• We performed the new JVLA full polarization observations at 40-48 GHz (6.3-7.5 mm) towards the nearby ($d$ $=$147$\pm$3.4 pc) Class 0 YSO IRAS 16293-2422, and compare with the previous SMA observations reported by Rao et al. (2009; 2014). We observed the quasar J1407+2827 which is weakly polarized and can be used as a leakage term calibrator for $<$9 GHz observations, to gauge the potential residual polarization leakage after calibration. We did not detect Stokes Q, U, and V intensities from the observations of J1407+2827, and constrain (3-$\sigma$) the residual polarization leakage after calibration to be $\lesssim$0.3\%. We detect linear polarization from one of the two binary components of our target source, IRAS\,16293-2422\,B. The derived polarization position angles from our observations are in excellent agreement with those detected from the previous observations of the SMA, implying that on the spatial scale we are probing ($\sim$50-1000 au), the physical mechanisms for polarizing the continuum emission do not vary significantly over the wavelength range of $\sim$0.88-7.5 mm. We hypothesize that the observed polarization position angles trace the magnetic field which converges from large scale to an approximately face-on rotating accretion flow. In this scenario, magnetic field is predominantly poloidal on $>$100 au scales, and becomes toroidal on smaller scales. However, this interpretation remains uncertain due to the high dust optical depths at the central region of IRAS\,16293-2422\,B and the uncertain temperature profile. We suggest that dust polarization at wavelengths comparable or longer than 7\,mm may still trace interstellar magnetic field. Future sensitive observations of dust polarization in the fully optically thin regime will have paramount importance for unambiguously resolving the magnetic field configuration.
  • HH 212 is a Class 0 protostellar system found to host a "hamburger"-shaped dusty disk with a rotating disk atmosphere and a collimated SiO jet at a distance of ~ 400 pc. Recently, a compact rotating outflow has been detected in SO and SO2 toward the center along the jet axis at ~ 52 au (0.13") resolution. Here we resolve the compact outflow into a small-scale wide-opening rotating outflow shell and a collimated jet, with the observations in the same S-bearing molecules at ~ 16 au (0.04") resolution. The collimated jet is aligned with the SiO jet, tracing the shock interactions in the jet. The wide-opening outflow shell is seen extending out from the inner disk around the SiO jet and has a width of ~ 100 au. It is not only expanding away from the center, but also rotating around the jet axis. The specific angular momentum of the outflow shell is ~ 40 au km/s. Simple modeling of the observed kinematics suggests that the rotating outflow shell can trace either a disk wind or disk material pushed away by an unseen wind from the inner disk or protostar. We also resolve the disk atmosphere in the same S-bearing molecules, confirming the Keplerian rotation there.
  • Episodic accretion has been proposed as a solution to the long-standing luminosity problem in star formation; however, the process remains poorly understood. We present observations of line emission from N2H+ and CO isotopologues using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the envelopes of eight Very Low Luminosity Objects (VeLLOs). In five of the sources the spatial distribution of emission from N2H+ and CO isotopologues shows a clear anti-correlation. It is proposed that this is tracing the CO snow line in the envelopes: N2H+ emission is depleted toward the center of these sources in contrast to the CO isotopologue emission which exhibits a peak. The positions of the CO snow lines traced by the N2H+ emission are located at much larger radii than those calculated using the current luminosities of the central sources. This implies that these five sources have experienced a recent accretion burst because the CO snow line would have been pushed outwards during the burst due to the increased luminosity of the central star. The N2H+ and CO isotopologue emission from DCE161, one of the other three sources, is most likely tracing a transition disk at a later evolutionary stage. Excluding DCE161, five out of seven sources (i.e., ~70%) show signatures of a recent accretion burst. This fraction is larger than that of the Class 0/I sources studied by J{\o}rgensen et al. (2015) and Frimann et al. (2016) suggesting that the interval between accretion episodes in VeLLOs is shorter than that in Class 0/I sources.
