• The presence of ubiquitous magnetic fields in the universe is suggested from observations of radiation and cosmic ray from galaxies or the intergalactic medium (IGM). One possible origin of cosmic magnetic fields is the magnetogenesis in the primordial universe. Such magnetic fields are called primordial magnetic fields (PMFs), and are considered to affect the evolution of matter density fluctuations and the thermal history of the IGM gas. Hence the information of PMFs is expected to be imprinted on the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) through the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect in the IGM. In this study, given an initial power spectrum of PMFs as $P(k)\propto B_{\rm 1Mpc}^2 k^{n_{B}}$, we calculate dynamical and thermal evolutions of the IGM under the influence of PMFs, and compute the resultant angular power spectrum of the Compton $y$-parameter on the sky. As a result, we find that two physical processes driven by PMFs dominantly determine the power spectrum of the Compton $y$-parameter; (i) the heating due to the ambipolar diffusion effectively works to increase the temperature and the ionization fraction, and (ii) the Lorentz force drastically enhances the density contrast just after the recombination epoch. These facts result in making the tSZ angular power spectrum induced by the PMFs more remarkable at $\ell >10^4$ than that by galaxy clusters even with $B_{\rm 1Mpc}=0.1$ nG and $n_{B}=-1.0$ because the contribution from galaxy clusters decreases with increasing $\ell$. The measurement of the tSZ angular power spectrum on high $\ell$ modes can provide the stringent constraint on PMFs.
  • We study Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data using the energy density inhomogeneity power spectrum generated by quantum fluctuations during an early epoch of inflation in the non-flat XCDM model. Here dark energy is parameterized using a fluid with a negative equation of state parameter but with the speed of fluid acoustic inhomogeneities set to the speed of light. We use this simple parameterization of dynamical dark energy, that is relatively straightforward to use in a computation, in a first attempt to gain some insight into how dark energy dynamics and non-zero spatial curvature jointly affect the CMB anisotropy data constraints. Unlike earlier analyses of non-flat models, we use a physically consistent power spectrum for energy density inhomogeneities. We find that the Planck 2015 data in conjunction with baryon acoustic oscillation measurements are reasonably well fit by a closed XCDM model in which spatial curvature contributes a percent of the current cosmological energy density budget. In this model, the measured Hubble constant and non-relativistic matter density parameter are in good agreement with values determined using most other data. Depending on parameter values, the closed XCDM model has reduced power, relative to the tilted, spatially-flat $\Lambda$CDM case, and appears to partially alleviate the low multipole CMB temperature anisotropy deficit and can help partially reconcile the CMB anisotropy and weak lensing $\sigma_8$ constraints, at the expense of somewhat worsening the fit to higher multipole CMB temperature anisotropy data. However, the closed XCDM inflation model does not seem to improve the agreement much, if at all, compared to the closed $\Lambda$CDM inflation case, even though it has one more free parameter. Our results are interesting but tentative; a more thorough analysis is needed to properly gauge their significance.
  • We study Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data using the energy density inhomogeneity power spectrum generated by quantum fluctuations during an early epoch of inflation in the non-flat $\Lambda$CDM model. Unlike earlier analyses of non-flat models, which assumed an inconsistent power-law power spectrum of energy density inhomogeneities, we find that the Planck 2015 data alone, and also in conjunction with baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, are reasonably well fit by a closed $\Lambda$CDM model in which spatial curvature contributes a few percent of the current cosmological energy density budget. In this model, the measured Hubble constant and non-relativistic matter density parameter are in good agreement with values determined using most other data. Depending on parameter values, the closed $\Lambda$CDM model has reduced power, relative to the tilted, spatially-flat $\Lambda$CDM case, and can partially alleviate the low multipole CMB temperature anisotropy deficit and can help partially reconcile the CMB anisotropy and weak lensing $\sigma_8$ constraints, at the expense of somewhat worsening the fit to higher multipole CMB temperature anisotropy data. Our results are interesting but tentative; a more thorough analysis is needed to properly gauge their significance.
