• Classical realism demands that system properties exist independently of whether they are measured, while noncontextuality demands that the results of measurements do not depend on what other measurements are performed in conjunction with them. The Bell-Kochen-Specker theorem states that noncontextual realism cannot reproduce the measurement statistics of a single three-level quantum system (qutrit). Noncontextual realistic models may thus be tested using a single qutrit without relying on the notion of quantum entanglement in contrast to Bell inequality tests. It is challenging to refute such models experimentally, since imperfections may introduce loopholes that enable a realist interpretation. Here we use a superconducting qutrit with deterministic, binary-outcome readouts to violate a noncontextuality inequality while addressing the detection, individual-existence and compatibility loopholes. This evidence of state-dependent contextuality also demonstrates the fitness of superconducting quantum circuits for fault-tolerant quantum computation in surface-code architectures, currently the most promising route to scalable quantum computing.
  • Quantum teleportation is a fundamental concept in quantum physics which now finds important applications at the heart of quantum technology including quantum relays, quantum repeaters and linear optics quantum computing (LOQC). Photonic implementations have largely focussed on achieving long distance teleportation due to its suitability for decoherence-free communication. Teleportation also plays a vital role in the scalability of photonic quantum computing, for which large linear optical networks will likely require an integrated architecture. Here we report the first demonstration of quantum teleportation in which all key parts - entanglement preparation, Bell-state analysis and quantum state tomography - are performed on a reconfigurable integrated photonic chip. We also show that a novel element-wise characterisation method is critical to mitigate component errors, a key technique which will become increasingly important as integrated circuits reach higher complexities necessary for quantum enhanced operation.
  • The new and rapidly growing field of circuit QED offers extremely exciting prospects for learning about and exercising intimate control over quantum systems, providing flexible, engineerable design and strong nonlinearities and interactions in systems consisting of microwave radiation fields and fixed artificial "atoms". These notes aim to provide a non-expert introduction to the field of circuit QED, to give a basic appreciation of the promise and challenges of the field, along with a number of key concepts that will hopefully be useful for the reader who is new to the field and beginning to explore the research literature. They were written as a pedagogical text designed to complement a course delivered to third-year undergraduate students. After a introductory section which discusses why studying circuit QED might be worthwhile and interesting, I introduce the basic theory tools from quantum optics and quantum information which are needed to understand the key elements of circuit QED. I also provide a brief overview of superconductivity, focussing on the concepts which are most relevant to operation in the regimes of interest in circuit QED. I then describe the three main types of superconducting qubits, and finally give a basic introduction to decoherence and mixture and how they relate to quantum behaviour in electronic circuits.
  • While universal quantum computers ideally solve problems such as factoring integers exponentially more efficiently than classical machines, the formidable challenges in building such devices motivate the demonstration of simpler, problem-specific algorithms that still promise a quantum speedup. We construct a quantum boson sampling machine (QBSM) to sample the output distribution resulting from the nonclassical interference of photons in an integrated photonic circuit, a problem thought to be exponentially hard to solve classically. Unlike universal quantum computation, boson sampling merely requires indistinguishable photons, linear state evolution, and detectors. We benchmark our QBSM with three and four photons and analyze sources of sampling inaccuracy. Our studies pave the way to larger devices that could offer the first definitive quantum-enhanced computation.
  • In a recent paper [arXiv:1301.2887] Ahrens et al. claim that our "(...) experiment on qutrits does not test Klyachko et al.'s inequality, but an inequality with extra correlations" and that the "(...) experiment cannot be considered a proper test of a noncontextuality inequality, since the same observable is measured with different setups in different contexts". We disagree with these claims. In this note we briefly re-state how our test of the non-contextuality inequality was constructed. We explain how we keep the context of measurements when switching between different terms of the tested inequality, and we argue that we did in fact test the Klyachko, Can, Binicioglu and Shumovsky inequality. In doing so, we also clarify why our experiment is indeed a proper test of noncontextual realism.
  • A key obstacle to the experimental realization of many photonic quantum-enhanced technologies is the lack of low-loss sources of single photons in pure quantum states. We demonstrate a promising solution: generation of heralded single photons in a silica photonic chip by spontaneous four-wave mixing. A heralding efficiency of 40%, corresponding to a preparation efficiency of 80% accounting for detector performance, is achieved due to efficient coupling of the low-loss source to optical fibers. A single photon purity of 0.86 is measured from the source number statistics without filtering, and confirmed by direct measurement of the joint spectral intensity. We calculate that similar high-heralded-purity output can be obtained from visible to telecom spectral regions using this approach. On-chip silica sources can have immediate application in a wide range of single-photon quantum optics applications which employ silica photonics.
