• Topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) possess metallic surface states protected by crystalline symmetry, which are a versatile platform for exploring topological phenomena and potential applications. However, progress in this field has been hindered by the challenge to probe optical and transport properties of the surface states owing to the presence of bulk carriers. Here we report infrared (IR) reflectance measurements of a TCI, (001) oriented $Pb_{1-x}Sn_{x}Se$ in zero and high magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the far-IR conductivity is unexpectedly dominated by the surface states as a result of their unique band structure and the consequent small IR penetration depth. Moreover, our experiments yield a surface mobility of 40000 $cm^{2}/(Vs)$, which is one of the highest reported values in topological materials, suggesting the viability of surface-dominated conduction in thin TCI crystals. These findings pave the way for exploring many exotic transport and optical phenomena and applications predicted for TCIs.
  • We perform an in-plane optical spectroscopy measurement on high quality FeSe single crystals grown by a vapor transport technique. Below the structural transition at $T_{\rm s}\sim$90 K, the reflectivity spectrum clearly shows a gradual suppression around 400 cm$^{-1}$ and the conductivity spectrum shows a peak at higher frequency. The energy scale of this gap-like feature is comparable to the width of the band splitting observed by ARPES. The low-frequency conductivity consists of two Drude components and the overall plasma frequency is smaller than that of the FeAs based compounds, suggesting a lower carrier density or stronger correlation effect. The plasma frequency becomes even smaller below $T_{\rm s}$ which agrees with the very small Fermi energy estimated by other experiments. Similar to iron pnictides, a clear temperature-induced spectral weight transfer is observed for FeSe, being indicative of strong correlation effect.
  • Varying the superconducting transition temperature over a large scale of a cuprate superconductor is a necessary step for identifying the unsettled mechanism of superconductivity. Chemical doping or element substitution has been proven to be effective but also brings about lattice disorder. Such disorder can completely destroy superconductivity even at a fixed doping level. Pressure has been thought to be the most clean method for tuning superconductivity. However, pressure-induced increase of disorder was recognized from recent experiments. By choosing a disordered Tl$_{2}$Ba$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+\delta}$ at the optimal doping, we perform single-crystal x-ray diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements at high pressures. The obtained structural data provides evidence for the robust feature for the disorder of this material in the pressure range studied. This feature ensures the pressure effects on superconductivity distinguishable from the disorder. The derived parabolic-like behavior of the transition temperature with pressure up to near 30 GPa, having a maximum around 7 GPa, offers a platform for testing any realistic theoretical models in a nearly constant disorder environment. Such a behavior can be understood when considering the carrier concentration and the pairing interaction strength as two pressure intrinsic variables.
  • We use scanning tunneling microscopy to map the surface structure, nanoscale electronic inhomogeneity, and vitreous vortex phase in the hole-doped superconductor Sr$_{0.75}$K$_{0.25}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ with $T_c$=32 K. We find the low-$T$ cleaved surface is dominated by a half-Sr/K termination with $1\times 2$ ordering and ubiquitous superconducting gap, while patches of gapless, unreconstructed As termination appear rarely. The superconducting gap varies by $\sigma/\bar{\Delta}$=16% on a $\sim$3 nm length scale, with average $2\bar{\Delta}/k_B T_c=3.6$ in the weak coupling limit. The vortex core size provides a measure of the superconducting coherence length $\xi$=2.3 nm. We quantify the vortex lattice correlation length at 9 T in comparison to several iron-based superconductors. The comparison leads us to suggest the importance of dopant size mismatch as a cause of dopant clustering, electronic inhomogeneity, and strong vortex pinning.
  • We report resistivity measurements performed on KFe$_2$As$_2$ single crystals down to $T$ = 0.3 K and in magnetic fields up to 17.5 T. The in-plane resistivity vs. $T$ curve has a convex shape down to $\sim$50 K and shows a $T^2$ dependence below $\sim$45 K. The ratio of the c-axis to in-plane resistivities is $\sim$10 at room temperature and $\sim$40 at 4.2 K. The superconducting upper critical field $B_{c2}(T)$ has been determined from the resistivity data: $B_{c2}^{ab}$(0) = 4.47 T and $B_{c2}^{c}$(0) = 1.25 T. The anisotropy parameter $\Gamma$ = $B_{c2}^{ab}$ / $B_{c2}^{c}$ increases with $T$ and is 6.8 at $T$ = $T_c$. The strong curvature of the $B_{c2}^{ab}(T)$ curve indicates the existence of strong spin paramagnetic effects.