  • We determine constraints on spatially-flat tilted dynamical dark energy XCDM and $\phi$CDM inflation models by analyzing Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) distance measurements. XCDM is a simple and widely used but physically inconsistent parameterization of dynamical dark energy, while the $\phi$CDM model is a physically consistent one in which a scalar field $\phi$ with an inverse power-law potential energy density powers the currently accelerating cosmological expansion. Both these models have one additional parameter compared to standard $\Lambda$CDM and both better fit the TT + lowP + lensing + BAO data than does the standard tilted flat-$\Lambda$CDM model, with $\Delta \chi^2 = -1.26\ (-1.60)$ for the XCDM ($\phi$CDM) model relative to the $\Lambda$CDM model. While this is a 1.1$\sigma$ (1.3$\sigma$) improvement over standard $\Lambda$CDM and so not significant, dynamical dark energy models cannot be ruled out. In addition, both dynamical dark energy models reduce the tension between the Planck 2015 CMB anisotropy and the weak lensing $\sigma_8$ constraints.
  • The recent GW170817 measurement favors the simplest dark energy models, such as a single scalar field. Quintessence models can be classified in two classes, freezing and thawing, depending on whether the equation of state decreases towards $-1$ or departs from it. In this paper we put observational constraints on the parameters governing the equations of state of tracking freezing, scaling freezing and thawing models using updated data, from the Planck 2015 release, joint light-curve analysis and baryonic acoustic oscillations. Because of the current tensions on the value of the Hubble parameter $H_0$, unlike previous authors, we let this parameter vary, which modifies significantly the results. Finally, we also derive constraints on neutrino masses in each of these scenarios.
  • We perform Markov chain Monte Carlo analyses to put constraints on the non-flat $\phi$CDM inflation model using Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data and baryon acoustic oscillation distance measurements. The $\phi$CDM model is a consistent dynamical dark energy model in which the currently accelerating cosmological expansion is powered by a scalar field $\phi$ slowly rolling down an inverse power-law potential energy density. We also use a physically consistent power spectrum for energy density inhomogeneities in this non-flat model. We find that, like the closed-$\Lambda$CDM and closed-XCDM models, the closed-$\phi$CDM model provides a better fit to the lower multipole region of the CMB temperature anisotropy data compared to that provided by the tilted flat-$\Lambda$CDM model. Also, like the other closed models, this model reduces the tension between the Planck and the weak lensing $\sigma_8$ constraints. However, the higher multipole region of the CMB temperature anisotropy data are better fit by the tilted flat-$\Lambda$ model than by the closed models.
  • Hiroaki Aihara, Robert Armstrong, Steven Bickerton, James Bosch, Jean Coupon, Hisanori Furusawa, Yusuke Hayashi, Hiroyuki Ikeda, Yukiko Kamata, Hiroshi Karoji, Satoshi Kawanomoto, Michitaro Koike, Yutaka Komiyama, Robert H. Lupton, Sogo Mineo, Hironao Miyatake, Satoshi Miyazaki, Tomoki Morokuma, Yoshiyuki Obuchi, Yukie Oishi, Yuki Okura, Paul A. Price, Tadafumi Takata, Manobu M. Tanaka, Masayuki Tanaka, Yoko Tanaka, Tomohisa Uchida, Fumihiro Uraguchi, Yousuke Utsumi, Shiang-Yu Wang, Yoshihiko Yamada, Hitomi Yamanoi, Naoki Yasuda, Nobuo Arimoto, Masashi Chiba, Francois Finet, Hiroki Fujimori, Seiji Fujimoto, Junko Furusawa, Tomotsugu Goto, Andy Goulding, James E. Gunn, Yuichi Harikane, Takashi Hattori, Masao Hayashi, Krzysztof G. Helminiak, Ryo Higuchi, Chiaki Hikage, Paul T.P. Ho, Bau-Ching Hsieh, Kuiyun Huang, Song Huang, Masatoshi Imanishi, Ikuru Iwata, Anton T. Jaelani, Hung-Yu Jian, Nobunari Kashikawa, Nobuhiko Katayama, Takashi Kojima, Akira Konno, Shintaro Koshida, Haruka Kusakabe, Alexie Leauthaud, C.-H. Lee, Lihwai Lin, Yen-Ting Lin, Rachel Mandelbaum, Yoshiki Matsuoka, Elinor Medezinski, Shoken Miyama, Rieko Momose, Anupreeta More, Surhud More, Shiro Mukae, Ryoma Murata, Hitoshi Murayama, Tohru Nagao, Fumiaki Nakata, Hiroko Niikura, Atsushi J. Nishizawa, Masamune Oguri, Nobuhiro Okabe, Yoshiaki Ono, Masato Onodera, Masafusa Onoue, Masami Ouchi, Tae-Soo Pyo, Takatoshi Shibuya, Kazuhiro Shimasaku, Melanie Simet, Joshua Speagle, David N. Spergel, Michael A. Strauss, Yuma Sugahara, Naoshi Sugiyama, Yasushi Suto, Nao Suzuki, Philip J. Tait, Masahiro Takada, Tsuyoshi Terai, Yoshiki Toba, Edwin L. Turner, Hisakazu Uchiyama, Keiichi Umetsu, Yuji Urata, Tomonori Usuda, Sherry Yeh, Suraphong Yuma
