• Weyl semimetals are novel topological conductors that host Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles. While the Weyl fermions in high-energy physics are strictly defined as the massless solution of the Dirac equation and uniquely fixed by Lorentz symmetry, there is no such constraint for a topological metal in general. Specifically, the Weyl quasiparticles can arise by breaking either the space-inversion ($\mathcal{I}$) or time-reversal ($\mathcal{T}$) symmetry. They can either respect Lorentz symmetry (type-I) or strongly violate it (type-II). To date, different types of Weyl fermions have been predicted to occur only in different classes of materials. In this paper, we present a significant materials breakthrough by identifying a large class of Weyl materials in the RAlX (R=Rare earth, Al, X=Ge, Si) family that can realize all different types of emergent Weyl fermions ($\mathcal{I}$-breaking, $\mathcal{T}$-breaking, type-I or type-II), depending on a suitable choice of the rare earth elements. Specifically, RAlX can be ferromagnetic, nonmagnetic or antiferromagnetic and the electronic band topology and topological nature of the Weyl fermions can be tuned. The unparalleled tunability and the large number of compounds make the RAlX family of compounds a unique Weyl semimetal class for exploring the wide-ranging topological phenomena associated with different types of emergent Weyl fermions in transport, spectroscopic and device-based experiments.
  • Engineered lattices in condensed matter physics, such as cold atom optical lattices or photonic crystals, can have fundamentally different properties from naturally-occurring electronic crystals. Here, we report a novel type of artificial quantum matter lattice. Our lattice is a multilayer heterostructure built from alternating thin films of topological and trivial insulators. Each interface within the heterostructure hosts a set of topologically-protected interface states, and by making the layers sufficiently thin, we demonstrate for the first time a hybridization of interface states across layers. In this way, our heterostructure forms an emergent atomic chain, where the interfaces act as lattice sites and the interface states act as atomic orbitals, as seen from our measurements by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). By changing the composition of the heterostructure, we can directly control hopping between lattice sites. We realize a topological and a trivial phase in our superlattice band structure. We argue that the superlattice may be characterized in a significant way by a one-dimensional topological invariant, closely related to the invariant of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. Our topological insulator heterostructure demonstrates a novel experimental platform where we can engineer band structures by directly controlling how electrons hop between lattice sites.
  • Topological semimetals (TSMs) including Weyl semimetals and nodal-line semimetals are expected to open the next frontier of condensed matter and materials science. Although the first inversion breaking Weyl semimetal was recently discovered in TaAs, its magnetic counterparts, i.e., the time-reversal breaking Weyl and nodal line semimetals, remain elusive. They are predicted to exhibit exotic properties distinct from the inversion breaking TSMs including TaAs. In this paper, we identify the magnetic topological semimetal state in the ferromagnetic half-metal compounds Co$_2$TiX (X=Si, Ge, or Sn) with Curie temperatures higher than 350 K. Our first-principles band structure calculations show that, in the absence of spin-orbit coupling, Co$_2$TiX features three topological nodal lines. The inclusion of spin-orbit coupling gives rise to Weyl nodes, whose momentum space locations can be controlled as a function of the magnetization direction. Our results not only open the door for the experimental realization of topological semimetal states in magnetic materials at room temperatures, but also suggest potential applications such as unusual anomalous Hall effects in engineered monolayers of the Co$_2$TiX compounds at high temperatures.
  • Weyl semimetals are extremely interesting. Although the first Weyl semimetal was recently discovered in TaAs, research progress is still significantly hindered due to the lack of robust and ideal materials candidates. In order to observe the many predicted exotic phenomena that arise from Weyl fermions, it is of critical importance to find robust and ideal Weyl semimetals, which have fewer Weyl nodes and more importantly whose Weyl nodes are well separated in momentum space and are located close to the chemical potential in energy. In this paper, we propose by far the most robust and ideal Weyl semimetal candidate in the inversion breaking, single crystalline compound tantalum sulfide Ta$_3$S$_2$ with new and novel properties beyond TaAs. We find that Ta$_3$S$_2$ has only 8 Weyl nodes, all of which have the same energy that is merely 10 meV below the chemical potential. Crucially, our results show that Ta$_3$S$_2$ has the largest $k$-space separation between Weyl nodes among known Weyl semimetal candidates, which is about twice larger than TaAs and twenty times larger than the predicted value in WTe$_2$. Moreover, we predict that increasing the lattice by $<4\%$ can annihilate all Weyl nodes, driving a novel topological metal-to-insulator transition from a Weyl semimetal state to a topological insulator state. We further discover that changing the lattice constant can move the Weyl nodes and the van Hove singularities with enhanced density of states to the chemical potential. Our prediction provides a critically needed robust candidate for this rapidly developing field. The well separated Weyl nodes, the topological metal-to-insulator transition and the remarkable tunabilities suggest Ta$_3$S$_2$'s potential as the ideal platform in future device-applications based on Weyl semimetals.
