• We have identified a progenitor candidate in archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images for the Type Ic SN 2017ein in NGC 3938, pinpointing the candidate's location via HST Target-of-Opportunity imaging of the SN itself. This would be the first identification of a stellar-like object as a progenitor candidate for any Type Ic supernova to date. We also present observations of SN 2017ein during the first ~49 days since explosion. We find that SN 2017ein most resembles the well-studied Type Ic SN 2007gr. We infer that SN 2017ein experienced a total visual extinction of A_V~1.0--1.9 mag, predominantly because of dust within the host galaxy. Although the distance is not well known, if this object is the progenitor, it was likely of high initial mass, ~47--48 M_sun if a single star, or ~60--80 M_sun if in a binary system. However, we also find that the progenitor candidate could be a very blue and young compact cluster, further implying a very massive (>65 M_sun) progenitor. Furthermore, the actual progenitor might not be associated with the candidate at all and could be far less massive. From the immediate stellar environment, we find possible evidence for three different populations; if the SN progenitor was a member of the youngest population, this would be consistent with an initial mass of ~57 M_sun. After it has faded, the SN should be reobserved at high spatial resolution and sensitivity, to determine whether the candidate is indeed the progenitor.
  • We examine parallaxes and distances for Galactic luminous blue variables (LBVs) in the Gaia second data release (DR2). The sample includes 9 LBVs and 14 LBV candidates. For about half of the sample, DR2 distances are either similar to commonly adopted literature values, or the DR2 values have large uncertainties. For the remaining half, reliable DR2 distances differ significantly from values in the literature, and in almost every case the Gaia DR2 distance is smaller. Two key results are that the S Doradus instability strip may not be as clearly defined as previously thought, and that there exists a population of LBVs at relatively low luminosities. LBVs seem to occupy a wide swath from the end of the main sequence at the blue edge to $\sim$8000~K at the red side, with a spread in luminosity reaching as low as log($L$/$L_{\odot}$)=4.5. The lower-luminosity group corresponds to equivalent single-star initial masses of 10-20 $M_{\odot}$, and includes objects that have been considered as confirmed LBVs. We discuss implications for LBVs including (1)~their instability and origin in binary evolution, (2)~connections to some supernova (SN) impostors such as the class of SN~2008S-like objects, and (3)~LBVs that may be progenitors of SNe with dense circumstellar material across a wide mass range. Finally, we note the surprising result that W243, thought to be in the massive young cluster Westerlund 1 (Wd1), has Gaia DR2 distance of only $\sim$1 kpc. This is much closer than previously thought based on its association with the Wd1 cluster, and we discuss some potential implications (although we postpone a detailed look at the rest of Wd1 to a later paper).
  • Double detonations in double white dwarf (WD) binaries undergoing unstable mass transfer have emerged in recent years as one of the most promising Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitor scenarios. One potential outcome of this "dynamically driven double-degenerate double-detonation" (D^6) scenario is that the companion WD survives the explosion and is flung away with a velocity equal to its > 1000 km/s pre-SN orbital velocity. We perform a search for these hypervelocity runaway WDs using Gaia's second data release. In this paper, we discuss seven candidates followed up with ground-based instruments. Three sources are likely to be some of the fastest known stars in the Milky Way and are consistent with having previously been companion WDs in pre-SN Ia systems. The combined five-parameter astrometric solutions from Gaia and radial velocities from follow-up spectra yield tentative 6D confirmation of the D^6 scenario. The past position of one of these stars is also coincident with the center of a faint, old SN remnant, further strengthening the interpretation of these candidates as hypervelocity runaways from binary systems that underwent SNe Ia.
  • Galaxy-cluster gravitational lenses can magnify background galaxies by a total factor of up to ~50. Here we report an image of an individual star at redshift z=1.49 (dubbed "MACS J1149 Lensed Star 1 (LS1)") magnified by >2000. A separate image, detected briefly 0.26 arcseconds from LS1, is likely a counterimage of the first star demagnified for multiple years by a >~3 solar-mass object in the cluster. For reasonable assumptions about the lensing system, microlensing fluctuations in the stars' light curves can yield evidence about the mass function of intracluster stars and compact objects, including binary fractions and specific stellar evolution and supernova models. Dark-matter subhalos or massive compact objects may help to account for the two images' long-term brightness ratio.
