with XMM-Newton, centred on the UK ROSAT 13H deep field area. This region covers 0.18 deg^2 and is the first of two areas covered with XMM-Newton as part of an extensive multi-wavelength survey designed to study the nature and evolution of the faint X-ray source population. We have produced detailed Monte-Carlo simulations to obtain a quantitative characterisation of the source detection procedure and to assess the reliability of the resultant sourcelist. We use the simulations to establish a likelihood threshold above which we expect less than 7 (3%) of our sources to be spurious. We present the final catalogue of 225 sources. Within the central 9 arcmin, 68 per cent of source positions are accurate to 2 arcsec, making optical follow-up relatively straightforward. We construct the N(>S) relation in four energy bands: 0.2-0.5 keV, 0.5-2 keV, 2-5 keV and 5-10 keV. In all but our highest energy band we find that the source counts can be represented by a double powerlaw with a bright end slope consistent with the Euclidean case and a break around 10^-14 cgs. Below this flux the counts exhibit a flattening. Our source counts reach densities of 700, 1300, 900 and 300 deg^-2 at fluxes of 4.1x10^-16, 4.5x10^-16, 1.1x10^-15 and 5.3x10^-15 cgs in the 0.2-0.5, 0.5-2, 2-5 and 5-10 keV energy bands respectively. We have compared our source counts with those in the two Chandra deep fields and Lockman hole and find our source counts to be amongst the highest of these fields in all energy bands. We resolve >51% (>50%) of the X-ray background emission in the 1-2 keV (2-5 keV) energy bands.
  • We present an analysis of the X-ray properties of sources detected in the 13H XMM-Newton deep (200ks) field. In order to constrain the absorbed AGN population, we use extensive Monte Carlo simulations to directly compare the X-ray colours of observed sources with those predicted by several model distributions. We have tested the simplest form of the AGN unified scheme, whereby the intrinsic XLF of absorbed AGN is set to be the same as that of their unabsorbed brethren, coupled with various model distributions of absorption. The best fitting of these models sets the fraction of AGN with absorbing column NH, proportional to (logNH)^8. We have also tested two extensions to the unified scheme: an evolving absorption scenario, and a luminosity dependent model distribution. Both of these provide poorer matches to the observed X-ray colour distributions than the best fitting simple unified model. We find that a luminosity dependent density evolution XLF reproduces poorly the 0.5-2 keV source counts seen in the 13H field. Field to field variations could be the cause of this disparity. Computing the simulated X-ray colours with a simple absorbed power-law + reflection spectral model is found to over-predict, by a factor of two, the fraction of hard sources that are completely absorbed below 0.5 keV, implying that an additional source of soft-band flux must be present for a number of the absorbed sources. Finally, we show that around 40% of the 13H sample are expected to be AGN with NH>10^22 cm^-2.