  • Analysis of all-sky Planck submillimetre observations and the IRAS 100um data has led to the detection of a population of Galactic cold clumps. The clumps can be used to study star formation and dust properties in a wide range of Galactic environments. Our aim is to measure dust spectral energy distribution (SED) variations as a function of the spatial scale and the wavelength. We examine the SEDs at large scales using IRAS, Planck, and Herschel data. At smaller scales, we compare with JCMT/SCUBA-2 850um maps with Herschel data that are filtered using the SCUBA-2 pipeline. Clumps are extracted using the Fellwalker method and their spectra are modelled as modified blackbody functions. According to IRAS and Planck data, most fields have dust colour temperatures T_C ~ 14-18K and opacity spectral index values of beta=1.5-1.9. The clumps/cores identified in SCUBA-2 maps have T~ 13K and similar beta values. There are some indications of the dust emission spectrum becoming flatter at wavelengths longer than 500um. In fits involving Planck data, the significance is limited by the uncertainty of the corrections for CO line contamination. The fits to the SPIRE data give a median beta value slightly above 1.8. In the joint SPIRE and SCUBA-2 850um fits the value decreases to beta ~1.6. Most of the observed T-beta anticorrelation can be explained by noise. The typical submillimetre opacity spectral index beta of cold clumps is found to be ~1.7. This is above the values of diffuse clouds but lower than in some previous studies of dense clumps. There is only tentative evidence of T-beta anticorrelation and beta decreasing at millimetre wavelengths.
  • Young stellar objects (YSOs) may undergo periods of active accretion (outbursts), during which the protostellar accretion rate is temporarily enhanced by a few orders of magnitude. Whether or not these accretion outburst YSOs possess similar dust/gas reservoirs to each other, and whether or not their dust/gas reservoirs are similar as quiescent YSOs, are issues not yet clarified. The aim of this work is to characterize the millimeter thermal dust emission properties of a statistically significant sample of long and short duration accretion outburst YSOs (i.e., FUors and EXors) and the spectroscopically identified candidates of accretion outbursting YSOs (i.e., FUor-like objects). We have carried out extensive Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations mostly at $\sim$225 GHz (1.33 mm) and $\sim$272 GHz (1.10 mm), from 2008 to 2017. We covered accretion outburst YSOs located at $<$1 kpc distances from the solar system. We analyze all the existing SMA data of such objects, both published and unpublished, in a coherent way to present a millimeter interferometric database of 29 objects. We obtained 21 detections at $>$3-$\sigma$ significance. Detected sources except for the two cases of V883 Ori and NGC 2071 MM3 were observed with $\sim$1$"$ angular resolution. Overall our observed targets show a systematically higher millimeter luminosity distribution than those of the $M_{*}>$0.3 $M_{\odot}$ Class II YSOs in the nearby ($\lesssim$400 pc) low-mass star-forming molecular clouds (e.g., Taurus, Lupus, Upp Scorpio, and Chameleon I). In addition, at 1 mm our observed confirmed binaries or triple-system sources are systematically fainter than the rest of the sources even though their 1 mm fluxes are broadly distributed. We may have detected $\sim$30-60\% millimeter flux variability from V2494 Cyg and V2495 Cyg, from the observations separated by $\sim$1 year.
  • The protoplanetary disk around HL Tau is so far the youngest candidate of planet formation, and it is still embedded in a protostellar envelope with a size of thousands of au. In this work, we study the gas kinematics in the envelope and its possible influence on the embedded disk. We present our new ALMA cycle 3 observational results of HL Tau in the 13CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1) emission at resolutions of 0.8" (110 au), and we compare the observed velocity pattern with models of different kinds of gas motions. Both the 13CO and C18O emission lines show a central compact component with a size of 2" (280 au), which traces the protoplanetary disk. The disk is clearly resolved and shows a Keplerian motion, from which the protostellar mass of HL Tau is estimated to be 1.8+/-0.3 M$_\odot$, assuming the inclination angle of the disk to be 47 deg from the plane of the sky. The 13CO emission shows two arc structures with sizes of 1000-2000 au and masses of 3E-3 M$_\odot$ connected to the central disk. One is blueshifted and stretches from the northeast to the northwest, and the other is redshifted and stretches from the southwest to the southeast. We find that simple kinematical models of infalling and (counter-)rotating flattened envelopes cannot fully explain the observed velocity patterns in the arc structures. The gas kinematics of the arc structures can be better explained with three-dimensional infalling or outflowing motions. Nevertheless, the observed velocity in the northwestern part of the blueshifted arc structure is ~60-70% higher than the expected free-fall velocity. We discuss two possible origins of the arc structures: (1) infalling flows externally compressed by an expanding shell driven by XZ Tau and (2) outflowing gas clumps caused by gravitational instabilities in the protoplanetary disk around HL Tau.