  • We present optical observations of an exceptional Type II supernova, ASASSN-15nx. Its peak luminosity at M_V = -20 mag is between those of typical core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe). The post-peak multi-band optical light curves show a remarkably long, linear decline with a steep slope of 2.5 mag / 100 d (i.e., an exponential decline in flux), through to the end of our observations at phase ~ 260d. In contrast, the light curves of the two major subclasses of SNe II, Type II-P ("plateau") and Type II-L ("linear"), always show breaks in slopes at phase ~100 d, before settling onto Co56 radioactive decay tails with a decline rate typically of about 1 mag / 100 d. The spectra of ASASSN-15nx do not exhibit the narrow emission-line features characteristic of Type IIn SNe, which can have a wide variety of light-curve shapes usually attributed to strong interactions with circumstellar medium (CSM). ASASSN-15nx also exhibits a number of peculiar spectroscopic properties, including a relatively weak H-alpha emission line that has an unusually triangularly-shaped profile with no absorption component. The physical origin giving rise to these peculiarities is unclear, while the long and linear post-peak light curve without a break likely suggests a single dominant powering mechanism. The light curve is consistent with being predominantly powered by the decay of a large amount of Ni56 (M_Ni = 1.6 +/- 0.2 M_sun), and substantial gamma-ray escape from the ejecta is needed to explain the steep light-curve slope, which is possibly due to a low-mass hydrogen envelope of the progenitor. Another possibility is strong CSM interactions mostly powering the light curve, and the CSM needs to be sculpted to produce the unique light-curve shape as well as avoid producing SN IIn-like narrow emission lines.
  • We have obtained multi-epoch observations of 31 O-type stars in the Carina Nebula using the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5-m telescope. We measure their radial velocities to 1--2 km s$^{-1}$ precision and present new or updated orbital solutions for the binary systems HD 92607, HD 93576, HDE 303312, and HDE 305536. We also compile radial velocities from the literature for 32 additional O-type and evolved massive stars in the region. The combined data set shows a mean heliocentric radial velocity of 0.6 km s$^{-1}$. We calculate a velocity dispersion of $\le9.1$ km s$^{-1}$, consistent with an unbound, substructured OB association. The Tr 14 cluster shows a marginally significant 5 km s$^{-1}$ radial velocity offset from its neighbor Tr 16, but there are otherwise no correlations between stellar position and velocity. The O-type stars in Cr 228 and the South Pillars region have a lower velocity dispersion than the region as a whole, supporting a model of distributed massive-star formation rather than migration from the central clusters. We compare our stellar velocities to the Carina Nebula's molecular gas and find that Tr 14 shows a close kinematic association with the Northern Cloud. In contrast, Tr 16 has accelerated the Southern Cloud by 10--15 km s$^{-1}$, possibly triggering further massive-star formation. The expansion of the surrounding H II region is not symmetric about the O-type stars in radial velocity space, indicating that the ionized gas is constrained by denser material on the far side.
  • We examine the fractional derivative of composite functions and present a generalization of the product and chain rules for the Caputo fractional derivative. These results are especially important for physical and biological systems that exhibit multiple spatial and temporal scales, such as porous materials and clusters of neurons, in which transport phenomena are governed by a fractional derivative of slowly varying parameters given in terms of elementary functions. Both the product and chain rules of the Caputo fractional derivative are obtained from the expansion of the fractional derivative in terms of an infinite series of integer order derivatives. The crucial step in the practical implementation of the fractional product rule relies on the exact evaluation of the repeated integral of the generalized hypergeometric function with a power-law argument. By applying the generalized Euler's integral transform, we are able to represent the repeated integral in terms of a single hypergeometric function of a higher order. We demonstrate the obtained results by the exact evaluation of the Caputo fractional derivative of hyperbolic tangent which describes dark soliton propagation in the non-linear media. We conclude that in the most general case both fractional chain and product rules result in an infinite series of the generalized hypergeometric functions.