    The Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) is a three-layered imaging survey aimed at addressing some of the most outstanding questions in astronomy today, including the nature of dark matter and dark energy. The survey has been awarded 300 nights of observing time at the Subaru Telescope and it started in March 2014. This paper presents the first public data release of HSC-SSP. This release includes data taken in the first 1.7 years of observations (61.5 nights) and each of the Wide, Deep, and UltraDeep layers covers about 108, 26, and 4 square degrees down to depths of i~26.4, ~26.5, and ~27.0 mag, respectively (5sigma for point sources). All the layers are observed in five broad bands (grizy), and the Deep and UltraDeep layers are observed in narrow bands as well. We achieve an impressive image quality of 0.6 arcsec in the i-band in the Wide layer. We show that we achieve 1-2 per cent PSF photometry (rms) both internally and externally (against Pan-STARRS1), and ~10 mas and 40 mas internal and external astrometric accuracy, respectively. Both the calibrated images and catalogs are made available to the community through dedicated user interfaces and database servers. In addition to the pipeline products, we also provide value-added products such as photometric redshifts and a collection of public spectroscopic redshifts. Detailed descriptions of all the data can be found online. The data release website is https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/.
  • We present spectroscopic identification of 32 new quasars and luminous galaxies discovered at 5.7 < z < 6.8. This is the second in a series of papers presenting the results of the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the deep multi-band imaging data produced by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program survey. The photometric candidates were selected by a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm, and then observed with spectrographs on the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope. Combined with the sample presented in the previous paper, we have now identified 64 HSC sources over about 430 deg2, which include 33 high-z quasars, 14 high-z luminous galaxies, 2 [O III] emitters at z ~ 0.8, and 15 Galactic brown dwarfs. The new quasars have considerably lower luminosity (M1450 ~ -25 to -22 mag) than most of the previously known high-z quasars. Several of these quasars have luminous (> 10^(43) erg/s) and narrow (< 500 km/s) Ly alpha lines, and also a possible mini broad absorption line system of N V 1240 in the composite spectrum, which clearly separate them from typical quasars. On the other hand, the high-z galaxies have extremely high luminosity (M1450 ~ -24 to -22 mag) compared to other galaxies found at similar redshift. With the discovery of these new classes of objects, we are opening up new parameter spaces in the high-z Universe. Further survey observations and follow-up studies of the identified objects, including the construction of the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 6, are ongoing.
  • We present cosmological constraints on the scalar-tensor theory of gravity by analyzing the angular power spectrum data of the cosmic microwave background obtained from the Planck 2015 results together with the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) data. We find that the inclusion of the BAO data improves the constraints on the time variation of the effective gravitational constant by more than $10\%$, that is, the time variation of the effective gravitational constant between the recombination and the present epochs is constrained as $G_{\rm rec}/G_0-1 <1.9\times 10^{-3}\ (95.45\%\ {\rm C.L.})$ and $G_{\rm rec}/G_0-1 <5.5\times 10^{-3}\ (99.99 \%\ {\rm C.L.})$. We also discuss the dependence of the constraints on the choice of the prior.