  • The central problem in forming a star is the angular momentum in the circumstellar disk which prevents material from falling into the central stellar core. An attractive solution to the "angular momentum problem" appears to be the ubiquitous (low-velocity and poorly-collimated) molecular outflows and (high-velocity and highly-collimated) protostellar jets accompanying the earliest phase of star formation that remove angular momentum at a range of disk radii. Previous observations suggested that outflowing material carries away the excess angular momentum via magneto-centrifugally driven winds from the surfaces of circumstellar disks down to ~ 10 AU scales, allowing the material in the outer disk to transport to the inner disk. Here we show that highly collimated protostellar jets remove the residual angular momenta at the ~ 0.05 AU scale, enabling the material in the innermost region of the disk to accrete toward the central protostar. This is supported by the rotation of the jet measured down to ~ 10 AU from the protostar in the HH 212 protostellar system. The measurement implies a jet launching radius of ~ 0.05_{-0.02}^{+0.05} AU on the disk, based on the magneto-centrifugal theory of jet production, which connects the properties of the jet measured at large distances to those at its base through energy and angular momentum conservation.
  • HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system recently found to host a "hamburger"-shaped dusty disk with a radius of ~ 60 AU, deeply embedded in an infalling-rotating flattened envelope. We have spatially resolved this envelope-disk system with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array at up to ~ 16 AU (0.04") resolution. The envelope is detected in HCO+ J=4-3 down to the dusty disk. Complex organic molecules (COMs) and doubly deuterated formaldehyde (D2CO) are detected above and below the dusty disk within ~ 40 AU of the central protostar. The COMs are methanol (CH3OH), deuterated methanol (CH2DOH), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and formamide (NH2CHO, a prebiotic precursor). We have modeled the gas kinematics in HCO+ and COMs, and found a centrifugal barrier at a radius of ~ 44 AU, within which a Keplerian rotating disk is formed. This indicates that HCO+ traces the infalling-rotating envelope down to centrifugal barrier and COMs trace the atmosphere of a Keplerian rotating disk within the centrifugal barrier. The COMs are spatially resolved for the first time, both radially and vertically, in the atmosphere of a disk in the earliest, Class 0 phase of star formation. Our spatially resolved observations of COMs favor their formation in the disk rather than a rapidly infalling (warm) inner envelope. The abundances and spatial distributions of the COMs provide strong constraints on models of their formation and transport in low-mass star formation.
  • In the earliest (so-called "Class 0") phase of sunlike (low-mass) star formation, circumstellar disks are expected to form, feeding the protostars. However, such disks are difficult to resolve spatially because of their small sizes. Moreover, there are theoretical difficulties in producing such disks in the earliest phase, due to the retarding effects of magnetic fields on the rotating, collapsing material (so-called "magnetic braking"). With the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), it becomes possible to uncover such disks and study them in detail. HH 212 is a very young protostellar system. With ALMA, we not only detect but also spatially resolve its disk in dust emission at submillimeter wavelength. The disk is nearly edge-on and has a radius of ~ 60 AU. Interestingly, it shows a prominent equatorial dark lane sandwiched between two brighter features, due to relatively low temperature and high optical depth near the disk midplane. For the first time, this dark lane is seen at submillimeter wavelength, producing a "hamburger"-shaped appearance that is reminiscent of the scattered-light image of an edge-on disk in optical and near infrared. Our observations open up an exciting possibility of directly detecting and characterizing small disks around the youngest protostars through high-resolution imaging with ALMA, which provides strong constraints on theories of disk formation.