  • We present a moderate-resolution spectrum of the peculiar Type II supernova iPTF14hls taken on day 1153 after discovery. This spectrum reveals the clear signature of shock interaction with dense circumstellar material (CSM). We suggest that this CSM interaction may be an important clue for understanding the extremely unusual photometric and spectroscopic evolution seen over the first 600 days of iPTF14hls. The late-time spectrum shows a double-peaked intermediate-width H-alpha line indicative of expansion speeds around 1000 km/s, with the double-peaked shape hinting at a disc-like geometry in the CSM. If the CSM was highly asymmetric, perhaps in a disc or torus that was ejected from the star 3-6 years prior to explosion, then the CSM interaction could have been overrun and hidden below the SN ejecta photosphere from a wide range of viewing angles. In that case, CSM interaction luminosity would have been thermalized well below the photosphere, possibly sustaining the high luminosity without exhibiting the traditional observational signatures of strong CSM interaction (narrow H-alpha emission and X-rays). Variations in density structure of the CSM could account for the multiple rebrightenings of the lightcurve. We propose that enveloped CSM interaction as seen in some recent SNe, rather than an entirely new explosion mechanism, may be adequate to explain the peculiar evolution of iPTF14hls.
  • We present photometry and spectroscopy of SN2013fs and SN2013fr in the first 100 days post-explosion. Both objects showed transient, relatively narrow H$\alpha$ emission lines characteristic of SNeIIn, but later resembled normal SNeII-P or SNeII-L, indicative of fleeting interaction with circumstellar material (CSM). SN2013fs was discovered within 8hr of explosion. Its light curve exhibits a plateau, with spectra revealing strong CSM interaction at early times. It is a less luminous version of the transitional SNIIn PTF11iqb, further demonstrating a continuum of CSM interaction intensity between SNeII-P and IIn. It requires dense CSM within 6.5$\times$10$^{14}$~cm of the progenitor, from a phase of advanced pre-SN mass loss shortly before explosion. Spectropolarimetry of SN2013fs shows little continuum polarization, but noticeable line polarization during the plateau phase. SN2013fr morphed from a SNIIn at early times to a SNII-L. After the first epoch its narrow lines probably arose from host-galaxy emission, but the bright, narrow H$\alpha$ emission at early times may be intrinsic. As for SN2013fs, this would point to a short-lived phase of strong CSM interaction if proven to be intrinsic, suggesting a continuum between SNeIIn and II-L. It is a low-velocity SNII-L, like SN2009kr but more luminous. SN2013fr also developed an IR excess at later times, due to warm CSM dust that require a more sustained phase of strong pre-SN mass loss.
  • We present photometry, spectra, and spectropolarimetry of supernova (SN) 2012ab, mostly obtained over the course of $\sim 300$ days after discovery. SN 2012ab was a Type IIn (SN IIn) event discovered near the nucleus of spiral galaxy 2MASXJ12224762+0536247. While its light curve resembles that of SN 1998S, its spectral evolution does not. We see indications of CSM interaction in the strong intermediate-width emission features, the high luminosity (peak at absolute magnitude $M=-19.5$), and the lack of broad absorption features in the spectrum. The H$\alpha$ emission undergoes a peculiar transition. At early times it shows a broad blue emission wing out to $-14{,}000$ km $\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ and a truncated red wing. Then at late times ($>$ 100$\,$days) it shows a truncated blue wing and a very broad red emission wing out to roughly $+20{,}000$ km $\mathrm{s^{-1}}$. This late-time broad red wing probably arises in the reverse shock. Spectra also show an asymmetric intermediate-width H$\alpha$ component with stronger emission on the red side at late times. The evolution of the asymmetric profiles requires a density structure in the distant CSM that is highly aspherical. Our spectropolarimetric data also suggest asphericity with a strong continuum polarization of $\sim 1-3$% and depolarization in the H$\alpha$ line, indicating asphericity in the CSM at a level comparable to that in other SNe IIn. We estimate a mass-loss rate of $\dot{M} = 0.050\, {\rm M}_{\odot}\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ for $v_{\rm pre} = 100$$\,$km$\,$$\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ extending back at least 75$\,$yr prior to the SN. The strong departure from axisymmetry in the CSM of SN 2012ab may suggest that the progenitor was an eccentric binary system undergoing eruptive mass loss.
