• Improving the precision of measurements is a significant scientific challenge. The challenge is twofold: first, overcoming noise that limits the precision given a fixed amount of a resource, N, and second, improving the scaling of precision over the standard quantum limit (SQL), 1/\sqrt{N}, and ultimately reaching a Heisenberg scaling (HS), 1/N. Here we present and experimentally implement a new scheme for precision measurements. Our scheme is based on a probe in a mixed state with a large uncertainty, combined with a post-selection of an additional pure system, such that the precision of the estimated coupling strength between the probe and the system is enhanced. We performed a measurement of a single photon's Kerr non-linearity with an HS, where an ultra-small Kerr phase of around 6 *10^{-8} rad was observed with an unprecedented precision of around 3.6* 10^{-10} rad. Moreover, our scheme utilizes an imaginary weak-value, the Kerr non-linearity results in a shift of the mean photon number of the probe, and hence, the scheme is robust to noise originating from the self-phase modulation.
  • State-of-the-art methods for sensing weak AC fields are only efficient in the low frequency domain (< 10 MHz). The inefficiency of sensing high frequency signals is due to the lack of ability to use dynamical decoupling. In this paper we show that dynamical decoupling can be incorporated into high frequency sensing schemes and by this we demonstrate that the high sensitivity achieved for low frequency can be extended to the whole spectrum. While our scheme is general and suitable to a variety of atomic and solid-state systems, we experimentally demonstrate it with the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. For a diamond with natural abundance of $^{13}$C we achieve coherence times up to 1.43 ms resulting in a smallest detectable magnetic field strength of 4 nT at 1.6 GHz. Attributed to the inherent nature of our scheme, we observe an additional increase in coherence time due to the signal itself.
  • Resilience to noise and to decoherence processes is an important ingredient for the implementation of quantum information processing, and quantum technologies. To this end, techniques such as pulsed and continuous dynamical decoupling have been proposed to reduce noise effects. In this paper, we suggest a new approach to implementing continuous dynamical decoupling techniques, that uses an extra control parameter; namely, the ability to shape the time dependence of the detuning. This approach reduces the complexity of the experimental setup, such that we are only left with noise originating from the frequency of the driving field, which is much more robust than the amplitude (Rabi frequency) noise. As an example, we show that our technique can be utilized for improved sensing.
  • Bit commitment and coin flipping occupy a unique place in the device-independent landscape, as the only device-independent protocols thus far suggested for these tasks are reliant on tripartite GHZ correlations. Indeed, we know of no other bipartite tasks, which admit a device-independent formulation, but which are not known to be implementable using only bipartite nonlocality. Another interesting feature of these protocols is that the pseudo-telepathic nature of GHZ correlations -- in contrast to the generally statistical character of nonlocal correlations, such as those arising in the violation of the CHSH inequality -- is essential to their formulation and analysis. In this work, we present a device-independent bit commitment protocol based on CHSH testing, which achieves the same security as the optimal GHZ-based protocol. The protocol is analyzed in the most general settings, where the devices are used repeatedly and may have long-term quantum memory. We also recast the protocol in a post-quantum setting where both honest and dishonest parties are restricted only by the impossibility of signaling, and find that overall the supra-quantum structure allows for greater security.