  • The recent discovery of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs offers the first Weyl fermion observed in nature and dramatically broadens the classification of topological phases. However, in TaAs it has proven challenging to study the rich transport phenomena arising from emergent Weyl fermions. The series Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are inversion-breaking, layered, tunable semimetals already under study as a promising platform for new electronics and recently proposed to host Type II, or strongly Lorentz-violating, Weyl fermions. Here we report the discovery of a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ at $x = 25\%$. We use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe a topological Fermi arc above the Fermi level, demonstrating a Weyl semimetal. The excellent agreement with calculation suggests that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is the first Type II Weyl semimetal. We also find that certain Weyl points are at the Fermi level, making Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ a promising platform for transport and optics experiments on Weyl semimetals.
  • We combine quasiparticle interference simulation (theory) and atomic resolution scanning tunneling spectro-microscopy (experiment) to visualize the interference patterns on a type-II Weyl semimetal Mo$_{x}$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ for the first time. Our simulation based on first-principles band topology theoretically reveals the surface electron scattering behavior. We identify the topological Fermi arc states and reveal the scattering properties of the surface states in Mo$_{0.66}$W$_{0.34}$Te$_2$. In addition, our result reveals an experimental signature of the topology via the interconnectivity of bulk and surface states, which is essential for understanding the unusual nature of this material.
  • Recently, noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd has attracted considerable research interest due to the possibility of hosting topological superconductivity. Here we report a systematic high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spin-resolved ARPES study of the normal state electronic and spin properties of BiPd. Our experimental results show the presence of a surface state at higher-binding energy with the location of Dirac point at around 700 meV below the Fermi level. The detailed photon energy, temperature-dependent and spin-resolved ARPES measurements complemented by our first principles calculations demonstrate the existence of the spin polarized surface states at high-binding energy. The absence of such spin-polarized surface states near the Fermi level negates the possibility of a topological superconducting behavior on the surface. Our direct experimental observation of spin-polarized surface states in BiPd provides critical information that will guide the future search for topological superconductivity in noncentrosymmetric materials.
  • Topological metals and semimetals (TMs) have recently drawn significant interest. These materials give rise to condensed matter realizations of many important concepts in high-energy physics, leading to wide-ranging protected properties in transport and spectroscopic experiments. The most studied TMs, i.e., Weyl and Dirac semimetals, feature quasiparticles that are direct analogues of the textbook elementary particles. Moreover, the TMs known so far can be characterized based on the dimensionality of the band crossing. While Weyl and Dirac semimetals feature zero-dimensional points, the band crossing of nodal-line semimetals forms a one-dimensional closed loop. In this paper, we identify a TM which breaks the above paradigms. Firstly, the TM features triply-degenerate band crossing in a symmorphic lattice, hence realizing emergent fermionic quasiparticles not present in quantum field theory. Secondly, the band crossing is neither 0D nor 1D. Instead, it consists of two isolated triply-degenerate nodes interconnected by multi-segments of lines with two-fold degeneracy. We present materials candidates. We further show that triplydegenerate band crossings in symmorphic crystals give rise to a Landau level spectrum distinct from the known TMs, suggesting novel magneto-transport responses. Our results open the door for realizing new topological phenomena and fermions including transport anomalies and spectroscopic responses in metallic crystals with nontrivial topology beyond the Weyl/Dirac paradigm.
  • Discovering Dirac fermions with novel properties has become an important front in condensed matter and materials sciences. Here, we report the observation of unusual Dirac fermion states in a strongly-correlated electron setting, which are uniquely distinct from those of graphene and conventional topological insulators. In strongly-correlated cerium monopnictides, we find two sets of highly anisotropic Dirac fermions that interpenetrate each other with negligible hybridization, and show a peculiar four-fold degeneracy where their Dirac nodes overlap. Despite the lack of protection by crystalline or time-reversal symmetries, this four-fold degeneracy is robust across magnetic phase transitions. Comparison of these experimental findings with our theoretical calculations suggests that the observed surface Dirac fermions arise from bulk band inversions at an odd number of high-symmetry points, which is analogous to the band topology which describes a $\mathbb{Z}_{2}$-topological phase. Our findings open up an unprecedented and long-sought-for platform for exploring novel Dirac fermion physics in a strongly-correlated semimetal.