  • Recent surveys of the Magellanic Clouds have revealed a subtype of Wolf-Rayet (WR) star with peculiar properties. WN3/O3 spectra exhibit both WR-like emission and O3 V-like absorption - but at lower luminosity than O3 V or WN stars. We examine the projected spatial distribution of WN3/O3 stars in the LMC as compared to O-type stars. Surprisingly, WN3/O3 stars are among the most isolated of all classes of massive stars; they have a distribution similar to red supergiants dominated by initial masses of 10-15 $M_{\odot}$, and are far more dispersed than classical WR stars or luminous blue variables (LBVs). Their lack of association with clusters of O-type stars suggests strongly that WN3/O3 stars are not the descendants of single massive stars (30 $M_{\odot}$ or above). Instead, they are likely products of interacting binaries at lower initial mass (10-18 $M_{\odot}$). Comparison with binary models suggests a probable origin with primaries in this mass range that were stripped of their H envelopes through non-conservative mass transfer by a low-mass secondary. We show that model spectra and positions on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for binary stripped stars are consistent with WN3/O3 stars. Monitoring radial velocities with high-resolution spectra can test for low-mass companions or runaway velocities. With lower initial mass and environments that avoid very massive stars, the WN3/O3 stars fit expectations for progenitors of Type Ib and possibly Type Ibn supernovae.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations of $^{12}$CO2$-$1 emission from circumstellar material around the massive star $\eta$~Carinae. These observations reveal new structural details about the cool equatorial torus located $\sim$4000 au from the star. The CO torus is not a complete azimuthal loop, but rather, is missing its near side, which appears to have been cleared away. The missing material matches the direction of apastron in the eccentric binary system, making it likely that $\eta$~Car's companion played an important role in disrupting portions of the torus soon after ejection. Molecular gas seen in ALMA data aligns well with the cool dust around $\eta$~Car previously observed in mid-infrared (IR) maps, whereas hot dust resides at the inner surface of the molecular torus. The CO also coincides with the spatial and velocity structure of near-IR H$_2$ emission. Together, these suggest that the CO torus seen by ALMA is actually the pinched waist of the Homunculus polar lobes, which glows brightly because it is close to the star and warmer than the poles. The near side of the torus appears to be a blowout, associated with fragmented equatorial ejecta. We discuss implications for the origin of various features northwest of the star. CO emission from the main torus implies a total gas mass in the range of 0.2-1 $M_{\odot}$ (possibly up to 5 $M_{\odot}$ or more, although with questionable assumptions). Deeper observations are needed to constrain CO emission from the cool polar lobes.
  • Observations show that luminous blue variables (LBVs) are far more dispersed than massive O-type stars, and Smith & Tombleson suggested that these large separations are inconsistent with a single-star evolution model of LBVs. Instead, they suggested that the large distances are most consistent with binary evolution scenarios. To test these suggestions, we modelled young stellar clusters and their passive dissolution, and we find that, indeed, the standard single-star evolution model is mostly inconsistent with the observed LBV environments. If LBVs are single stars, then the lifetimes inferred from their luminosity and mass are far too short to be consistent with their extreme isolation. This implies that there is either an inconsistency in the luminosity- to-mass mapping or the mass-to-age mapping. In this paper, we explore binary solutions that modify the mass-to-age mapping and are consistent with the isolation of LBVs. For the binary scenarios, our crude models suggest that LBVs are rejuvenated stars. They are either the result of mergers or they are mass gainers and received a kick when the primary star exploded. In the merger scenario, if the primary is about 19 solar masses, then the binary has enough time to wander far afield, merge and form a rejuvenated star. In the mass-gainer and kick scenario, we find that LBV isolation is consistent with a wide range of kick velocities, anywhere from 0 to ~ 105 km/s. In either scenario, binarity seems to play a major role in the isolation of LBVs.
  • The HST archive contains a large collection of images of eta Carinae, and this paper analyzes those most suitable for measuring its expanding Homunculus Nebula. Multiple intensity tracings through the Homunculus reveal the fractional increase in the overall size of the nebula; this avoids registration uncertainty, mitigates brightness fluctuations, and is independent of previous methods. Combining a 13-yr baseline of Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images in the F631N filter, with a 4-yr baseline of Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Channel (ACS/HRC) images in the F550M filter, yields an ejection date (assuming linear motion) of 1847.1 ($\pm$0.8 yr). This result improves the precision, but is in excellent agreement with the previous study by Morse et al.\ (2001) that used a shorter time baseline and a different analysis method. This more precise date is inconsistent with ejection during a periastron passage of the eccentric binary. Ejection occured well into the main plateau of the Great Eruption, and not during the brief peaks in 1843 and 1838. The age uncertainty is dominated by a real spread in ages of various knots, and by some irregular brightness fluctuations. Several knots appear to have been ejected decades before or after the mean date, implying a complicated history of mass-loss episodes outside the main bright phase of the eruption. The extended history of mass ejection may have been largely erased by the passage of a shock through clumpy ejecta, as most material was swept into a thin shell with nearly uniform apparent age.