  • We study the properties of dark matter halos that contain star-forming galaxies at $1.43 \le z \le 1.74$ using the FMOS-COSMOS survey. The sample consists of 516 objects with a detection of the H$\alpha$ emission line, that represent the star-forming population at this epoch having a stellar mass range of $10^{9.57}\le M_\ast/M_\odot \lesssim 10^{11.4}$ and a star formation rate range of $15\lesssim \mathrm{SFR}/(M_\odot \mathrm{yr^{-1}}) \lesssim 600$. We measure the projected two-point correlation function while carefully taking into account observational biases, and find a significant clustering amplitude at scales of $0.04$-$10~h^{-1}~\mathrm{cMpc}$, with a correlation length $r_0 = 5.21^{+0.70}_{-0.67}~h^{-1}~\mathrm{cMpc}$ and a bias $b=2.59^{+0.41}_{-0.34}$. We interpret our clustering measurement using a halo occupation distribution model. The sample galaxies appear to reside in halos with mass $M_\mathrm{h} = 4.6^{+1.1}_{-1.6}\times10^{12}~h^{-1}M_\odot$ on average that will likely become present-day halos of mass $M_\mathrm{h} (z=0) \sim2\times10^{13}~h^{-1}M_\odot$, equivalent to the typical halo mass scale of galaxy groups. We then confirm the decline of the stellar-to-halo mass ratio at $M_\mathrm{h}<10^{12}~M_\odot$, finding $M_\ast/M_\mathrm{h} \approx 5\times10^{-3}$ at $M_\mathrm{h}=10^{11.86}~M_\odot$, which is lower by a factor of 2-4 than those measured at higher masses. Finally, we use our results to illustrate the future capabilities of Subaru's Prime-Focus Spectrograph, a next-generation instrument that will provide strong constraints on the galaxy-formation scenario by obtaining precise measurements of galaxy clustering at $z>1$.
  • We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at 5.7 < z < 6.9. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the exquisite multiband imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg2 of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100 % at the brighter magnitudes (zAB < 23.5 mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-z quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-break galaxies. The remaining three objects have weak continua and very strong and narrow Ly alpha lines, which may be excited by ultraviolet light from both young stars and quasars. These results indicate that we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of z > 6 galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M1450 ~ -22 mag or zAB ~24 mag. Follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.
  • Cosmological constraints on the scalar-tensor theory of gravity by analyzing the angular power spectrum data of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained from the Planck 2015 results are presented. We consider the harmonic attractor model, in which the scalar field has a harmonic potential with curvature ($\beta$) in the Einstein frame and the theory relaxes toward the Einstein gravity with time. Analyzing the {\it TT}, {\it EE}, {\it TE} and lensing CMB data from Planck by the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we find that the present-day deviation from the Einstein gravity (${\alpha_0}^2$) is constrained as ${\alpha_0}^2<2.5\times10^{-4-4.5\beta^2}\ (95.45\% {\rm\ C.L.})$ and ${\alpha_0}^2<6.3\times10^{-4-4.5\beta^2}\ (99.99\%\ {\rm C.L.})$ for $0<\beta<0.4$. The time variation of the effective gravitational constant between the recombination and the present epochs is constrained as $G_{\rm rec}/G_0<1.0056\ (95.45\% {\rm\ C.L.})$ and $G_{\rm rec}/G_0<1.0115\ (99.99 \%{\rm\ C.L.})$. We also find that the constraints are little affected by extending to nonflat cosmological models because the diffusion damping effect revealed by Planck breaks the degeneracy of the projection effect.
  • Scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation in galaxy clusters induces polarization signals determined by the quadrupole anisotropy in the photon distribution at the location of clusters. This "remote quadrupole" derived from the measurements of the induced polarization in galaxy clusters provides an opportunity of reconstruction of local CMB temperature anisotropies. In this {\em Letter} we develop an algorithm of the reconstruction through the estimation of the underlying primordial gravitational potential, which is the origin of the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations and CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters. We found a nice reconstruction for the quadrupole and octopole components of the CMB temperature anisotropies with the assistance of the CMB induced polarization signals. The reconstruction can be an important consistency test on the puzzles of CMB anomaly, especially for the low quadrupole and axis of evil problems reported in WMAP and Planck data.