  • It has recently been proposed that electronic band structures in crystals give rise to a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion, which violates Lorentz invariance and, consequently, is forbidden in particle physics. It was further predicted that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ may realize such a Type II Weyl fermion. One crucial challenge is that the Weyl points in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ are predicted to lie above the Fermi level. Here, by studying a simple model for a Type II Weyl cone, we clarify the importance of accessing the unoccupied band structure to demonstrate that Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ is a Weyl semimetal. Then, we use pump-probe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (pump-probe ARPES) to directly observe the unoccupied band structure of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. For the first time, we directly access states $> 0.2$ eV above the Fermi level. By comparing our results with $\textit{ab initio}$ calculations, we conclude that we directly observe the surface state containing the topological Fermi arc. Our work opens the way to studying the unoccupied band structure as well as the time-domain relaxation dynamics of Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ and related transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • We report theoretical and experimental discovery of Lorentz-violating Weyl fermion semimetal type-II state in the LaAlGe class of materials. Previously type-II Weyl state was predicted in WTe2 materials which remains unrealized in surface experiments. We show theoretically and experimentally that LaAlGe class of materials are the robust platforms for the study of type-II Weyl physics.
  • Weyl semimetals provide the realization of Weyl fermions in solid-state physics. Among all the physical phenomena that are enabled by Weyl semimetals, the chiral anomaly is the most unusual one. Here, we report signatures of the chiral anomaly in the magneto-transport measurements on the first Weyl semimetal TaAs. We show negative magnetoresistance under parallel electric and magnetic fields, that is, unlike most metals whose resistivity increases under an external magnetic field, we observe that our high mobility TaAs samples become more conductive as a magnetic field is applied along the direction of the current for certain ranges of the field strength. We present systematically detailed data and careful analyses, which allow us to exclude other possible origins of the observed negative magnetoresistance. Our transport data, corroborated by photoemission measurements, first-principles calculations and theoretical analyses, collectively demonstrate signatures of the Weyl fermion chiral anomaly in the magneto-transport of TaAs.
  • The recent discovery of the first Weyl semimetal in TaAs provides the first observation of a Weyl fermion in nature and demonstrates a novel type of anomalous surface state, the Fermi arc. Like topological insulators, the bulk topological invariants of a Weyl semimetal are uniquely fixed by the surface states of a bulk sample. Here, we present a set of distinct conditions, accessible by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), each of which demonstrates topological Fermi arcs in a surface state band structure, with minimal reliance on calculation. We apply these results to TaAs and NbP. For the first time, we rigorously demonstrate a non-zero Chern number in TaAs by counting chiral edge modes on a closed loop. We further show that it is unreasonable to directly observe Fermi arcs in NbP by ARPES within available experimental resolution and spectral linewidth. Our results are general and apply to any new material to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal.
  • Weyl semimetals have sparked intense research interest, but experimental work has been limited to the TaAs family of compounds. Recently, a number of theoretical works have predicted that compounds in the Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ series are Weyl semimetals. Such proposals are particularly exciting because Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ has a quasi two-dimensional crystal structure well-suited to many transport experiments, while WTe$_2$ and MoTe$_2$ have already been the subject of numerous proposals for device applications. However, with available ARPES techniques it is challenging to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$. According to the predictions, the Weyl points are above the Fermi level, the system approaches two critical points as a function of doping, there are many irrelevant bulk bands, the Fermi arcs are nearly degenerate with bulk bands and the bulk band gap is small. Here, we study Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ for $x = 0.07$ and 0.45 using pump-probe ARPES. The system exhibits a dramatic response to the pump laser and we successfully access states $> 0.2$eV above the Fermi level. For the first time, we observe direct, experimental signatures of Fermi arcs in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$, which agree well with theoretical calculations of the surface states. However, we caution that the interpretation of these features depends sensitively on free parameters in the surface state calculation. We comment on the prospect of conclusively demonstrating a Weyl semimetal in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$.