  • We present the results of an extensive observational campaign on the nearby Type Ibn SN 2015G, including data from radio through ultraviolet wavelengths. SN 2015G was asymmetric, showing late-time nebular lines redshifted by ~1000 km/s. It shared many features with the prototypical SN In 2006jc, including extremely strong He I emssion lines and a late-time blue pseudocontinuum. The young SN 2015G showed narrow P-Cygni profiles of He I, but never in its evolution did it show any signature of hydrogen - arguing for a dense, ionized, and hydrogen-free circumstellar medium moving outward with a velocity of ~1000 km/s and created by relatively recent mass loss from the progenitor star. Ultraviolet through infrared observations show that the fading SN 2015G (which was probably discovered some 20 days post-peak) had a spectral energy distribution that was well described by a simple, single-component blackbody. Archival HST images provide upper limits on the luminosity of SN 2015G's progenitor, while nondetections of any luminous radio afterglow and optical nondetections of outbursts over the past two decades provide constraints upon its mass-loss history.
  • X-ray emission is one of the signposts of circumstellar interaction in supernovae (SNe), but until now, it has been observed only in core-collapse SNe. The level of thermal X-ray emission is a direct measure of the density of the circumstellar medium (CSM), and the absence of X-ray emission from Type Ia SNe has been interpreted as a sign of a very low density CSM. In this paper, we report late-time (500--800 days after discovery) X-ray detections of SN 2012ca in {\it Chandra} data. The presence of hydrogen in the initial spectrum led to a classification of Type Ia-CSM, ostensibly making it the first SN~Ia detected with X-rays. Our analysis of the X-ray data favors an asymmetric medium, with a high-density component which supplies the X-ray emission. The data suggest a number density $> 10^8$ cm$^{-3}$ in the higher-density medium, which is consistent with the large observed Balmer decrement if it arises from collisional excitation. This is high compared to most core-collapse SNe, but it may be consistent with densities suggested for some Type IIn or superluminous SNe. If SN 2012ca is a thermonuclear SN, the large CSM density could imply clumps in the wind, or a dense torus or disk, consistent with the single-degenerate channel. A remote possibility for a core-degenerate channel involves a white dwarf merging with the degenerate core of an asymptotic giant branch star shortly before the explosion, leading to a common envelope around the SN.
  • A search for the progenitor of SN~2010jl, an unusually luminous core-collapse supernova of Type~IIn, using pre-explosion {\it Hubble}/WFPC2 and {\it Spitzer}/IRAC images of the region, yielded upper limits on the UV and near-infrared (IR) fluxes from any candidate star. These upper limits constrain the luminosity and effective temperature of the progenitor, the mass of any preexisting dust in its surrounding circumstellar medium (CSM), and dust proximity to the star. A {\it lower} limit on the CSM dust mass is required to hide a luminous progenitor from detection by {\it Hubble}. {\it Upper} limits on the CSM dust mass and constraints on its proximity to the star are set by requiring that the absorbed and reradiated IR emission not exceed the IRAC upper limits. Using the combined extinction-IR emission constraints we present viable $M_d-R_1$ combinations, where $M_d$ and $R_1$ are the CSM dust mass and its inner radius. These depend on the CSM outer radius, dust composition and grain size, and the properties of the progenitor. The results constrain the pre-supernova evolution of the progenitor, and the nature and origin of the observed post-explosion IR emission from SN~2010jl. In particular, an $\eta$~Car-type progenitor will require at least 4~mag of visual extinction to avoid detection by the {\it Hubble}. This can be achieved with dust masses $\gtrsim 10^{-3}$~\msun\ (less than the estimated 0.2-0.5~\msun\ around $\eta$~Car) which must be located at distances of $\gtrsim 10^{16}$~cm from the star to avoid detection by {\it Spitzer}.