  • Cosmic strings are a type of cosmic defect formed by a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe. Individual strings would have gathered to build a network, and their dynamical motion would induce scalar--, vector-- and tensor--type perturbations. In this paper, we focus on the vector mode perturbations arising from the string network based on the one scale model and calculate the time evolution and the power spectrum of the associated magnetic fields. We show that the relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids induced by the string network can generate magnetic fields over a wide range of scales based on standard cosmology. We obtain the magnetic field spectrum before recombination as $a^2B(k,z)\sim4\times10^{-16}G\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{4.25}(k/{\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{3.5}$ Gauss on super-horizon scales, and $a^2B(k,z)\sim2.4\times10^{-17}G\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{3.5}(k/{\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{2.5}$ Gauss on sub-horizon scales in co-moving coordinates. This magnetic field grows up to the end of recombination, and has a final amplitude of approximately $B\sim10^{-17\sim -18} G\mu$ Gauss at the $k\sim1\ {\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ scale today. This field might serve as a seed for cosmological magnetic fields.
  • If vector type perturbations are present in the primordial plasma before recombination, the generation of magnetic fields is known to be inevitable through the Harrison mechanism. In the context of the standard cosmological perturbation theory, non-linear couplings of first-order scalar perturbations create second-order vector perturbations, which generate magnetic fields. Here we reinvestigate the generation of magnetic fields at second-order in cosmological perturbations on the basis of our previous study, and extend it by newly taking into account the time evolution of purely second-order vector perturbations with a newly developed second-order Boltzmann code. We confirm that the amplitude of magnetic fields from the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes is consistent with the result in our previous study. However, we find, both numerically and analytically, that the magnetic fields from the purely second-order vector perturbations partially cancel out the magnetic fields from one of the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes, in the tight coupling regime in the radiation dominated era. Therefore, the amplitude of the magnetic fields on small scales, $k \gtrsim 10~h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, is smaller than the previous estimates. The amplitude of the generated magnetic fields at cosmological recombination is about $B_{\rm rec} =5.0\times 10^{-24}~{\rm Gauss}$ on $k = 5.0 \times 10^{-1}~h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$. Finally, we discuss the reason of the discrepancies that exist in estimates of the amplitude of magnetic fields among other authors.
  • A symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe could have led to the formation of cosmic defects. Because these defects dynamically excite not only scalar and tensor type cosmological perturbations but also vector type ones, they may serve as a source of primordial magnetic fields. In this study, we calculate the time evolution and the spectrum of magnetic fields that are generated by a type of cosmic defects, called global textures, using the non-linear sigma (NLSM) model. Based on the standard cosmological perturbation theory, we show, both analytically and numerically, that a vector-mode relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids is induced by textures, which inevitably leads to the generation of magnetic fields over a wide range of scales. We find that the amplitude of the magnetic fields is given by $B\sim{10^{-9}}{((1+z)/10^3)^{-2.5}}({v}/{m_{\rm pl}})^2({k}/{\rm Mpc^{-1}})^{3.5}/{\sqrt{N}}$ Gauss in the radiation dominated era for $k\lesssim 1$ Mpc$^{-1}$, with $v$ being the vacuum expectation value of the O(N) symmetric scalar fields. By extrapolating our numerical result toward smaller scales, we expect that $B\sim {10^{-17}}((1+z)/1000)^{-1/2}({v}/{m_{\rm pl}})^2({k}/{\rm Mpc^{-1}})^{1/2}/{\sqrt{N}}$ Gauss on scales of $k\gtrsim 1$ Mpc$^{-1}$ at redshift $z\gtrsim 1100$. This might be a seed of the magnetic fields observed on large scales today.
  • Gravitational waves (GWs) are inevitably induced at second-order in cosmological perturbations through non-linear couplings with first order scalar perturbations, whose existence is well established by recent cosmological observations. So far, the evolution and the spectrum of the secondary induced GWs have been derived by taking into account the sources of GWs only from the product of first order scalar perturbations. Here we newly investigate the effects of purely second-order anisotropic stresses of photons and neutrinos on the evolution of GWs, which have been omitted in the literature. We present a full treatment of the Einstein-Boltzmann system to calculate the spectrum of GWs with anisotropic stress based on the formalism of the cosmological perturbation theory. We find that photon anisotropic stress amplifies the amplitude of GWs by about $150 %$ whereas neutrino anisotropic stress suppress that of GWs by about $30 %$ on small scales $k\gtrsim 1.0 h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ compared to the case without anisotropic stress. The second order anisotropic stress does not affect GWs with wavenumbers $k\lesssim 1.0 h{\rm Mpc}^{-1}$. The result is in marked contrast with the case at linear order, where the effect of anisotropic stress is damping in amplitude of GWs.
