• We present the results of the systematic study of all magnetar outbursts observed to date, through a reanalysis of data acquired in about 1100 X-ray observations. We track the temporal evolution of the outbursts soft X-ray spectral properties and the luminosities of the single spectral components as well as of the total emission. We model empirically all outburst light curves, and estimate the characteristic decay time-scales as well as the energetics involved. We investigate the link between different parameters (e.g. the luminosity at the peak of the outburst and in quiescence, the maximum luminosity increase, the decay time-scale and energy of the outburst, the neutron star surface dipolar magnetic field and characteristic age, etc.), and unveil several correlations among these quantities. We discuss our results in the context of the internal crustal heating and twisted bundle models for magnetar outbursts. This study is complemented by the Magnetar Outburst Online Catalogue (http://magnetars.ice.csic.es), an interactive data base where the user can plot any combination of the parameters derived in this work, and download all data.
  • Monitoring of Sagittarius A* from X-ray to radio wavelengths has revealed structured variability --- including X-ray flares --- but it is challenging to establish correlations between them. Most studies have focused on variability in the X-ray and infrared, where variations are often simultaneous, and because long time series at sub-millimeter and radio wavelengths are limited. Previous work on sub-mm and radio variability hints at a lag between X-ray flares and their candidate sub-millimeter or radio counterparts, with the long wavelength data lagging the X-ray. However, there is only one published time lag between an X-ray flare and a possible radio counterpart. Here we report 9 contemporaneous X-ray and radio observations of Sgr A*. We detect significant radio variability peaking $\gtrsim$176 minutes after the brightest X-ray flare ever detected from Sgr A*. We also report other potentially associated X-ray and radio variability, with the radio peaks appearing $\lesssim$80 minutes after these weaker X-ray flares. Taken at face value, these results suggest that stronger X-ray flares lead to longer time lags in the radio. However, we also test the possibility that the variability at X-ray and radio wavelengths is not temporally correlated. We cross-correlate data from mismatched X-ray and radio epochs and obtain comparable correlations to the matched data. Hence, we find no overall statistical evidence that X-ray flares and radio variability are correlated, underscoring a need for more simultaneous, long duration X-ray--radio monitoring of Sgr A*.
  • Considering about seven years of Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data, we present a systematic search for variability possibly related to transitions between states in redbacks and black widow systems. Transitions are characterized by sudden and significant changes in the gamma-ray flux that persist on a timescale much larger than the orbital period. This phenomenology was already detected in the case of two redback systems, PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1227-4853, for which we present here a dedicated study. We show the existence of only one transition for each of these systems over the past seven years. We determine their spectra, establishing high-energy cutoffs at a few GeV for the high gamma-ray state of PSR J1023+0038 and for both states of PSR J1227-4853. The surveying capability of the Fermi-LAT allows studying whether similar phenomenology has occurred in other sources. Although we have not found any hint for a state transition for most of the studied pulsars, we note two black-widow systems, PSR J2234+0944 and PSR J1446-4701, whose apparent variability is reminiscent of the transitions in PSR J1023+0038 and PSR J1227-4853. For the other systems we set limits on potential transitions in their measured gamma-ray light curves.
  • AE Aquarii (AE Aqr) is a cataclysmic binary hosting one of the fastest rotating (P$_{\rm spin}$ = 33.08 s) white dwarfs known. Based on seven years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data, we report on a deep search for gamma-ray emission from AE Aqr. Using X-ray observations from ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, Swift, Suzaku, and NuSTAR, spanning 20 years, we substantially extend and improve the spin ephemeris of AE Aqr. Using this ephemeris, we searched for gamma-ray pulsations at the spin period of the white dwarf. No gamma-ray pulsations were detected above 3 $\sigma$ significance. Neither phase-averaged gamma-ray emission nor gamma-ray variability of AE Aquarii is detected by Fermi-LAT. We impose the most restrictive upper limit to the gamma-ray flux from AE Aqr to date: $1.3\times 10^{-12}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the 100 MeV-300 GeV energy range, providing constraints on models.