  • We are motivated by the recent measurements of dust opacity indices beta around young stellar objects (YSOs), which suggest that efficient grain growth may have occurred earlier than the Class I stage. The present work makes use of abundant archival interferometric observations at submillimeter,millimeter, and centimeter wavelength bands to examine grain growth signatures in the dense inner regions (<1000 AU) of nine Class 0 YSOs. A systematic data analysis is performed to derive dust temperatures, optical depths, and dust opacity indices based on single-component modified black body fittings to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The fitted dust opacity indices (beta) are in a wide range of 0.3 to 2.0 when single-component SED fitting is adopted. Four out of the nine observed sources show beta lower than 1.7, the typical value of the interstellar dust. Low dust opacity index (or spectral index) values may be explained by the effect of dust grain growth, which makes beta<1.7. Alternatively, the very small observed values of beta may be interpreted by the presence of deeply embedded hot inner disks, which only significantly contribute to the observed fluxes at long wavelength bands. This possibility can be tested by the higher angular resolution imaging observations of ALMA, or more detailed sampling of SEDs in the millimeter and centimeter bands. The beta values of the remaining five sources are close to or consistent with 1.7, indicating that grain growth would start to significantly reduce the values of beta no earlier than the late-Class 0 stage for these YSOs.
  • We resolved FU Ori at 29-37 GHz using the JVLA with $\sim$0$''$.07 resolution, and performed the complementary JVLA 8-10 GHz observations, the SMA 224 GHz and 272 GHz observations, and compared with archival ALMA 346 GHz observations to obtain the SEDs. Our 8-10 GHz observations do not find evidence for the presence of thermal radio jets, and constrain the radio jet/wind flux to at least 90 times lower than the expected value from the previously reported bolometric luminosity-radio luminosity correlation. The emission at $>$29 GHz may be dominated by the two spatially unresolved sources, which are located immediately around FU Ori and its companion FU Ori S, respectively. Their deconvolved radii at 33 GHz are only a few au. The 8-346 GHz SEDs of FU Ori and FU Ori S cannot be fit by constant spectral indices (over frequency). The more sophisticated models for SEDs suggest that the $>$29 GHz emission is contributed by a combination of free-free emission from ionized gas, and thermal emission from optically thick and optically thin dust components. We hypothesize that dust in the innermost parts of the disks ($\lesssim$0.1 au) has been sublimated, and thus the disks are no more well shielded against the ionizing photons. The estimated overall gas and dust mass based on SED modeling, can be as high as a fraction of a solar mass, which is adequate for developing disk gravitational instability. Our present explanation for the observational data is that the massive inflow of gas and dust due to disk gravitational instability or interaction with a companion/intruder, was piled up at the few au scale due to the development of a deadzone with negligible ionization. The piled up material subsequently triggered the thermal and the MRI instabilities when the ionization fraction in the inner sub-au scale region exceeded a threshold value, leading to the high protostellar accretion rate.
  • We observed thirteen Planck cold clumps with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope/SCUBA-2 and with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope. The N$_2$H$^+$ distribution obtained with the Nobeyama telescope is quite similar to SCUBA-2 dust distribution. The 82 GHz HC$_3$N, 82 GHz CCS, and 94 GHz CCS emission are often distributed differently with respect to the N$_2$H$^+$ emission. The CCS emission, which is known to be abundant in starless molecular cloud cores, is often very clumpy in the observed targets. We made deep single-pointing observations in DNC, HN$^{13}$C, N$_2$D$^+$, cyclic-C$_3$H$_2$ toward nine clumps. The detection rate of N$_2$D$^+$ is 50\%. Furthermore, we observed the NH$_3$ emission toward 15 Planck cold clumps to estimate the kinetic temperature, and confirmed that most of targets are cold ($\lesssim$ 20 K). In two of the starless clumps observe, the CCS emission is distributed as it surrounds the N$_2$H$^+$ core (chemically evolved gas), which resembles the case of L1544, a prestellar core showing collapse. In addition, we detected both DNC and N$_2$D$^+$. These two clumps are most likely on the verge of star formation. We introduce the Chemical Evolution Factor (CEF) for starless cores to describe the chemical evolutionary stage, and analyze the observed Planck cold clumps.
