• We present a novel, ultra-bright atom-laser and ultra-cold thermal atom beam. Using rf-radiation we strongly couple the magnetic hyperfine levels of 87Rb atoms in a magnetically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate. At low rf-frequencies gravity opens a small hole in the trapping potenital and a well collimated, extremely bright atom laser emerges from just below the condensate. As opposed to traditional atom lasers based on weak coupling, this technique allows us to outcouple atoms at an arbitrarily large rate. We demonstrate an increase in flux per atom in the BEC by a factor of sixteen compared to the brightest quasi-continuous atom laser. Furthermore, we produce by two orders of magnitude the coldest thermal atom beam to date (200 nK).
  • The profiles of narrow lattice solitons are calculated analytically using perturbation analysis. A stability analysis shows that solitons centered at a lattice (potential) maximum are unstable, as they drift toward the nearest lattice minimum. This instability can, however, be so weak that the soliton is ``mathematically unstable'' but ``physically stable''. Stability of solitons centered at a lattice minimum depends on the dimension of the problem and on the nonlinearity. In the subcritical and supercritical cases, the lattice does not affect the stability, leaving the solitons stable and unstable, respectively. In contrast, in the critical case (e.g., a cubic nonlinearity in two transverse dimensions), the lattice stabilizes the (previously unstable) solitons. The stability in this case can be so weak, however, that the soliton is ``mathematically stable'' but ``physically unstable''.