  • The 6.67 hr periodicity and the variable X-ray flux of the central compact object (CCO) at the center of the SNR RCW 103, named 1E 161348-5055, have been always difficult to interpret within the standard scenarios of an isolated neutron star or a binary system. On 2016 June 22, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift detected a magnetar-like short X-ray burst from the direction of 1E 161348-5055, also coincident with a large long-term X-ray outburst. Here we report on Chandra, NuSTAR, and Swift (BAT and XRT) observations of this peculiar source during its 2016 outburst peak. In particular, we study the properties of this magnetar-like burst, we discover a hard X-ray tail in the CCO spectrum during outburst, and we study its long-term outburst history (from 1999 to July 2016). We find the emission properties of 1E 161348-5055 consistent with it being a magnetar. However in this scenario, the 6.67 hr periodicity can only be interpreted as the rotation period of this strongly magnetized neutron star, which therefore represents the slowest pulsar ever detected, by orders of magnitude. We briefly discuss the viable slow-down scenarios, favoring a picture involving a period of fall-back accretion after the supernova explosion, similarly to what is invoked (although in a different regime) to explain the "anti-magnetar" scenario for other CCOs.
  • Based on more than seven years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data, we report on a detailed analysis of the bright gamma-ray pulsar (PSR) J0007+7303. We confirm that PSR J0007+7303 is significantly detected as a point source also during the off-peak phases with a TS value of 262 ($\sim$ 16 $\sigma$). In the description of PSR J0007+7303 off-peak spectrum, a power law with an exponential cutoff at 2.7$\pm$1.2$\pm$1.3 GeV (the first/second uncertainties correspond to statistical/systematic errors) is preferred over a single power law at a level of 3.5 $\sigma$. The possible existence of a cutoff hints at a magnetospheric origin of the emission. In addition, no extended gamma-ray emission is detected compatible with either the supernova remnant (CTA 1) or the very high energy (> 100 GeV) pulsar wind nebula. A flux upper limit of 6.5$\times$10$^{-12}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ in the 10-300 GeV energy range is reported, for an extended source assuming the morphology of the VERITAS detection. During on-peak phases, a sub-exponential cutoff is significantly preferred ($\sim$11 $\sigma$) for representing the spectral energy distribution, both in the phase-averaged and in the phase-resolved spectra. Three glitches are detected during the observation period and we found no flux variability at the time of the glitches or in the long-term behavior. We also report the discovery of a previously unknown gamma-ray source in the vicinity of PSR J0007+7303, Fermi J0020+7328, which we associate with the z = 1.781 quasar S5 0016+73. A concurrent analysis of this source is needed to correctly characterize the behavior of CTA 1 and it is also presented in the paper.
  • We report on the search for gamma-ray emission from 20 magnetars using 6 years of Fermi, Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations. No significant evidence for gamma-ray emission from any of the currently-known magnetars is found. We derived the most stringent upper limits to date on the 0.1--10 GeV emission of Galactic magnetars, which are estimated between $\sim10^{-12}-10^{-11}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. Gamma-ray pulsations were searched for the four magnetars having reliable ephemerides over the observing period, but none were detected. On the other hand, we also studied the gamma-ray morphology and spectra of seven Supernova Remnants associated or adjacent to the magnetars.
  • The X-ray source RX J2015.6+3711 was discovered by ROSAT in 1996 and recently proposed to be a cataclysmic variable (CV). Here we report on an XMM-Newton observation of RX J2015.6+3711 performed in 2014, where we detected a coherent X-ray modulation at a period of 7196+/-11 s, and discovered other significant (>6sigma) small-amplitude periodicities which we interpret as the CV spin period and the sidebands of a possible ~12 hr periodicity, respectively. The 0.3-10 keV spectrum can be described by a power law (Gamma = 1.15+/-0.04) with a complex absorption pattern, a broad emission feature at 6.60+/-0.01 keV, and an unabsorbed flux of (3.16+/-0.05)x10^{-12} erg/s/cm^2. We observed a significant spectral variability along the spin phase, which can be ascribed mainly to changes in the density of a partial absorber and the power law normalization. Archival X-ray observations carried out by the Chandra satellite, and two simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical pointings with Swift, revealed a gradual fading of the source in the soft X-rays over the last 13 years, and a rather stable X-ray-to-optical flux ratio (F_X/F_V ~1.4-1.7). Based on all these properties, we identify this source with a magnetic CV, most probably of the intermediate polar type. The 2 hr spin period makes RX J2015.6+3711 the second slowest rotator of the class, after RX J0524+4244 ("Paloma", P_spin~2.3 hr). Although we cannot unambiguously establish the true orbital period with these observations, RX J2015.6+3711 appears to be a key system in the evolution of magnetic CVs.