  • We introduce a new stacking method in Keplerian disks that (1) enhances signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) of detected molecular lines and (2) that makes visible otherwise undetectable weak lines. Our technique takes advantage of the Keplerian rotational velocity pattern. It aligns spectra according to their different centroid velocities at their different positions in a disk and stacks them. After aligning, the signals are accumulated in a narrower velocity range as compared to the original line width without alignment. Moreover, originally correlated noise becomes de-correlated. Stacked and aligned spectra, thus, have a higher S/N. We apply our method to ALMA archival data of DCN (3-2), DCO+ (3-2), N2D+ (3-2), and H2CO (3_0,3-2_0,2), (3_2,2-2_2,1), and (3_2,1-2_2,0) in the protoplanetary disk around HD 163296. As a result, (1) the S/N of the originally detected DCN (3-2), DCO+ (3-2), and H2CO (3_0,3-2_0,2) and N2D+ (3-2) lines are boosted by a factor of >4-5 at their spectral peaks, implying one order of magnitude shorter integration times to reach the original S/N; and (2) the previously undetectable spectra of the H2CO (3_2,2-2_2,1) and (3_2,1-2_2,0) lines are materialized at more than 3 sigma. These dramatically enhanced S/N allow us to measure intensity distributions in all lines with high significance. The principle of our method can not only be applied to Keplerian disks but also to any systems with ordered kinematic patterns.
  • We have analyzed the HCO+ (1-0) data of the Class I-II protostar, HL Tau, obtained from the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array long baseline campaign. We generated the HCO+ image cube at an angular resolution of ~0.07 (~10 AU), and performed azimuthal averaging on the image cube to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and measure the radial profile of the HCO+ integrated intensity. Two gaps at radii of ~28 AU and ~69 AU and a central cavity are identified in the radial intensity profile. The inner HCO+ gap is coincident with the millimeter continuum gap at a radius of 32 AU. The outer HCO+ gap is located at the millimeter continuum bright ring at a radius of 69 AU and overlaps with the two millimeter continuum gaps at radii of 64 AU and 74 AU. On the contrary, the presence of the central cavity is likely due to the high optical depth of the 3 mm continuum emission and not the depletion of the HCO+ gas. We derived the HCO+ column density profile from its intensity profile. From the column density profile, the full-width-half-maximum widths of the inner and outer HCO+ gaps are both estimated to be ~14 AU, and their depths are estimated to be ~2.4 and ~5.0. These results are consistent with the expectation from the gaps opened by forming (sub-)Jovian mass planets, while placing tight constraints on the theoretical models solely incorporating the variation of dust properties and grain sizes.
  • We report new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), 0$"$.5 angular resolution observations of linearly polarized continuum emission at 6.9 mm, towards the Class 0 young stellar object (YSO) NGC1333 IRAS4A. This target source is a collapsing dense molecular core, which was resolved at short wavelengths to have hourglass shaped B-field configuration. We compare these 6.9 mm observations with previous polarization Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 0.88 mm, which have comparable angular resolution ($\sim$0$"$7). We found that at the same resolution, the observed polarization position angles at 6.9 mm are slightly deviated from those observed at 0.88 mm. Due to the lower optical depth of the emission at 6.9 mm, and the potential effect of dust grain growth, the new JVLA observations are likely probing B-field alignments in regions interior to those sampled by the previous polarization observations at higher frequencies. Our understanding can be improved by more sensitive observations, and observations for the more extended spatial scales.
  • We report Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 mm high angular resolution observations towards the four EXor type outbursting young stellar objects (YSOs) VY Tau, V1118 Ori, V1143 Ori, and NY Ori. The data mostly show low dust masses $M_{dust}$ in the associated circumstellar disks. Among the sources, NY Ori possesses a relatively massive disk with $M_{dust} \sim 9 \times 10^{-4}$ $M_{\odot}$. V1118 Ori has a marginal detection equivalent to $M_{dust} \sim 6 \times 10^{-5}$ $M_{\odot}$. V1143 Ori has a non-detection also equivalent to $M_{dust} < 6 \times 10^{-5}$ $M_{\odot}$. For the nearest source VY Tau, we get a surprising non-detection which provides a stringent upper limit $M_{dust} < 6 \times 10^{-6}$ $M_{\odot}$. We interpret our findings as suggesting that the gas and dust reservoirs that feed the short duration, repetitive optical outbursts seen in some EXors may be limited to the small scale, innermost region of their circumstellar disks. This hot dust may have escaped our detection limits. Follow-up, more sensitive millimeter observations are needed to improve our understanding of the triggering mechanisms of EXor type outbursts.
  • HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) highly collimated protostellar jet powered by a Class 0 source in Orion. We have mapped the inner 80" (~ 0.16 pc) of the jet in SiO (J=8-7) and CO (J=3-2) simultaneously at ~ 0.5 resolution with the Atacama Millimeter/Submillimeter Array at unprecedented sensitivity. The jet consists of a chain of knots, bow shocks, and sinuous structures in between. As compared to that seen in our previous observations with the Submillimeter Array, it appears to be more continuous, especially in the northern part. Some of the knots are now seen associated with small bow shocks, with their bow wings curving back to the jet axis, as seen in pulsed jet simulations. Two of them are reasonably resolved, showing kinematics consistent with sideways ejection, possibly tracing the internal working surfaces formed by a temporal variation in the jet velocity. In addition, nested shells are seen in CO around the jet axis connecting to the knots and bow shocks, driven by them. The proper motion of the jet is estimated to be ~ 115+-50 km/s, comparing to our previous observations. The jet has a small semi-periodical wiggle, with a period of ~ 93 yrs. The amplitude of the wiggle first increases with the distance from the central source and then stays roughly constant. One possible origin of the wiggle could be the kink instability in a magnetized jet.
  • HH 211 is a young Class 0 protostellar system, with a flattened envelope, a possible rotating disk, and a collimated jet. We have mapped it with the Submillimeter Array in 341.6 GHz continuum and SiO J=8-7 at ~ 0.6 resolution. The continuum traces the thermal dust emission in the flattened envelope and the possible disk. Linear polarization is detected in the continuum in the flattened envelope. The field lines implied from the polarization have different orientations, but they are not incompatible with current gravitational collapse models, which predict different orientation depending on the region/distance. Also, we might have detected for the first time polarized SiO line emission in the jet due to the Goldreich-Kylafis effect. Observations at higher sensitivity are needed to determine the field morphology in the jet.
  • Two submm/mm sources in the Barnard 1b (B1-b) core, B1-bN and B1-bS, have been studied in dust continuum, H13CO+ J=1-0, CO J=2-1, 13CO J=2-1, and C18O J=2-1. The spectral energy distributions of these sources from the mid-IR to 7 mm are characterized by very cold temperatures of T_dust < 20 K and low bolometric luminosities of 0.15-0.31 L_sun. The internal luminosities of B1-bN and B1-bS are estimated to be <0.01-0.03 L_sun and ~0.1-0.2 L_sun, respectively. Millimeter interferometric observations have shown that these sources have already formed central compact objects of ~100 AU sizes. Both B1-bN and B1-bS are driving the CO outflows with low characteristic velocities of ~2-4 km/s. The fractional abundance of H13CO+ at the positions of B1-bN and B1-bS is lower than the canonical value by a factor of 4-8. This implies that significant fraction of CO is depleted onto dust grains in dense gas surrounding these sources. The observed physical and chemical properties suggest that B1-bN and B1-bS are in the earlier evolutionary stage than most of the known Class 0 protostars. Especially, the properties of B1-bN agree with those of the first hydrostatic core predicted by the MHD simulations. The CO outflow was also detected in the mid-IR source located at ~15" from B1-bS. Since the dust continuum emission was not detected in this source, the circumstellar material surrounding this source is less than 0.01 M_sun. It is likely that the envelope of this source was dissipated by the outflow from the protostar that is located to the southwest of B1-b.