  • Weyl semimetals are expected to open up new horizons in physics and materials science because they provide the first realization of Weyl fermions and exhibit protected Fermi arc surface states. However, they had been found to be extremely rare in nature. Recently, a family of compounds, consisting of TaAs, TaP, NbAs and NbP was predicted as Weyl semimetal candidates. Here, we experimentally realize a Weyl semimetal state in TaP. Using photoemission spectroscopy, we directly observe the Weyl fermion cones and nodes in the bulk and the Fermi arcs on the surface. Moreover, we find that the surface states show an unexpectedly rich structure, including both topological Fermi arcs and several topologically-trivial closed contours in the vicinity of the Weyl points, which provides a promising platform to study the interplay between topological and trivial surface states on a Weyl semimetal's surface. We directly demonstrate the bulk-boundary correspondence and hence establish the topologically nontrivial nature of the Weyl semimetal state in TaP, by resolving the net number of chiral edge modes on a closed path that encloses the Weyl node. This also provides, for the first time, an experimentally practical approach to demonstrating a bulk Weyl fermion from a surface state dispersion measured in photoemission.
  • The recent discovery of the first Weyl semimetal in TaAs provides the first observation of a Weyl fermion in nature. Such a topological semimetal features a novel type of anomalous surface state, the Fermi arc, which connects a pair of Weyl nodes through the boundary of the crystal. Here, we present theoretical calculations of the quasi-particle interference (QPI) patterns that arise from the surface states including the topological Fermi arcs in the Weyl semimetals TaAs and NbP. Most importantly, we discover that the QPI exhibits termination-points that are fingerprints of the Weyl nodes in the interference pattern. Our results, for the first time, propose an interference signature of the topological Fermi arcs in TaAs, which provides important guidelines for STM measurements on this prototypical Weyl semimetal compound. The scattering channels presented here is relevant to transport phenomena on the surface of the TaAs class of Weyl semimetals. Our work is also the first systematic calculation of the quantum interferences from the Fermi arc surface states, which is in general useful for future STM studies on other Weyl semimetals.
  • Graphene and topological insulators (TI) possess two-dimensional Dirac fermions with distinct physical properties. Integrating these two Dirac materials in a single device creates interesting opportunities for exploring new physics of interacting massless Dirac fermions. Here we report on a practical route to experimental fabrication of graphene-Sb2Te3 heterostructure. The graphene-TI heterostructures are prepared by using a dry transfer of chemical-vapor-deposition grown graphene film. ARPES measurements confirm the coexistence of topological surface states of Sb2Te3 and Dirac {\pi} bands of graphene, and identify the twist angle in the graphene-TI heterostructure. The results suggest a potential tunable electronic platform in which two different Dirac low-energy states dominate the transport behavior.
  • Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics, materials science and nanotech after graphene and topological insulators. We report the first atomic scale view of the surface states of a Weyl semimetal (NbP) using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. We observe coherent quantum interference patterns that arise from the scattering of quasiparticles near point defects on the surface. The measurements reveal the surface electronic structure both below and above the chemical potential in both real and reciprocal spaces. Moreover, the interference maps uncover the scattering processes of NbP's exotic surface states. Through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations, we further discover that the scattering channels are largely restricted by the orbital and/or spin texture of the surface band. The visualization of the scattering processes can help design novel transport effects and electronics on the topological surface of a Weyl semimetal.
  • A Weyl semimetal is a new state of matter that host Weyl fermions as quasiparticle excitations. The Weyl fermions at zero energy correspond to points of bulk band degeneracy, Weyl nodes, which are separated in momentum space and are connected only through the crystal's boundary by an exotic Fermi arc surface state. We experimentally measure the spin polarization of the Fermi arcs in the first experimentally discovered Weyl semimetal TaAs. Our spin data, for the first time, reveal that the Fermi arcs' spin polarization magnitude is as large as 80% and possesses a spin texture that is completely in-plane. Moreover, we demonstrate that the chirality of the Weyl nodes in TaAs cannot be inferred by the spin texture of the Fermi arcs. The observed non-degenerate property of the Fermi arcs is important for the establishment of its exact topological nature, which reveal that spins on the arc form a novel type of 2D matter. Additionally, the nearly full spin polarization we observed (~80%) may be useful in spintronic applications.
  • Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc ~ 3 K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc ~ 2.5 K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excited topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. Our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials.