  • LSST Science Collaborations: Phil Marshall, Timo Anguita, Federica B. Bianco, Eric C. Bellm, Niel Brandt, Will Clarkson, Andy Connolly, Eric Gawiser, Zeljko Ivezic, Lynne Jones, Michelle Lochner, Michael B. Lund, Ashish Mahabal, David Nidever, Knut Olsen, Stephen Ridgway, Jason Rhodes, Ohad Shemmer, David Trilling, Kathy Vivas, Lucianne Walkowicz, Beth Willman, Peter Yoachim, Scott Anderson, Pierre Antilogus, Ruth Angus, Iair Arcavi, Humna Awan, Rahul Biswas, Keaton J. Bell, David Bennett, Chris Britt, Derek Buzasi, Dana I. Casetti-Dinescu, Laura Chomiuk, Chuck Claver, Kem Cook, James Davenport, Victor Debattista, Seth Digel, Zoheyr Doctor, R. E. Firth, Ryan Foley, Wen-fai Fong, Lluis Galbany, Mark Giampapa, John E. Gizis, Melissa L. Graham, Carl Grillmair, Phillipe Gris, Zoltan Haiman, Patrick Hartigan, Suzanne Hawley, Renee Hlozek, Saurabh W. Jha, C. Johns-Krull, Shashi Kanbur, Vassiliki Kalogera, Vinay Kashyap, Vishal Kasliwal, Richard Kessler, Alex Kim, Peter Kurczynski, Ofer Lahav, Michael C. Liu, Alex Malz, Raffaella Margutti, Tom Matheson, Jason D. McEwen, Peregrine McGehee, Soren Meibom, Josh Meyers, Dave Monet, Eric Neilsen, Jeffrey Newman, Matt O'Dowd, Hiranya V. Peiris, Matthew T. Penny, Christina Peters, Radoslaw Poleski, Kara Ponder, Gordon Richards, Jeonghee Rho, David Rubin, Samuel Schmidt, Robert L. Schuhmann, Avi Shporer, Colin Slater, Nathan Smith, Marcelles Soares-Santos, Keivan Stassun, Jay Strader, Michael Strauss, Rachel Street, Christopher Stubbs, Mark Sullivan, Paula Szkody, Virginia Trimble, Tony Tyson, Miguel de Val-Borro, Stefano Valenti, Robert Wagoner, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Bevin Ashley Zauderer
    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is designed to provide an unprecedented optical imaging dataset that will support investigations of our Solar System, Galaxy and Universe, across half the sky and over ten years of repeated observation. However, exactly how the LSST observations will be taken (the observing strategy or "cadence") is not yet finalized. In this dynamically-evolving community white paper, we explore how the detailed performance of the anticipated science investigations is expected to depend on small changes to the LSST observing strategy. Using realistic simulations of the LSST schedule and observation properties, we design and compute diagnostic metrics and Figures of Merit that provide quantitative evaluations of different observing strategies, analyzing their impact on a wide range of proposed science projects. This is work in progress: we are using this white paper to communicate to each other the relative merits of the observing strategy choices that could be made, in an effort to maximize the scientific value of the survey. The investigation of some science cases leads to suggestions for new strategies that could be simulated and potentially adopted. Notably, we find motivation for exploring departures from a spatially uniform annual tiling of the sky: focusing instead on different parts of the survey area in different years in a "rolling cadence" is likely to have significant benefits for a number of time domain and moving object astronomy projects. The communal assembly of a suite of quantified and homogeneously coded metrics is the vital first step towards an automated, systematic, science-based assessment of any given cadence simulation, that will enable the scheduling of the LSST to be as well-informed as possible.