  • HH 212 is a nearby (400 pc) Class 0 protostellar system showing several components that can be compared with theoretical models of core collapse. We have mapped it in 350 GHz continuum and HCO+ J=4-3 emission with ALMA at up to ~ 0.4" resolution. A flattened envelope and a compact disk are seen in continuum around the central source, as seen before. The HCO+ kinematics shows that the flattened envelope is infalling with small rotation (i.e., spiraling) into the central source, and thus can be identified as a pseudodisk in the models of magnetized core collapse. Also, the HCO+ kinematics shows that the disk is rotating and can be rotationally supported. In addition, to account for the missing HCO+ emission at low-redshifted velocity, an extended infalling envelope is required, with its material flowing roughly parallel to the jet axis toward the pseudodisk. This is expected if it is magnetized with an hourglass B-field morphology. We have modeled the continuum and HCO+ emission of the flattened envelope and disk simultaneously. We find that a jump in density is required across the interface between the pseudodisk and the disk. A jet is seen in HCO+ extending out to ~ 500 AU away from the central source, with the peaks upstream of those seen before in SiO. The broad velocity range and high HCO+ abundance indicate that the HCO+ emission traces internal shocks in the jet.
  • The molecular outflow from IRAS 04166+2706 was mapped with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 350 GHz continuum and CO J = 3$-$2 at an angular resolution of ~1 arcsec. The field of view covers the central arc-minute, which contains the inner four pairs of knots of the molecular jet. On the channel map, conical structures are clearly present in the low velocity range (|V$-$V$_0$|$<$10 km s$^{-1}$), and the highly collimated knots appear in the Extremely High Velocity range (EHV, 50$>$|V$-$V$_0$|$>$30 km s$^{-1}$). The higher angular resolution of ~1 arcsec reveals the first blue-shifted knot (B1) that was missing in previous PdBI observation of Sant\'iago-Garc\'ia et al. (2009) at an offset of ~6 arcsec to the North-East of the central source. This identification completes the symmetric sequence of knots in both the blue- and red-shifted lobes of the outflow. The innermost knots R1 and B1 have the highest velocities within the sequence. Although the general features appear to be similar to previous CO J = 2$-$1 images in Sant\'iago-Garc\'ia et al. (2009), the emission in CO J = 3$-$2 almost always peaks further away from the central source than that of CO J = 2$-$1 in the red-shifted lobe of the channel maps. This gives rise to a gradient in the line-ratio map of CO J = 3$-$2/J = 2$-$1 from head to tail within a knot. A large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis suggests that the differences may reflect a higher gas kinetic temperature at the head. We also explore possible constraints imposed by the non-detection of SiO J = 8$-$7.
  • Two submm/mm sources in the Barnard 1b (B1-b) core, B1-bN and B1-bS, have been observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT). The 1.1 mm continuum map obtained with the SMA reveals that the two sources contain spatially compact components, suggesting that they harbor protostars. The N2D+ and N2H+ J=3-2 maps were obtained by combining the SMA and SMT data. The N2D+ map clearly shows two peaks at the continuum positions. The N2H+ map also peaks at the continuum positions, but is more dominated by the spatially extended component. The N2D+/N2H+ ratio was estimated to be ~ 0.2 at the positions of both B1-bN and B1-bS. The derived N2D+/N2H+ ratio is comparable to those of the prestellar cores in the late evolutionary stage and the class 0 protostars in the early evolutionary stage. Although B1-bN is bright in N2H+ and N2D+, this source was barely seen in H13CO+. This implies that the depletion of carbon-bearing molecules is significant in B1-bN. The chemical property suggests that B1-bN is in the earlier evolutionary stage as compared to B1-bS with the H13CO+ counterpart. The N2H+ and N2D+ lines show that the radial velocities of the two sources are different by ~ 0.9 km s-1. However, the velocity pattern along the line through B1-bN and B1-bS suggests that these two sources were not formed out of a single rotating cloud. It is likely that the B1-b core consists of two velocity components, each of which harbors a very young source.