  • We study the timing and spectral properties of the low-magnetic field, transient magnetar SWIFT J1822.3-1606 as it approached quiescence. We coherently phase-connect the observations over a time-span of ~500 days since the discovery of SWIFT J1822.3-1606 following the Swift-BAT trigger on 2011 July 14, and carried out a detailed pulse phase spectroscopy along the outburst decay. We follow the spectral evolution of different pulse phase intervals and find a phase and energy-variable spectral feature, which we interpret as proton cyclotron resonant scattering of soft photon from currents circulating in a strong (10^14 G) small-scale component of the magnetic field near the neutron star surface, superimposed to the much weaker (~3 x 10^13 G) magnetic dipole field. We discuss also the implications of the pulse-resolved spectral analysis for the emission regions on the surface of the cooling magnetar.
  • A large fraction of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) displays an X-ray plateau phase within <10^{5} s from the prompt emission, proposed to be powered by the spin-down energy of a rapidly spinning newly born magnetar. In this work we use the properties of the Galactic neutron star population to constrain the GRB-magnetar scenario. We re-analyze the X-ray plateaus of all Swift GRBs with known redshift, between January 2005 and August 2014. From the derived initial magnetic field distribution for the possible magnetars left behind by the GRBs, we study the evolution and properties of a simulated GRB-magnetar population using numerical simulations of magnetic field evolution, coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of Pulsar Population Synthesis in our Galaxy. We find that if the GRB X-ray plateaus are powered by the rotational energy of a newly formed magnetar, the current observational properties of the Galactic magnetar population are not compatible with being formed within the GRB scenario (regardless of the GRB type or rate at z=0). Direct consequences would be that we should allow the existence of magnetars and "super-magnetars" having different progenitors, and that Type Ib/c SNe related to Long GRBs form systematically neutron stars with higher initial magnetic fields. We put an upper limit of <16 "super-magnetars" formed by a GRB in our Galaxy in the past Myr (at 99% c.l.). This limit is somewhat smaller than what roughly expected from Long GRB rates, although the very large uncertainties do not allow us to draw strong conclusion in this respect.
  • We present an analysis of X-ray, Ultraviolet and optical/near-IR photometric data of the transitional millisecond pulsar binary XSSJ12270-4859, obtained at different epochs after the transition to a rotation-powered radio pulsar state. The observations, while confirming the large-amplitude orbital modulation found in previous studies after the state change, also reveal an energy dependence of the amplitudes as well as variations on time scale of months. The amplitude variations are anti-correlated in the X-ray and the UV/optical bands. The average X-ray spectrum is described by a power law with \Gamma index of 1.07(8) without requiring an additional thermal component. The power law index \Gamma varies from 1.2 to 1.0 between superior and inferior conjunction of the neutron star. We interpret the observed X-ray behaviour in terms of synchrotron radiation emitted in an extended intrabinary shock, located between the pulsar and the donor star, which is eclipsed due to the companion orbital motion. The G5 type donor dominates the UV/optical and near-IR emission and is similarly found to be heated up to ? 6500K as in the disc state. The analysis of optical light curves gives a binary inclination 46 < i < 65deg and a mass ratio 0.11 < q <0.26. The donor mass is found to be 0.15 < M2 < 0.36Msun for a neutron star mass of 1.4Msun. The variations in the amplitude of the orbital modulation are interpreted in terms of small changes in the mass flow rate from the donor star. The spectral energy distribution from radio to gamma-rays is composed by multiple contributions that are different from those observed during the accretion-powered state.
