• Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements of a plasma generated by irradiating a Cr target using 60 picosecond (ps) and 300 ps laser pulses is carried out to investigate the variation in the linewidth ($\delta\lambda$) of emission from neutrals and ions for increasing ambient pressures. Measurements ranging from 10$^{-6}$ Torr to 10$^2$ Torr show a distinctly different variation in the $\delta\lambda$ of neutrals (Cr I) compared to that of singly ionized Cr (Cr II), for both irradiations. $\delta\lambda$ increases monotonously with pressure for Cr II, but an oscillation is evident at intermediate pressures for Cr I. This oscillation does not depend on the laser pulse widths used. In spite of the differences in the plasma formation mechanisms, it is experimentally found that there is an optimum intermediate background pressure for which $\delta\lambda$ of neutrals drops to a minimum. Importantly, these results underline the fact that for intermediate pressures, the usual practice of calculating the plasma number density from the $\delta\lambda$ of neutrals needs to be judiciously done, to avoid reaching inaccurate conclusions.
  • Experimental characterization and comparison of the temporal features of plasma produced by ultrafast (100 fs, 800 nm) and short-pulse (7ns, 1064 nm) laser pulses from a high purity nickel and zinc targets, expanding into a nitrogen background, are presented. The experiment is carried out under a wide pressure range of 10^-6 to 10^2 Torr, where the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly when the pressure approaches 1 Torr. Electron temperature (Te) is calculated from OES and is found to be independent of pressure for ultrafast excitation, whereas an enhancement in Te is observed around milliTorr regime for short-pulse excitation.The velocity measurements indicate acceleration of the fast species to a certain distance upon plume expansion, whereas the slow species are found to decelerate, particularly at higher pressures.A comparison of the time of flight dynamics of neutrals and ions in the LPPs generated by intense laser pulses confirms that the fast species observed are due to the recombination of fast ions with relatively slow moving electrons. Furthermore, an asynchronous pump-probe scheme is employed in the experiment that uses a Q-switched (1064 nm, 7ns) laser for plasma generation and the plasma thus generated is probed using a low power 100 fs, 82 MHz pulse train, which allows the probing of the transient LPP at every 12 ns intervals.