  • The protostellar jet driven by L1448C was observed in the SiO J=8-7 and CO J=3-2 lines and 350 GHz dust continuum at ~1" resolution with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). A narrow jet from the northern source L1448C(N) was observed in the SiO and the high-velocity CO. The jet consists of a chain of emission knots with an inter-knot spacing of ~2" (500 AU) and a semi-periodic velocity variation. The innermost pair of knots, which are significant in the SiO map but barely seen in the CO, are located at ~1" (250 AU) from the central source, L1448C(N). Since the dynamical time scale for the innermost pair is only ~10 yr, SiO may have been formed in the protostellar wind through the gas-phase reaction, or been formed on the dust grain and directly released into the gas phase by means of shocks. It is found that the jet is extremely active with a mechanical luminosity of ~7 L_sun, which is comparable to the bolometric luminosity of the central source (7.5 L_sun). The mass accretion rate onto the protostar derived from the mass-loss rate is ~10^{-5} M_sun/yr. Such a high mass accretion rate suggests that the mass and the age of the central star are 0.03-0.09 M_sun and (4-12)x10^3 yr, respectively, implying that the central star is in the very early stage of protostellar evolution. The low-velocity CO emission delineates two V-shaped shells with a common apex at L1448C(N). The kinematics of these shells are reproduced by the model of a wide opening angle wind. The co-existence of the highly-collimated jets and the wide-opening angle shells can be explained by the unified X-wind model" in which highly-collimated jet components correspond to the on-axis density enhancement of the wide-opening angle wind. The CO $J$=3--2 map also revealed the second outflow driven by the southern source L1448C(S) located at ~8.3" (2000 AU) from L1448C(N).
  • HH 211 is a highly collimated jet originating from a nearby young Class 0 protostar. Here is a follow-up study of the jet with our previous observations at unprecedented resolution up to ~ 0.3" in SiO (J=8-7), CO (J=3-2), and SO (N_J=8_9-7_8). SiO, CO, and SO can all be a good tracer of the HH 211 jet, tracing the internal shocks in the jet. Although the emissions of these molecules show roughly the same morphology of the jet, there are detailed differences. In particular, the CO emission traces the jet closer to the source than the SiO and SO emissions. In addition, in the better resolved internal shocks, both the CO and SO emission are seen slightly ahead of the SiO emission. The jet is clearly seen on both sides of the source with more than one cycle of wiggle. The wiggle is reflection-symmetric about the source and can be reasonably fitted by an orbiting source jet model. The best-fit parameters suggest that the source itself could be a very low-mass protobinary with a total mass of ~ 60 M_Jup and a binary separation of ~ 4.6 AU. The abundances of SiO and SO in the gas phase are found to be highly enhanced in the jet as compared to the quiescent molecular clouds, even close to within 300 AU from the source where the dynamical time scale is <10 yrs. The abundance enhancements of these molecules are closely related to the internal shocks. The detected SiO is either the consequence of the release of Si-bearing material from dust grains or of its formation via gas chemistry in the shocks. The SO, on the other hand, seems to form via gas chemistry in the shocks.
  • HH 211 is a nearby young protostellar system with a highly collimated jet. We have mapped it in 352 GHz continuum, SiO (J=8-7), and HCO+ (J=4-3) emission at up to ~ 0.2" resolution with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The continuum source is now resolved into two sources, SMM1 and SMM2, with a separation of ~ 84 AU. SMM1 is seen at the center of the jet, probably tracing a (inner) dusty disk around the protostar driving the jet. SMM2 is seen to the southwest of SMM1 and may trace an envelope-disk around a small binary companion. A flattened envelope-disk is seen in HCO+ around SMM1 with a radius of ~ 80 AU perpendicular to the jet axis. Its velocity structure is consistent with a rotation motion and can be fitted with a Keplerian law that yields a mass of ~ 50+-15 Jupiter mass (a mass of a brown dwarf) for the protostar. Thus, the protostar could be the lowest mass source known to have a collimated jet and a rotating flattened envelope-disk. A small-scale (~ 200 AU) low-speed (~ 2 km/s) outflow is seen in HCOP+ around the jet axis extending from the envelope-disk. It seems to rotate in the same direction as the envelope-disk and may carry away part of the angular momentum from the envelope-disk. The jet is seen in SiO close to ~ 100 AU from SMM1. It is seen with a "C-shaped" bending. It has a transverse width of <~ 40 AU and a velocity of ~ 170+-60 km/s. A possible velocity gradient is seen consistently across its innermost pair of knots, with ~ 0.5 km/s at ~ 10 AU, consistent with the sense of rotation of the envelope-disk. If this gradient is an upper limit of the true rotational gradient of the jet, then the jet carries away a very small amount of angular momentum of ~ 5 AU km/s and thus must be launched from the very inner edge of the disk near the corotation radius.