  • We perform a detailed modelling of the post-outburst surface emission of the low magnetic field magnetar SGR 0418+5729. The dipolar magnetic field of this source, B=6x10^12 G estimated from its spin-down rate, is in the observed range of magnetic fields for normal pulsars. The source is further characterized by a high pulse fraction and a single-peak profile. Using synthetic temperature distribution profiles, and fully accounting for the general-relativistic effects of light deflection and gravitational redshift, we generate synthetic X-ray spectra and pulse profiles that we fit to the observations. We find that asymmetric and symmetric surface temperature distributions can reproduce equally well the observed pulse profiles and spectra of SGR 0418. Nonetheless, the modelling allows us to place constraints on the system geometry (i.e. the angles $\psi$ and $\xi$ that the rotation axis makes with the line of sight and the dipolar axis, respectively), as well as on the spot size and temperature contrast on the neutron star surface. After performing an analysis iterating between the pulse profile and spectra, as done in similar previous works, we further employed, for the first time in this context, a Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo approach to extract constraints on the model parameters from the pulse profiles and spectra, simultaneously. We find that, to reproduce the observed spectrum and flux modulation: (a) the angles must be restricted to $65\deg < \psi+\xi < 125\deg$ or $235\deg < \psi+\xi <295\deg$; (b) the temperature contrast between the poles and the equator must be at least a factor of $\sim6$, and (c) the size of the hottest region ranges between 0.2-0.7 km (including uncertainties on the source distance). Last, we interpret our findings within the context of internal and external heating models.
  • We present a long-term phase-coherent timing analysis and pulse-phase resolved spectroscopy for the two outbursts observed from the transient anomalous X-ray pulsar CXOU J164710.2-45521. For the first outburst we used 11 Chandra and XMM-Newton observations between September 2006 to August 2009, the longest baseline yet for this source. We obtain a coherent timing solution with $P=10.61065583(4)$ s, $\dot{P} = 9.72(1) \times 10^{-13}\;$s s$^{-1}$ and $\ddot{P} = -1.05(5)\times10^{-20}\; $s s$^{-2}$. Under the standard assumptions this implies a surface dipolar magnetic field of $\sim 10^{14}$ G, confirming this source as a standard-$B$ magnetar. We also study the evolution of the pulse profile (shape, intensity and pulsed fraction) as a function of time and energy. Using the phase-coherent timing solution we perform a phase-resolved spectroscopy analysis, following the spectral evolution of pulse-phase features, which hints at the physical processes taking place on the star. The results are discussed from the perspective of magneto-thermal evolution models and the untwisting magnetosphere model. Finally, we present similar analysis for the second, less intense, 2011 outburst. For the timing analysis we used Swift data together with 2 XMM-Newton and Chandra pointings. The results inferred for both outbursts are compared and briefly discussed in a more general framework.
  • Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.
  • The lack of X-ray pulsars with spin periods > 12 s raises the question of where the population of evolved high magnetic field neutron stars has gone. Unlike canonical radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars are not subject to physical limits to the emission mechanism nor observational biases against the detection of sources with longer periods. Here we show that a highly resistive layer in the innermost part of the crust of neutron stars naturally limits the spin period to a maximum value of about 10-20 s. This highly resistive layer is expected if the inner crust is amorphous and heterogeneous in nuclear charge, possibly due to the existence of a nuclear pasta phase. Our findings suggest that the maximum period of isolated X-ray pulsars can be the first observational evidence of an amorphous inner crust, which properties can be further constrained by future X-ray timing missions combined with more detailed models.
