• Galaxies with stellar masses near M* contain the majority of stellar mass in the universe, and are therefore of special interest in the study of galaxy evolution. The Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) have present day stellar masses near M*, at 5x10^10 Msol (MW-mass) and 10^11 Msol (M31-mass). We study the typical progenitors of these galaxies using ZFOURGE, a deep medium-band near-IR imaging survey, which is sensitive to the progenitors of these galaxies out to z~3. We use abundance-matching techniques to identify the main progenitors of these galaxies at higher redshifts. We measure the evolution in the stellar mass, rest-frame colors, morphologies, far-IR luminosities, and star-formation rates combining our deep multiwavelength imaging with near-IR HST imaging from CANDELS, and far-IR imaging from GOODS-H and CANDELS-H. The typical MW-mass and M31-mass progenitors passed through the same evolution stages, evolving from blue, star-forming disk galaxies at the earliest stages, to redder dust-obscured IR-luminous galaxies in intermediate stages, and to red, more quiescent galaxies at their latest stages. The progenitors of the MW-mass galaxies reached each evolutionary stage at later times (lower redshifts) and with stellar masses that are a factor of 2-3 lower than the progenitors of the M31-mass galaxies. The process driving this evolution, including the suppression of star-formation in present-day M* galaxies requires an evolving stellar-mass/halo-mass ratio and/or evolving halo-mass threshold for quiescent galaxies. The effective size and star-formation rates imply that the baryonic cold-gas fractions drop as galaxies evolve from high redshift to z~0 and are strongly anticorrelated with an increase in the S\'ersic index. Therefore, the growth of galaxy bulges in M* galaxies corresponds to a rapid decline in the galaxy gas fractions and/or a decrease in the star-formation efficiency.
  • Identification of metal-poor stars among field stars is extremely useful for studying the structure and evolution of the Galaxy and of external galaxies. We search for metal-poor stars using the artificial neural network (ANN) and extend its usage to determine absolute magnitudes. We have constructed a library of 167 medium-resolution stellar spectra (R ~ 1200) covering the stellar temperature range of 4200 to 8000 K, log g range of 0.5 to 5.0, and [Fe/H] range of -3.0 to +0.3 dex. This empirical spectral library was used to train ANNs, yielding an accuracy of 0.3 dex in [Fe/H], 200 K in temperature, and 0.3 dex in log g. We found that the independent calibrations of near-solar metallicity stars and metal-poor stars decreases the errors in T_eff and log g by nearly a factor of two. We calculated T_eff, log g, and [Fe/H] on a consistent scale for a large number of field stars and candidate metal-poor stars. We extended the application of this method to the calibration of absolute magnitudes using nearby stars with well-estimated parallaxes. A better calibration accuracy for M_V could be obtained by training separate ANNs for cool, warm, and metal-poor stars. The current accuracy of M_V calibration is (+-)0.3 mag. A list of newly identified metal-poor stars is presented. The M_V calibration procedure developed here is reddening-independent and hence may serve as a powerful tool in studying galactic structure.
  • We present the first results of a survey of the [CII]158um emission line in 241 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) comprising the Great Observatories All-sky Survey (GOALS) sample, obtained with the PACS instrument on board Herschel. The [CII] luminosities of the LIRGs in GOALS range from ~10^7 to 2x10^9 Lsun. We find that LIRGs show a tight correlation of [CII]/FIR with far-IR flux density ratios, with a strong negative trend spanning from ~10^-2 to 10^-4, as the average temperature of dust increases. We find correlations between the [CII]/FIR ratio and the strength of the 9.7um silicate absorption feature as well as with the luminosity surface density of the mid-IR emitting region (Sigma_MIR), suggesting that warmer, more compact starbursts have substantially smaller [CII]/FIR ratios. Pure star-forming (SF) LIRGs have a mean [CII]/FIR ~ 4x10^-3, while galaxies with low 6.2um PAH equivalent widths (EWs), indicative of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN), span the full range in [CII]/FIR. However, we show that even when only pure SF galaxies are considered, the [CII]/FIR ratio drops by an order of magnitude, from 10^-2 to 10^-3, with Sigma_MIR and Sigma_IR, implying that the [CII] luminosity is not a good indicator of the star formation rate (SFR) for most LIRGs, for it does not scale linearly with the warm dust emission. Moreover, even in LIRGs in which we detect an AGN in the mid-IR, the majority (2/3) of galaxies show [CII]/FIR >= 10^-3 typical of high 6.2um PAH EW sources, suggesting that most AGNs do not contribute significantly to the far-IR emission. We provide an empirical relation between the [CII]/FIR and the specific SFR (SSFR) for SF LIRGs. Finally, we present predictions for the starburst size based on the observed [CII] and far-IR luminosities which should be useful for comparing with results from future surveys of high-redshift galaxies with ALMA and CCAT.
  • The optical properties of the z = 0.435 quasar PKS 1222+216 (4C+21.35) are summarized since the discovery of impressive gamma-ray activity in this source by Fermi/LAT. Unlike several other gamma-ray-bright blazars, there appears to be little connection between optical and gamma-ray activity. Spectropolarimetry shows this object to be a composite system with optical emission from both a polarized, variable synchrotron power-law and unpolarized light from a stable blue continuum source (+broad emission-line region) contributing to the observed spectrum. Spectrophotometry over a period of about two years does not detect significant variability in the strong, broad emission lines, despite large optical continuum variations. This suggests that the relativistic jet has little influence on the output of the broad emission-line region, possibly either because the highly beamed continuum ionizes only a small portion of the line-emitting gas, or the observed non-thermal continuum originates parsecs downstream from the base of the jet, further away from the central engine than the broad emission-line region.