  • The prospects for direct measurements of inflationary gravitational waves by next generation interferometric detectors inferred from the possible detection of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background are studied. We compute the spectra of the gravitational wave background and the signal-to-noise ratios by two interferometric detectors (DECIGO and BBO) for large-field inflationary models in which the tensor-to-scalar ratio is greater than the order of 0.01. If the reheating temperature $T_{\rm RH}$ of chaotic inflation with the quadratic potential is high ($T_{\rm RH}>7.9\times10^6$ GeV for upgraded DECIGO and $T_{\rm RH}> 1.8\times 10^{6}$ GeV for BBO), it will be possible to reach the sensitivity of the gravitational background in future experiments at $3\sigma$ confidence level. The direct detection is also possible for natural inflation with the potential $V(\phi)=\Lambda^4 [1-\cos(\phi/f)]$, provided that $f>4.2 M_{\rm pl}$ (upgraded DECIGO) and $f>3.6 M_{\rm pl}$ (BBO) with $T_{\rm RH}$ higher than $10^8$ GeV. The quartic potential $V(\phi)=\lambda \phi^4/4$ with a non-minimal coupling $\xi$ between the inflaton field $\phi$ and the Ricci scalar $R$ gives rise to a detectable level of gravitational waves for $|\xi|$ smaller than the order of 0.01, irrespective of the reheating temperature.
  • We explore the observability of the neutral hydrogen (HI) and the singly-ionized isotope helium-3 ($^3$HeII) in the intergalactic medium (IGM) from the Epoch of Reionization down to the local Universe. The hyperfine transition of $^3$HeII, which is not as well known as the HI transition, has energy splitting corresponding to 8 cm. It also has a larger spontaneous decay rate than that of neutral hydrogen, whereas its primordial abundance is much smaller. Although both species are mostly ionized in the IGM, the balance between ionization and recombination in moderately high density regions renders them abundant enough to be observed. We estimate the emission signal of both hyperfine transitions from large scale filamentary structures and discuss the prospects for observing them with current and future radio telescopes. We conclude that HI in filaments is possibly observable even with current telescopes after 100 hours of observation. On the other hand, $^3$HeII is only detectable with future telescopes, such as SKA, after the same amount of time.
  • Decaying dark matter (DDM) is a candidate which can solve the discrepancies between predictions of the concordance $\Lambda$CDM model and observations at small scales such as the number counts of companion galaxies of the Milky Way and the density profile at the center of galaxies. Previous studies are limited to the cases where the decay particles are massless and/or have almost degenerate masses with that of mother particles. Here we expand the DDM models so that one can consider the DDM with arbitrary lifetime and the decay products with arbitrary masses. We calculate the time evolutions of perturbed phase-space distribution functions of decay products for the first time and study effects of DDM on the temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background and the matter power spectrum at present. From a recent observational estimate of $\sigma_{8}$, we derive constraints on the lifetime of DDM and the mass ratio between the decay products and DDM. We also discuss implications of the DDM model for the discrepancy in the measurements of $\sigma_8$ recently claimed by the Planck satellite collaboration.
  • We investigate cosmological signatures of uncorrelated isocurvature perturbations whose power spectrum is blue-tilted with spectral index 2<p<4. Such an isocurvature power spectrum can promote early formation of small-scale structure, notably dark matter halos and galaxies, and may thereby resolve the shortage of ionizing photons suggested by observations of galaxies at high redshifts (z~7-8) but that are required to reionize the universe at z~10. We mainly focus on how the formation of dark matter halos can be modified, and explore the connection between the spectral shape of CMB anisotropies and the reionization optical depth as a powerful probe of a highly blue-tilted isocurvature primordial power spectrum. We also study the consequences for 21cm line fluctuations due to neutral hydrogens in minihalos. Combination of measurements of the reionization optical depth and 21cm line fluctuations will provide complementary probes of a highly blue-tilted isocurvature power spectrum.
