• We introduce the notion of feedback computable functions from $2^\omega$ to $2^\omega$, extending feedback Turing computation in analogy with the standard notion of computability for functions from $2^\omega$ to $2^\omega$. We then show that the feedback computable functions are precisely the effectively Borel functions. With this as motivation we define the notion of a feedback computable function on a structure, independent of any coding of the structure as a real. We show that this notion is absolute, and as an example characterize those functions that are computable from a Gandy ordinal with some finite subset distinguished.
  • We investigate the relative computability of exchangeable binary relational data when presented in terms of the distribution of an invariant measure on graphs, or as a graphon in either $L^1$ or the cut distance. We establish basic computable equivalences, and show that $L^1$ representations contain fundamentally more computable information than the other representations, but that $0'$ suffices to move between computable such representations. We show that $0'$ is necessary in general, but that in the case of random-free graphons, no oracle is necessary. We also provide an example of an $L^1$-computable random-free graphon that is not weakly isomorphic to any graphon with an a.e. continuous version.
  • We show that the disintegration operator on a complete separable metric space along a projection map, restricted to measures for which there is a unique continuous disintegration, is strongly Weihrauch equivalent to the limit operator Lim. When a measure does not have a unique continuous disintegration, we may still obtain a disintegration when some basis of continuity sets has the Vitali covering property with respect to the measure; the disintegration, however, may depend on the choice of sets. We show that, when the basis is computable, the resulting disintegration is strongly Weihrauch reducible to Lim, and further exhibit a single distribution realizing this upper bound.
  • As inductive inference and machine learning methods in computer science see continued success, researchers are aiming to describe ever more complex probabilistic models and inference algorithms. It is natural to ask whether there is a universal computational procedure for probabilistic inference. We investigate the computability of conditional probability, a fundamental notion in probability theory and a cornerstone of Bayesian statistics. We show that there are computable joint distributions with noncomputable conditional distributions, ruling out the prospect of general inference algorithms, even inefficient ones. Specifically, we construct a pair of computable random variables in the unit interval such that the conditional distribution of the first variable given the second encodes the halting problem. Nevertheless, probabilistic inference is possible in many common modeling settings, and we prove several results giving broadly applicable conditions under which conditional distributions are computable. In particular, conditional distributions become computable when measurements are corrupted by independent computable noise with a sufficiently smooth bounded density.