  • We use new WFC3 observations of the nearby grand design spiral galaxy M83 to develop two independent methods for estimating the ages of young star clusters. The first method uses the physical extent and morphology of Halpha emission to estimate the ages of clusters younger than tau ~10 Myr. It is based on the simple premise that the gas in very young (tau < few Myr) clusters is largely coincident with the cluster stars, is in a small, ring-like structure surrounding the stars in slightly older clusters (e.g., tau ~5 Myr), and is in a larger ring-like bubble for still older clusters (i.e., ~5-10 Myr). The second method is based on an observed relation between pixel-to-pixel flux variations within clusters and their ages. This method relies on the fact that the brightest individual stars in a cluster are most prominent at ages around 10 Myr, and fall below the detection limit (i.e., M_V < -3.5) for ages older than about 100 Myr. These two methods are the basis for a new morphological classification system which can be used to estimate the ages of star clusters based on their appearance. We compare previous age estimates of clusters in M83 determined from fitting UBVI Halpha measurements using predictions from stellar evolutionary models with our new morphological categories and find good agreement at the ~95% level. The scatter within categories is ~0.1 dex in log tau for young clusters (<10 Myr) and ~0.5 dex for older (>10 Myr) clusters. A by-product of this study is the identification of 22 "single-star" HII regions in M83, with central stars having ages ~4 Myr.
  • We report on the results of a visual search for galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses over 650 arcmin^2 of HST/ACS imaging in the DEEP2-EGS field. In addition to a previously-known Einstein Cross (the "Cross," HST J141735+52264, with z_lens=0.8106 and a published z_source=3.40), we identify two new strong galaxy-galaxy lenses with multiple extended arcs. The first, HST J141820+52361 (the ``Dewdrop''; z_lens=0.5798, lenses two distinct extended sources into two pairs of arcs z_source=0.while), 9818 the second, HST J141833+52435 (the ``Anchor''; z_lens=0.4625), produces a single pair of arcs (source redshift not yet known). All three definite lenses are fit well by simple singular isothermal ellipsoid models including external shear. Using the three-dimensional line-of-sight (LOS) information on galaxies from the DEEP2 data, we calculate the convergence and shear contributions, assuming singular isothermal sphere halos truncated at 200 h^-1 kpc. These are also compared against three-dimensional local-density estimates. We find that even strong lenses in demonstrably underdense local environments may be considerably affected by LOS contributions, which in turn, may be underestimates of the effect of large scale structure.
  • We use the ages, masses and metallicities of the rich young star cluster systems in the nearby starburst galaxies NGC 3310 and NGC 6745 to derive their cluster formation histories and subsequent evolution. We further expand our analysis of the systematic uncertainties involved in the use of broad-band observations to derive these parameters by examining the effects of a priori assumptions on the individual cluster metallicities. The age (and metallicity) distributions of both the clusters in the circumnuclear ring in NGC 3310 and of those outside the ring are statistically indistinguishable, but there is a clear and significant excess of higher-mass clusters IN the ring compared to the non-ring cluster sample; it is likely that the physical conditions in the starburst ring may be conducive for the formation of higher-mass star clusters, on average, than in the relatively more quiescent environment of the main galactic disc. For the NGC 6745 cluster system we derive a median age of ~10 Myr. NGC 6745 contains a significant population of high-mass "super star clusters", with masses in the range 6.5 <= log(M_cl/M_sun) <= 8.0. This detection supports the scenario that such objects form preferentially in the extreme environments of interacting galaxies. The age of the cluster populations in both NGC 3310 and NGC 6745 is significantly lower than their respective characteristic cluster disruption time-scales. This allows us to obtain an independent estimate of the INITIAL cluster mass function slope, alpha = 2.04(+- 0.23)(+0.13)(-0.43) for NGC 3310, and 1.96(+- 0.15)(+- 0.19) for NGC 6745, respectively, for masses M_cl >= 10^5 M_sun and M_cl >= 4 x 10^5 M_sun. These mass function slopes are consistent with those of other young star cluster systems in interacting and starburst galaxies.
  • We use the Main Sequence stars in the LMC cluster NGC 1866 and of Red Clump stars in the local field to obtain two independent estimates of the LMC distance. We apply an empirical Main Sequence-fitting technique based on a large sample of subdwarfs with accurate {\sl Hipparcos} parallaxes in order to estimate the cluster distance modulus, and the multicolor Red Clump method to derive distance and reddening of the LMC field. We find that the Main Sequence-fitting and the Red Clump distance moduli are in significant disagreement; NGC 1866 distance is equal to $\rm (m-M)_{0,NGC 1866}=18.33\pm$0.08 (consistent with a previous estimate using the same data and theoretical Main Sequence isochrones), while the field stars provide $\rm (m-M)_{0,field}=18.53\pm$0.07. This difference reflects the more general dichotomy in the LMC distance estimates found in the literature. Various possible causes for this disagreement are explored, with particular attention paid to the still uncertain metallicity of the cluster and the star formation history of the field stars.
  • We report new results on the LMC globular cluster NGC 1866 obtained by analyzing F555W and F814W images from WFPC2@HST. On the basis of the CMD we derive information on the cluster distance and constraints on stellar evolution theory. Evidence of mass segregation are found in the cluster core.