  • Paolo Soffitta, Xavier Barcons, Ronaldo Bellazzini, João Braga, Enrico Costa, George W. Fraser, Szymon Gburek, Juhani Huovelin, Giorgio Matt, Mark Pearce, Juri Poutanen, Victor Reglero, Andrea Santangelo, Rashid A. Sunyaev, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Martin Weisskopf, Roberto Aloisio, Elena Amato, Primo Attiná, Magnus Axelsson, Luca Baldini, Stefano Basso, Stefano Bianchi, Pasquale Blasi, Johan Bregeon, Alessandro Brez, Niccoló Bucciantini, Luciano Burderi, Vadim Burwitz, Piergiorgio Casella, Eugene Churazov, Marta Civitani, Stefano Covino, Rui Miguel Curado da Silva, Giancarlo Cusumano, Mauro Dadina, Flavio D'Amico, Alessandra De Rosa, Sergio Di Cosimo, Giuseppe Di Persio, Tiziana Di Salvo, Michal Dovciak, Ronald Elsner, Chris J. Eyles, Andrew C. Fabian, Sergio Fabiani, Hua Feng, Salvatore Giarrusso, René W. Goosmann, Paola Grandi, Nicolas Grosso, Gianluca Israel, Miranda Jackson, Philip Kaaret, Vladimir Karas, Michael Kuss, Dong Lai, Giovanni La Rosa, Josefin Larsson, Stefan Larsson, Luca Latronico, Antonio Maggio, Jorge Maia, Frédéric Marin, Marco Maria Massai, Teresa Mineo, Massimo Minuti, Elena Moretti, Fabio Muleri, Stephen L. O'Dell, Giovanni Pareschi, Giovanni Peres, Melissa Pesce, Pierre-Olivier Petrucci, Michele Pinchera, Delphine Porquet, Brian Ramsey, Nanda Rea, Fabio Reale, Juana Maria Rodrigo, Agata Różańska, Alda Rubini, Pawel Rudawy, Felix Ryde, Marco Salvati, Valdivino Alexandre de Santiago Júnior, Sergey Sazonov, Carmelo Sgró, Eric Silver, Gloria Spandre, Daniele Spiga, Luigi Stella, Toru Tamagawa, Francesco Tamborra, Fabrizio Tavecchio, Teresa Teixeira Dias, Matthew van Adelsberg, Kinwah Wu, Silvia Zane
    X-ray polarimetry, sometimes alone, and sometimes coupled to spectral and temporal variability measurements and to imaging, allows a wealth of physical phenomena in astrophysics to be studied. X-ray polarimetry investigates the acceleration process, for example, including those typical of magnetic reconnection in solar flares, but also emission in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars and white dwarfs. It detects scattering in asymmetric structures such as accretion disks and columns, and in the so-called molecular torus and ionization cones. In addition, it allows fundamental physics in regimes of gravity and of magnetic field intensity not accessible to experiments on the Earth to be probed. Finally, models that describe fundamental interactions (e.g. quantum gravity and the extension of the Standard Model) can be tested. We describe in this paper the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE), proposed in June 2012 to the first ESA call for a small mission with a launch in 2017 but not selected. XIPE is composed of two out of the three existing JET-X telescopes with two Gas Pixel Detectors (GPD) filled with a He-DME mixture at their focus and two additional GPDs filled with pressurized Ar-DME facing the sun. The Minimum Detectable Polarization is 14 % at 1 mCrab in 10E5 s (2-10 keV) and 0.6 % for an X10 class flare. The Half Energy Width, measured at PANTER X-ray test facility (MPE, Germany) with JET-X optics is 24 arcsec. XIPE takes advantage of a low-earth equatorial orbit with Malindi as down-link station and of a Mission Operation Center (MOC) at INPE (Brazil).
  • We present the results of simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of PSR J1819-1458. Our 94-ks XMM-Newton observation of the high magnetic field 5*10^13 G pulsar reveals a blackbody spectrum (kT~130 eV) with a broad absorption feature, possibly composed of two lines at ~1.0 and ~1.3 keV. We performed a correlation analysis of the X-ray photons with radio pulses detected in 16.2 hours of simultaneous observations at 1-2 GHz with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Parkes telescopes, respectively. Both the detected X-ray photons and radio pulses appear to be randomly distributed in time. We find tentative evidence for a correlation between the detected radio pulses and X-ray photons on timescales of less than 10 pulsar spin periods, with the probability of this occurring by chance being 0.46%. This suggests that the physical process producing the radio pulses may also heat the polar-cap.
  • Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are slowly rotating, isolated neutron stars that sporadically undergo episodes of long-term flux enhancement (outbursts) generally accompanied by the emission of short bursts of hard X-rays. This behaviour can be understood in the magnetar model, according to which these sources are mainly powered by their own magnetic energy. This is supported by the fact that the magnetic fields inferred from several observed properties of AXPs and SGRs are greater than - or at the high end of the range of - those of radio pulsars. In the peculiar case of SGR 0418+5729, a weak dipole magnetic moment is derived from its timing parameters, whereas a strong field has been proposed to reside in the stellar interior and in multipole components on the surface. Here we show that the X-ray spectrum of SGR 0418+5729 has an absorption line, the properties of which depend strongly on the star's rotational phase. This line is interpreted as a proton cyclotron feature and its energy implies a magnetic field ranging from 2E14 gauss to more than 1E15 gauss.
  • We present new Chandra X-ray observations of the transient black hole X-ray binary MAXI J1659-152 in quiescence. These observations were made more than one year after the end of the source's 2010-2011 outburst. We detect the source at a 0.5-10 keV flux of 2.8(8)e-15 erg/cm^2/s, which corresponds to a luminosity of ~1.2e31 (d/ 6 kpc)^2 erg/s. This level, while being the lowest at which the source has been detected, is within factors of ~2 of the levels seen at the end of the initial decay of the outburst and soon after a major reflare of the source. The quiescent luminosity of MAXI J1659-152, which is the shortest-orbital-period black hole X-ray binary (~2.4 hr), is lower than that of neutron-star X-ray binaries with similar periods. However, it is higher than the quiescent luminosities found for black hole X-ray binaries with orbital periods ~2-4 times longer. This could imply that a minimum quiescent luminosity may exist for black hole X-ray binaries, around orbital periods of ~5-10 hr, as predicted by binary-evolution models for the mass transfer rate. Compared to the hard state we see a clear softening of the power-law spectrum in quiescence, from an index of 1.55(4) to an index of 2.5(4). We constrain the luminosity range in which this softening starts to fractional Eddington luminosities of (0.18-6.2)e-5 (d/ 6 kpc)^2 (M/ 8 Msun), which is consistent with the ranges inferred for other sources.
  • Isolated neutron stars (NSs) show a bewildering variety of astrophysical manifestations, presumably shaped by the magnetic field strength and topology at birth. Here, using state-of-the art calculations of the coupled magnetic and thermal evolution of NSs, we compute the thermal spectra and pulse profiles expected for a variety of initial magnetic field configurations. In particular, we contrast models with purely poloidal magnetic fields to models dominated by a strong internal toroidal component. We find that, while the former displays double peaked profiles and very low pulsed fractions, in the latter, the anisotropy in the surface temperature produced by the toroidal field often results in a single pulse profile, with pulsed fractions that can exceed the 50-60% level even for perfectly isotropic local emission. We further use our theoretical results to generate simulated "observed" spectra, and show that blackbody (BB) fits result in inferred radii that can be significantly smaller than the actual NS radius, even as low as ~ 1-2 km for old NSs with strong internal toroidal fields and a high absorption column density along their line of sight. We compute the size of the inferred BB radius for a few representative magnetic field configurations, NS ages, and magnitudes of the column density. Our theoretical results are of direct relevance to the interpretation of X-ray observations of isolated NSs, as well as to the constraints on the equation of state of dense matter through radius measurements.
  • White dwarfs, neutron stars and stellar mass black holes are key laboratories to study matter in most extreme conditions of gravity and magnetic field. The unprecedented effective area of Athena+ will allow us to advance our understanding of emission mechanisms and accretion physics over a wide range of mass accretion rates, starting from lower and sub-luminous quiescent X-ray binaries up to super-Eddington ultra-luminous sources. Athena+ will measure stellar black hole spins in a much higher number of binaries than achievable now, opening the possibility to study how spin varies with black hole history. The high throughput and energy resolution of the X-IFU will be instrumental in establishing how disc wind properties depend on accretion state, in determining wind launching mechanism and in quantifying the impact of the wind induced mass loss on binary evolution and environment. Triggers and high quality optical and radio data originating from large wide field contemporaneous instruments will provide essential complementary information on jet launching mechanisms and on the physics of rotation powered pulsars, for instance. In addition, Athena+ will furnish multiple, independent measurements of the neutron star mass/radius relation in a wide range of environments and conditions so as to constrain the debated equation of state.
