• We present results of our survey for planetary transits in the field of NGC 6940. We think nearly all of our observed stars are field stars. We have obtained high precision (3-10 millimags at the bright end) photometric observations of 50,000 stars spanning 18 nights in an attempt to identify low amplitude and short period transit events. We have used a matched filter analysis to identify 14 stars that show multiple events, and four stars that show single transits. Of these 18 candidates, we have identified two that should be further researched. However, none of the candidates are convincing hot Jupiters.
  • We present results from 30 nights of observations of the open cluster NGC 7789 with the WFC camera on the INT telescope in La Palma. From ~900 epochs, we obtained lightcurves and Sloan r-i colours for ~33000 stars, with ~2400 stars with better than 1% precision. We expected to detect ~2 transiting hot Jupiter planets if 1% of stars host such a companion and that a typical hot Jupiter radius is ~1.2RJ. We find 24 transit candidates, 14 of which we can assign a period. We rule out the transiting planet model for 21 of these candidates using various robust arguments. For 2 candidates we are unable to decide on their nature, although it seems most likely that they are eclipsing binaries as well. We have one candidate exhibiting a single eclipse for which we derive a radius of 1.81+0.09-0.00RJ. Three candidates remain that require follow-up observations in order to determine their nature.
  • We present results from our survey for planetary transits in the field of the intermediate age (~2.5 Gyr), metal-rich ([Fe/H]~+0.07) open cluster NGC 6819. We have obtained high-precision time-series photometry for over 38,000 stars in this field and have developed an effective matched-filter algorithm to search for photometric transits. This algorithm identified 8 candidate stars showing multiple transit-like events, plus 3 stars with single eclipses. On closer inspection, while most are shown to be low mass stellar binaries, some of these events could be due to brown dwarf companions. The data for one of the single-transit candidates indicates a minimum radius for the companion similar to that of HD 209458b.
  • We are using the Isaac Newton Telescope Wide Field Camera to survey open cluster fields for transiting hot Jupiter planets. Clusters were selected on the basis of visibility, richness of stars, age and metallicity. Observations of NGC 6819, 6940 and 7789 began in 1999 and continued in 2000. We have developed an effective matched-filter transit-detection algorithm which has proved its ability to identify very low amplitude eclipse events in real data. Here we present our results for NGC 6819. We have identified 7 candidates showing transit-like events. Colour information suggests that most of the companion bodies are likely to be very-low-mass stars or brown dwarfs, intrinsically interesting objects in their own right.