  • A prime goal of quantum tomography is to provide quantitatively rigorous characterisation of quantum systems, be they states, processes or measurements, particularly for the purposes of trouble-shooting and benchmarking experiments in quantum information science. A range of techniques exist to enable the calculation of errors, such as Monte-Carlo simulations, but their quantitative value is arguably fundamentally flawed without an equally rigorous way of authenticating the quality of a reconstruction to ensure it provides a reasonable representation of the data, given the known noise sources. A key motivation for developing such a tool is to enable experimentalists to rigorously diagnose the presence of technical noise in their tomographic data. In this work, I explore the performance of the chi-squared goodness-of-fit test statistic as a measure of reconstruction quality. I show that its behaviour deviates noticeably from expectations for states lying near the boundaries of physical state space, severely undermining its usefulness as a quantitative tool precisely in the region which is of most interest in quantum information processing tasks. I suggest a simple, heuristic approach to compensate for these effects and present numerical simulations showing that this approach provides substantially improved performance.
  • Increasing the complexity of quantum photonic devices is essential for many optical information processing applications to reach a regime beyond what can be classically simulated, and integrated photonics has emerged as a leading platform for achieving this. Here, we demonstrate three-photon quantum operation of an integrated device containing three coupled interferometers, eight spatial modes and many classical and nonclassical interferences. This represents a critical advance over previous complexities and the first on-chip nonclassical interference with more than two photonic inputs. We introduce a new scheme to verify quantum behaviour, using classically characterised device elements and hierarchies of photon correlation functions. We accurately predict the device's quantum behaviour and show operation inconsistent with both classical and bi-separable quantum models. Such methods for verifying multiphoton quantum behaviour are vital for achieving increased circuit complexity. Our experiment paves the way for the next generation of integrated photonic quantum simulation and computing devices.
  • Tests of the predictions of quantum mechanics for entangled systems have provided increasing evidence against local realistic theories. However, there still remains the crucial challenge of simultaneously closing all major loopholes - the locality, freedom-of-choice, and detection loopholes - in a single experiment. An important sub-class of local realistic theories can be tested with the concept of "steering". The term steering was introduced by Schr\"odinger in 1935 for the fact that entanglement would seem to allow an experimenter to remotely steer the state of a distant system as in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) argument. Einstein called this "spooky action at a distance". EPR-Steering has recently been rigorously formulated as a quantum information task opening it up to new experimental tests. Here, we present the first loophole-free demonstration of EPR-steering by violating three-setting quadratic steering inequality, tested with polarization entangled photons shared between two distant laboratories. Our experiment demonstrates this effect while simultaneously closing all loopholes: both the locality loophole and a specific form of the freedom-of-choice loophole are closed by having a large separation of the parties and using fast quantum random number generators, and the fair-sampling loophole is closed by having high overall detection efficiency. Thereby, we exclude - for the first time loophole-free - an important class of local realistic theories considered by EPR. As well as its foundational importance, loop-hole-free steering also allows the distribution of quantum entanglement secure from an untrusted party.
  • Integration is currently the only feasible route towards scalable photonic quantum processing devices that are sufficiently complex to be genuinely useful in computing, metrology, and simulation. Embedded on-chip detection will be critical to such devices. We demonstrate an integrated photon-number resolving detector, operating in the telecom band at 1550 nm, employing an evanescently coupled design that allows it to be placed at arbitrary locations within a planar circuit. Up to 5 photons are resolved in the guided optical mode via absorption from the evanescent field into a tungsten transition-edge sensor. The detection efficiency is 7.2 \pm 0.5 %. The polarization sensitivity of the detector is also demonstrated. Detailed modeling of device designs shows a clear and feasible route to reaching high detection efficiencies.