  • We present optical and NIR photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2013L for the first four years post-explosion. SN 2013L was a moderately luminous (M$_{r}$ = -19.0) Type IIn supernova (SN) that showed signs of strong shock interaction with the circumstellar medium (CSM). The CSM interaction was equal to or stronger to SN 1988Z for the first 200 days and is observed at all epochs after explosion. Optical spectra revealed multi-component hydrogen lines appearing by day 33 and persisting and slowly evolving over the next few years. By day 1509 the H$\alpha$ emission was still strong and exhibiting multiple peaks, hinting that the CSM was in a disc or torus around the SN. SN 2013L is part of a growing subset of SNe IIn that shows both strong CSM interaction signatures and the underlying broad lines from the SN ejecta photosphere. The presence of a blue H$\alpha$ emission bump and a lack of a red peak does not appear to be due to dust obscuration since an identical profile is seen in Pa$\beta$. Instead this suggests a high concentration of material on the near-side of the SN or a disc inclination of roughly edge-on and hints that SN 2013L was part of a massive interactive binary system. Narrow H$\alpha$ P-Cygni lines that persist through the entirety of the observations measure a progenitor outflow speed of 80--130 km s$^{-1}$, speeds normally associated with extreme red supergiants, yellow hypergiants, or luminous blue variable winds. This progenitor scenario is also consistent with an inferred progenitor mass-loss rate of 0.3 - 8.0 $\times$ 10$^{-3}$ M$_{sun}$ yr$^{-1}$.
  • We present proper motion measurements of 37 jets and HH objects in the Carina Nebula measured in two epochs of H$\alpha$ images obtained $\sim 10$ yrs apart with HST/ACS. Transverse velocities in all but one jet are faster than $\gtrsim 25$ km s$^{-1}$, confirming that the jet-like H$\alpha$ features identified by Smith et al. (2010) trace outflowing gas. Proper motions constrain the location of the jet-driving source and provide kinematic confirmation of the intermediate-mass protostars that we identify for 20/37 jets. Jet velocities do not correlate with the estimated protostar mass and embedded driving sources do not have slower jets. Instead, transverse velocities (median $\sim 75$ km s$^{-1}$) are similar to those in jets from low-mass stars. Assuming a constant velocity since launch, we compute jet dynamical ages (median $\sim 10^4$ yr). If continuous emission from inner jets traces the duration of the most recent accretion bursts, then these episodes are sustained longer (median $\sim 700$ yr) than the typical decay time of an FU Orionis outburst. These jets can carry appreciable momentum that may be injected into the surrounding environment. The resulting outflow force, $dP/dt$, lies between that measured in low- and high-mass sources, despite the very different observational tracers used. Smooth scaling of the outflow force argues for a common physical process underlying outflows from protostars of all masses. This latest kinematic result adds to a growing body of evidence that intermediate-mass star formation proceeds like a scaled-up version of the formation of low-mass stars.
  • The massive evolved star Eta Carinae is the most luminous star in the Milky Way and has the highest steady wind mass-loss rate of any known star. Radiative transfer models of the spectrum by Hillier et al. predict that H-alpha is mostly emitted in regions of the wind at radii of 6 to 60 AU from the star (2.5 to 25 mas at 2.35 kpc). We present diffraction-limited images (FWHM ~25 mas) with Magellan adaptive optics in two epochs, showing that Eta Carinae consistently appears ~2.5 to 3 mas wider in H-alpha emission compared to the adjacent 643 nm continuum. This implies that the H-alpha line-forming region may have a characteristic emitting radius of 12 mas or ~30 AU, in very good agreement with the Hillier stellar-wind model. This provides direct confirmation that the physical wind parameters of that model are roughly correct, including the mass-loss rate of 10^-3 M_sun/yr, plus the clumping factor, and the terminal velocity. Comparison of the H-alpha images (ellipticity and PA) to the continuum images reveals no significant asymmetries at H-alpha. Hence, any asymmetry induced by a companion or by the primary's rotation do not strongly influence the global H-alpha emission in the outer wind.
  • In Paper I of this series, we showed that the ratio between stripped-envelope (SE) supernova (SN) and Type II SN rates reveals a significant SE SN deficiency in galaxies with stellar masses $\lesssim 10^{10}~{\rm M}_\odot$. Here, we test this result by splitting the volume-limited subsample of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) SN sample into low- and high-mass galaxies and comparing the relative rates of various SN types found in them. The LOSS volume-limited sample contains 180 SNe and SN impostors and is complete for SNe Ia out to 80 Mpc and core-collapse SNe out to 60 Mpc. All of these transients were recently reclassified by us in Shivvers et al. (2017). We find that the relative rates of some types of SNe differ between low- and high-mass galaxies: SNe Ib and Ic are underrepresented by a factor of ~3 in low-mass galaxies. These galaxies also contain the only examples of SN 1987A-like SNe in the sample and host about 9 times as many SN impostors. Normal SNe Ia seem to be ~30\% more common in low-mass galaxies, making these galaxies better sources for homogeneous SN Ia cosmology samples. The relative rates of SNe IIb are consistent in both low- and high-mass galaxies. The same is true for broad-line SNe Ic, although our sample includes only two such objects. The results presented here are in tension with a similar analysis from the Palomar Transient Factory, especially as regards SNe IIb.