  • We present high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of trivalent CeB6 and divalent BaB6 rare-earth hexaborides. We find that the Fermi surface electronic structure of CeB6 consists of large oval-shape pockets around the X points of the Brillouin zone, while the states around the zone centre 'Gamma' point are strongly renormalized. Our first-principles calculations agree with data around the X points, but not at the 'Gamma' points, indicating areas of strong renormalization located around 'Gamma'. The Ce quasi-particle states participate in formation of hotspots at the Fermi surface, while the incoherent f states hybridize and lead to the emergence of dispersive features absent in non-f counterpart BaB6. These experimental and theoretical results provide a new understanding of rare-earth hexaboride materials.
  • The recent experimental discovery of a Weyl semimetal in TaAs provides the first observation of a Weyl fermion in nature and demonstrates a novel type of anomalous surface state band structure, consisting of Fermi arcs. So far, work has focused on Weyl semimetals with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). However, Weyl semimetals with weak SOC may allow tunable spin-splitting for device applications and may exhibit a crossover to a spinless topological phase, such as a Dirac line semimetal in the case of spinless TaAs. NbP, isostructural to TaAs, may realize the first Weyl semimetal in the limit of weak SOC. Here we study the surface states of NbP by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and we find that we $\textit{cannot}$ show Fermi arcs based on our experimental data alone. We present an $\textit{ab initio}$ calculation of the surface states of NbP and we find that the Weyl points are too close and the Fermi level is too low to show Fermi arcs either by (1) directly measuring an arc or (2) counting chiralities of edge modes on a closed path. Nonetheless, the excellent agreement between our experimental data and numerical calculations suggests that NbP is a Weyl semimetal, consistent with TaAs, and that we observe trivial surface states which evolve continuously from the topological Fermi arcs above the Fermi level. Based on these results, we propose a slightly different criterion for a Fermi arc which, unlike (1) and (2) above, does not require us to resolve Weyl points or the spin splitting of surface states. We propose that raising the Fermi level by $> 20$ meV would make it possible to observe a Fermi arc using this criterion in NbP. Our work offers insight into Weyl semimetals with weak spin-orbit coupling, as well as the crossover from the spinful topological Weyl semimetal to the spinless topological Dirac line semimetal.
  • A topological nodal-line semimetal is a new condensed matter state with one-dimensional bulk nodal lines and two-dimensional drumhead surface bands. Based on first-principles calculations and our effective k . p model, we propose the existence of topological nodal-line fermions in the ternary transition- metal chalcogenide TlTaSe2. The noncentrosymmetric structure and strong spin-orbit coupling give rise to spinful nodal-line bulk states which are protected by a mirror reflection symmetry of this compound. This is remarkably distinguished from other proposed nodal-line semimetals such as Cu3NPb(Zn) in which nodal lines exist only in the limit of vanishing spin-orbit coupling. We show that the drumhead surface states in TlTaSe2, which are associated with the topological nodal lines, exhibit an unconventional chiral spin texture and an exotic Lifshitz transition as a consequence of the linkage among multiple drumhead surface-state pockets.
  • Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics because they provide the first example of Weyl fermions, realize a new topological classification even though the system is gapless, exhibit Fermi arc surface states and demonstrate the chiral anomaly and other exotic quantum phenomena. So far, the only known Weyl semimetals are the TaAs class of materials. Here, we propose the existence of a tunable Weyl metallic state in Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$ via our first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that a 2% Mo doping is sufficient to stabilize the Weyl metal state not only at low temperatures but also at room temperatures. We show that, within a moderate doping regime, the momentum space distance between the Weyl nodes and hence the length of the Fermi arcs can be continuously tuned from zero to ~ 3% of the Brillouin zone size via changing Mo concentration, thus increasing the topological strength of the system. Our results provide an experimentally feasible route to realizing Weyl physics in the layered compound Mo$_x$W$_{1-x}$Te$_2$, where non-saturating magneto-resistance and pressure driven superconductivity have been observed.
  • The interaction between light and novel two-dimensional electronic states holds promise to realize new fundamental physics and optical devices. Here, we use pump-probe photoemission spectroscopy to study the optically-excited Dirac surface states in the bulk-insulating topological insulator Bi2Te2Se, and reveal optical properties that are in sharp contrast to those of bulk-metallic topological insulators. We observe a gigantic optical life-time exceeding 4 micro-sec for the surface states in Bi2Te2Se, whereas the life-time in most topological insulators such as Bi2Se3 has been limited to a few picoseconds. Moreover, we discover a surface photo-voltage in topological materials, a shift of the chemical potential of the Dirac surface states, as large as 100 mV. Our results demonstrate a rare platform to study charge excitation and relaxation in energy and momentum space in a two dimensional quantum system.