  • Large-scale quantum-correlated networks could transform technologies ranging from communications and cryptography to computation, metrology, and simulation of novel materials. Critical to achieving such quantum enhancements is distributing high-quality entanglement between distant nodes. This is made possible in the unavoidable presence of decoherence by entanglement distillation. However, current versions of this protocol are prohibitively costly in terms of resources. We introduce a new scheme for continuous-variable entanglement distillation that requires only linear temporal and constant physical or spatial resources, both of which are exponential improvements over existing protocols. Our scheme uses a fixed module - an entanglement distillery - comprising only four quantum memories of at most 50 % storage efficiency and allowing a feasible experimental implementation. Tangible quantum advantages are obtained by using non-ideal quantum memories outside their conventional role of storage. By creating, storing and processing information in the same physical space, the scheme establishes a potentially valuable technique for designing stable, scalable protocols across different quantum technologies.
  • Quantum theory demands that, in contrast to classical physics, not all properties can be simultaneously well defined. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle is a manifestation of this fact. Another important corollary arises that there can be no joint probability distribution describing the outcomes of all possible measurements, allowing a quantum system to be classically understood. We provide the first experimental evidence that even for a single three-state system, a qutrit, no such classical model can exist that correctly describes the results of a simple set of pairwise compatible measurements. Not only is a single qutrit the simplest system in which such a contradiction is possible, but, even more importantly, the contradiction cannot result from entanglement, because such a system is indivisible, and it does not even allow the concept of entanglement between subsystems.
  • Entangled photons play a pivotal role in the distribution of quantum information in quantum networks. However, the frequency bands for optimal transmission and storage of photons are not necessarily the same. Here we experimentally demonstrate the coherent frequency conversion of photons entangled in their polarization, a widely used degree of freedom in photonic quantum information processing. We verify the successful entanglement conversion by violating a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality and fully confirm that our characterised fidelity of entanglement transfer is close to unity using both state and process tomography. Our implementation is robust and flexible, making it a practical building block for future quantum networks.
  • Bell's theorem shows that local realistic theories place strong restrictions on observable correlations between different systems, giving rise to Bell's inequality which can be violated in experiments using entangled quantum states. Bell's theorem is based on the assumptions of realism, locality, and the freedom to choose between measurement settings. In experimental tests, "loopholes" arise which allow observed violations to still be explained by local realistic theories. Violating Bell's inequality while simultaneously closing all such loopholes is one of the most significant still open challenges in fundamental physics today. In this paper, we present an experiment that violates Bell's inequality while simultaneously closing the locality loophole and addressing the freedom-of-choice loophole, also closing the latter within a reasonable set of assumptions. We also explain that the locality and freedom-of-choice loopholes can be closed only within non-determinism, i.e. in the context of stochastic local realism.
  • We experimentally demonstrate the first quantum system entangled in every degree of freedom (hyperentangled). Using pairs of photons produced in spontaneous parametric downconversion, we verify entanglement by observing a Bell-type inequality violation in each degree of freedom: polarization, spatial mode and time-energy. We also produce and characterize maximally hyperentangled states and novel states simultaneously exhibiting both quantum and classical correlations. Finally, we report the tomography of a 2x2x3x3 system (36-dimensional Hilbert space), which we believe is the first reported photonic entangled system of this size to be so characterized.
  • With growing success in experimental implementations it is critical to identify a "gold standard" for quantum information processing, a single measure of distance that can be used to compare and contrast different experiments. We enumerate a set of criteria such a distance measure must satisfy to be both experimentally and theoretically meaningful. We then assess a wide range of possible measures against these criteria, before making a recommendation as to the best measures to use in characterizing quantum information processing.
  • Optimal generalized measurements for state estimation are well understood. However, practical quantum state tomography is typically performed using a fixed set of projective measurements and the question of how to choose these measurements has been largely unexplored in the literature. In this work we develop theoretical asymptotic bounds for the average fidelity of pure qubit tomography using measurement sets whose axes correspond to vertices of Platonic solids. We also present complete simulations of maximum likelihood tomography for mixed qubit states using the Platonic solid measurements. We show that overcomplete measurement sets can be used to improve the accuracy of tomographic reconstructions.
  • We produce and holographically measure entangled qudits encoded in transverse spatial modes of single photons. With the novel use of a quantum state tomography method that only requires two-state superpositions, we achieve the most complete characterisation of entangled qutrits to date. Ideally, entangled qutrits provide better security than qubits in quantum bit-commitment: we model the sensitivity of this to mixture and show experimentally and theoretically that qutrits with even a small amount of decoherence cannot offer increased security over qubits.