  • The 21 cm signal produced by non-evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs) is investigated. X-ray photons emitted by accretion of matter onto a PBH ionize and heat the intergalactic medium (IGM) gas near the PBH. Using a simple analytic model, we show that this X-ray heating can produce an observable differential 21 cm brightness temperature. The region of the observable 21 cm brightness temperature can extend to 1-10 Mpc comoving distance from a PBH depending on the PBH mass. The angular power spectrum of 21 cm fluctuations due to PBHs is also calculated. The peak position of the angular spectrum depends on PBH mass, while the amplitude is independent of PBH mass. Comparing this angular power spectrum with the angular power spectrum caused by primordial density fluctuations, it is found that both of them become comparable if $\Omega_{{\rm PBH}} = 10^{-11} (M/10^{3} M_\odot)^{-0.2}$ at $z=30$ and $10^{-12} (M/10^{3} M_\odot)^{-0.2}$ at $z=20$ for the PBH mass from $10 M_\odot $ to $10^8 M_\odot $. Finally we find that the Square Kilometer Array can detect the signal due to PBHs up to $\Omega_{\rm PBH}=10^{-5} (M/10^{3} M_\odot)^{-0.2}$ at $z=30$ and $10^{-7} (M/10^{3} M_\odot)^{-0.2}$ at $z=20$ for PBHs with mass from $10^2 M_\odot $ to $10^8 M_\odot $.
  • An optimal method to constrain the non-linearity parameter g_NL of the local-type non-Gaussianity from CMB data is proposed. Our optimal estimator for g_NL is separable and can be efficiently computed in real space. Combining the exact filtering of CMB maps with the full covariance matrix, our method allows us to extract cosmological information from observed data as much as possible and obtain a tighter constraint on g_NL than previous studies. Applying our method to the WMAP 9-year data, we obtain the constraint g_NL = (-3.3 +- 2.2) 10^5, which is a few times tighter than previous ones. We also make a forecast for PLANCK data by using the Fisher matrix analysis.
  • Recently the lower bounds of the intergalactic magnetic fields $10^{-16} \sim 10^{-20}$ Gauss are set by gamma-ray observations while it is unlikely to generate such large scale magnetic fields through astrophysical processes. It is known that large scale magnetic fields could be generated if there exist cosmological vector mode perturbations in the primordial plasma. The vector mode, however, has only a decaying solution in General Relativity if the plasma consists of perfect fluids. In order to investigate a possible mechanism of magnetogenesis in the primordial plasma, here we consider cosmological perturbations in the Einstein-Aether gravity model, in which the aether field can act as a new source of vector metric perturbations and thus of magnetic fields. We estimate the angular power spectra of temperature and B-mode polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies in this model and put a rough constraint on the aether field parameters from latest observations. We then estimate the power spectrum of associated magnetic fields around the recombination epoch within this limit. It is found that the spectrum has a characteristic peak at $k=0.1 h{\rm Mpc^{-1}}$, and at that scale the amplitude can be as large as $B\sim 10^{-22}$ Gauss where the upper bound comes from CMB temperature anisotropies. The magnetic fields with this amplitude can be seeds of large scale magnetic fields observed today if the sufficient dynamo mechanism takes place. Analytic interpretation for the power spectra is also given.
  • The angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies is a good probe to look into the primordial density fluctuations at large scales in the universe. Here we re-examine the angular power spectrum of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data, paying particular attention to the fine structures (oscillations) at $\ell=100 \sim 150$ reported by several authors. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, we confirm that the gap from the simple power law spectrum is a rare event, about 2.5--3$\sigma$, if these fine structures are generated by experimental noise and the cosmic variance. Next, in order to investigate the origin of the structures, we examine frequency and direction dependencies of the fine structures by dividing the observed QUV frequency maps into four sky regions. We find that the structures around $\ell \sim 120$ do not have significant dependences either on frequencies or directions. For the structure around $\ell \sim 140$, however, we find that the characteristic signature found in the all sky power spectrum is attributed to the anomaly only in the South East region.