  • We constrain the proper motions of five OB stars associated with candidate stellar wind bow shocks in the Carina Nebula using HST ACS imaging over 9--10 year baselines. These proper motions allow us to directly compare each star's motion to the orientation of its candidate bow shock. Although these stars are saturated in our imaging, we assess their motion by the shifts required to minimize residuals in their Airy rings. The results limit the direction of each star's motion to sectors less than 90 degrees wide. None of the five stars are moving away from the Carina Nebula's central clusters as runaway stars would be, confirming that a candidate bow shock is not necessarily indicative of a runaway star. Two of the five stars are moving tangentially relative to the orientation of their candidate bow shocks, both of which point at the OB cluster Trumpler 14. In these cases, the large-scale flow of the interstellar medium, powered by feedback from the cluster, appears to dominate over the motion of the star in producing the observed candidate bow shock. The remaining three stars all have some component of motion toward the central clusters, meaning that we cannot distinguish whether their candidate bow shocks are indicators of stellar motion, of the flow of ambient gas, or of density gradients in their surroundings. In addition, these stars' lack of outward motion hints that the distributed massive-star population in Carina's South Pillars region formed in place, rather than migrating out from the association's central clusters.
  • We report the discovery in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the new Herbig-Haro jet, HH 1019, located near the Tr 14 cluster in the Carina Nebula. Like other HH jets in the region, this bipolar collimated flow emerges from the head of a dark dust pillar. However, HH 1019 is unique because -- unlike all other HH jets known to date -- it is identified by a linear chain of dark, dusty knots that are seen primarily in silhouette against the background screen of the H II region. Proper motions confirm that these dark condensations move along the jet axis at high speed. [S II] emission traces a highly collimated jet that is spatially coincident with these dust knots. The high extinction in the body of the jet suggests that this outflow has lifted a large amount of dust directly from the disk, although it is possible that it has entrained dust from its surrounding protostellar envelope before exiting the dust pillar. If dust in HH 1019 originates from the circumstellar disk, this provides further evidence for a jet launched from a range of radii in the disk, including those outside the dust sublimation radius. HH 1019 may be the prototype for a new subclass of dusty HH objects seen primarily in extinction against the background screen of a bright H II region. Such jets may be common, but difficult to observe because they require the special condition of a very bright background in order to be seen in silhouette.
  • We re-examine the classifications of supernovae (SNe) presented in the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) volume-limited sample with a focus on the stripped-envelope SNe. The LOSS volume-limited sample, presented by Leaman et al. (2011) and Li et al. (2011b), was calibrated to provide meaningful measurements of SN rates in the local universe; the results presented therein continue to be used for comparisons to theoretical and modeling efforts. Many of the objects from the LOSS sample were originally classified based upon only a small subset of the data now available, however, and recent studies have both updated some subtype distinctions and improved our ability to perform robust classications, especially for stripped-envelope SNe. We re-examine the spectroscopic classifications of all events in the LOSS volume-limited sample (180 SNe and SN impostors) and update them if necessary. We discuss the populations of rare objects in our sample including broad-lined Type Ic SNe, Ca-rich SNe, SN 1987A-like events (we identify SN 2005io as SN 1987A-like here for the first time), and peculiar subtypes. The relative fractions of Type Ia SNe, Type II SNe, and stripped-envelope SNe in the local universe are not affected, but those of some subtypes are. Most significantly, after discussing the often unclear boundary between SNe Ib and Ic when only noisy spectra are available, we find a higher SN Ib fraction and a lower SN Ic fraction than calculated by Li et al. (2011b): spectroscopically normal SNe Ib occur in the local universe $1.7 \pm 0.9$ times more often than do normal SNe Ic.