  • Among the many different classes of stellar objects, neutron stars provide a unique environment where we can test (at the same time) our understanding of matter with extreme density, temperature, and magnetic field. In particular, the properties of matter under the influence of magnetic fields and the role of electromagnetism in physical processes are key areas of research in physics. However, despite decades of research, our limited knowledge on the physics of strong magnetic fields is clear: we only need to note that the strongest steady magnetic field achieved in terrestrial labs is some millions of Gauss, only thousands of times stronger than a common refrigerator magnet. In this general context, I will review here the state of the art of our research on the most magnetic objects in the Universe, a small sample of neutron stars called magnetars. The study of the large high-energy emission, and the flares from these strongly magnetized (~10^{15} Gauss) neutron stars is providing crucial information about the physics involved at these extremes conditions, and favoring us with many unexpected surprises.
  • We found evidence for the super-orbital modulation in the X-ray emission of LS I +61 303 from the longest monitoring date by the RXTE. The time evolution of the modulated fraction in the orbital light curves can be well fitted with a sinusoidal function having a super-orbital period of 1667 days. However, we have found a 281.8+/-44.6 day shift between the super-orbital variability found at radio frequencies and our X-ray data. We also find a super-orbital modulation in the maximum count rate of the orbital light curves, compatible with the former results, including the shift.
  • The detection of pulsations from an X-ray binary is an unambiguous signature of the presence of a neutron star in the system. When the pulsations are missed in the radio band, their detection at other wavelengths, like X-ray or gamma-rays, requires orbital demodulation, since the length of the observations are often comparable to, or longer than the system orbital period. The detailed knowledge of the orbital parameters of binary systems plays a crucial role in the detection of the spin period of pulsars, since any uncertainty in their determination translates into a loss in the coherence of the signal during the demodulation process. In this paper, we present an analytical study aimed at unveiling how the uncertainties in the orbital parameters might impact on periodicity searches. We find a correlation between the power of the signal in the demodulated arrival time series and the uncertainty in each of the orbital parameters. This correlation is also a function of the pulsar frequency. We test our analytical results with numerical simulations, finding good agreement between them. Finally, we apply our study to the cases of LS 5039 and LS I +61 303 and consider the current level of uncertainties in the orbital parameters of these systems and their impact on a possible detection of a hosted pulsar. We also discuss the possible appearance of a sideband ambiguity in real data. The latter can occur when, due to the use of uncertain orbital parameters, the power of a putative pulsar is distributed in frequencies lying nearby the pulsar period. Even if the appearance of a sideband is already a signature of a pulsar component, it may introduce an ambiguity in the determination of its period. We present here a method to solve the sideband issue.
  • In this work, we present a leptonic, time-dependent model of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). The model seeks a solution for the lepton distribution function considering the full time-energy dependent diffusion-loss equation. The time-dependent lepton population is balanced by injection, energy losses, and escape. We include synchrotron, inverse Compton (IC, with the cosmic-microwave background as well as with IR/optical photon fields), self-synchrotron Compton (SSC), and bremsstrahlung processes, all devoid of any radiative approximations. With this model in place we focus on the Crab nebula as an example and present its time dependent evolution. Afterwards, we analyze the impact of different approximations made at the level of the diffusion-loss equation, as can be found in the literature. Whereas previous models ignored the escape term, e.g., with the diffusion-loss equation becoming advective, others approximated the losses as catastrophic, so that the equation has only time derivatives. Additional approximations are also described and computed. We show which is the impact of these approaches in the determination of the PWN evolution. In particular, we find the time-dependent deviation of the multi-wavelength spectrum and the best-fit parameters obtained with the complete and the approximate models.