• Detecting the spectroscopic signatures of Dirac-like quasiparticles in emergent topological materials is crucial for searching their potential applications. Magnetometry is a powerful tool for fathoming electrons in solids, yet its ability for discerning Dirac-like quasiparticles has not been recognized. Adopting the probes of magnetic torque and parallel magnetization for the archetype Weyl semimetal TaAs in strong magnetic field, we observed a quasi-linear field dependent effective transverse magnetization and a strongly enhanced parallel magnetization when the system is in the quantum limit. Distinct from the saturating magnetic responses for massive carriers, the non-saturating signals of TaAs in strong field is consistent with our newly developed magnetization calculation for a Weyl fermion system in an arbitrary angle. Our results for the first time establish a thermodynamic criterion for detecting the unique magnetic response of 3D massless Weyl fermions in the quantum limit.
  • In pulsed magnetic fields up to 65T and at temperatures below the N\'eel transition, our magnetization and magnetostriction measurements reveal a field-induced metamagnetic-like transition that is suggestive of an antiferromagnetic to polarized paramagnetic or ferrimagnetic ordering. Our data also suggests a change in the nature of this metamagnetic-like transition from second- to first-order-like near a tricritical point at T_{tc} ~145K and H_{c}~52T. At high fields for H>H_{c} we found a decreased magnetic moment roughly half of the moment reported in low field measurements. We propose that \mathit{f-p} hybridization effects and magnetoelastic interactions drive the decreased moment, lack of saturation at high fields, and the decreased phase boundary.
  • We report measurements of the specific heat and magnetization of single crystal samples of the spin-1/2 kagome compound ZnCu$_{3}$(OH)$_{6}$Cl$_{2}$ (herbertsmithite), a promising quantum spin-liquid candidate, in high magnetic fields and at low temperatures. The magnetization was measured up to $\mu_{0}H$ = 55 T at $T$ = 0.4 K, showing a saturation of the weakly interacting impurity moments in fields above $\sim10$ T. The specific heat was measured down to $T < 0.4$ K in magnetic fields up to 18 T, revealing $T$-linear and $T$-squared contributions. The $T$-linear contribution is surprisingly large and indicates the presence of gapless excitations in large applied fields. These results further highlight the unusual excitation spectrum of the spin liquid ground state of herbertsmithite.
  • We survey recent experimental results including quantum oscillations and complementary measurements probing the electronic structure of underdoped cuprates, and theoretical proposals to explain them. We discuss quantum oscillations measured at high magnetic fields in the underdoped cuprates that reveal a small Fermi surface section comprising quasiparticles that obey Fermi-Dirac statistics, unaccompanied by other states of comparable thermodynamic mass at the Fermi level. The location of the observed Fermi surface section at the nodes is indicated by a body of evidence including the collapse in Fermi velocity measured by quantum oscillations, which is found to be associated with the nodal density of states observed in angular resolved photoemission, the persistence of quantum oscillations down to low fields in the vortex state, the small value of density of states from heat capacity and the multiple frequency quantum oscillation pattern consistent with nodal magnetic breakdown of bilayer-split pockets. A nodal Fermi surface pocket is further consistent with the observation of a density of states at the Fermi level concentrated at the nodes in photoemission experiments, and the antinodal pseudogap observed by photoemission, optical conductivity, nuclear magnetic resonance Knight shift, as well as other complementary diffraction, transport and thermodynamic measurements. One of the possibilities considered is that the small Fermi surface pockets observed at high magnetic fields can be understood in terms of Fermi surface reconstruction by a form of small wavevector charge order, observed over long lengthscales in experiments such as nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray scattering, potentially accompanied by an additional mechanism to gap the antinodal density of states.
  • The upper critical fields, $H_{c2}$($T$), of single crystals of the superconductor Ca$_{10}$(Pt$_{4-\delta}$As$_{8}$)((Fe$_{0.97}$Pt$_{0.03}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$)$_{5}$ ($\delta$ $\approx$ 0.246) are determined over a wide range of temperatures down to $T$ = 1.42 K and magnetic fields of up to $\mu_{0}H$ $\simeq$ 92 T. The measurements of anisotropic $H_{c2}$($T$) curves are performed in pulsed magnetic fields using radio-frequency contactless penetration depth measurements for magnetic field applied both parallel and perpendicular to the \textbf{ab}-plane. Whereas a clear upward curvature in $H_{c2}^{\parallel\textbf{c}}$($T$) along \textbf{H}$\parallel$\textbf{c} is observed with decreasing temperature, the $H_{c2}^{\parallel\textbf{ab}}$($T$) along \textbf{H}$\parallel$\textbf{ab} shows a flattening at low temperatures. The rapid increase of the $H_{c2}^{\parallel\textbf{c}}$($T$) at low temperatures suggests that the superconductivity can be described by two dominating bands. The anisotropy parameter, $\gamma_{H}$ $\equiv$ $H_{c2}^{\parallel\textbf{ab}}/H_{c2}^{\parallel\textbf{c}}$, is $\sim$7 close to $T_{c}$ and decreases considerably to $\sim$1 with decreasing temperature, showing rather weak anisotropy at low temperatures.
  • Based on recent magnetic-quantum-oscillation, ARPES, neutron-scattering and other data, we propose that superconductivity in the cuprates occurs via a convenient matching of the spatial distribution of incommensurate spin fluctuations to the amplitude and phase of the $d_{x^2-y^2}$ Cooper-pair wavefunction; this establishes a robust causal relationship between the lengthscale of the fluctuations and the superconducting coherence length. It is suggested that the spin fluctuations are driven by the Fermi surface, which is prone to nesting; they couple to the itinerant holes via the on-site Coulomb correlation energy, which inhibits double occupancy of spins or holes. The maximum energy of the fluctuations gives an appropriate energy scale for the superconducting $T_{\rm c}$. Based on this model, one can specify the design of solids that will exhibit ``high $T_{\rm c}$'' superconductivity.
  • We consider the effect of a short antiferromagnetic correlation length $\xi$ on the electronic bandstructure of the underdoped cuprates. Starting with a Fermi-surface topology similar to that detected in magnetic quantum-oscillation experiments, we show that a reduced $\xi$ gives an assymmetric broadening of the quasiparticle dispersion, resulting in simulated ARPES data very similar to those observed in experiment. Predicted features include the presence of `Fermi arcs' close to $a{\bf k}=(\pi/2,\pi/2)$, without the need to invoke a d-wave pseudogap order parameter. The statistical variation in the ${\bf k}$-space areas of the reconstructed Fermi surface pockets causes the quantum oscillations to be strongly damped, even in very strong magnetic fields, in agreement with experiment.
  • The Fermi surface topology of the organic superconductor \lbets has been determined using the Shubnikov-de Haas and magnetic breakdown effects and angle-dependent magnetoresistance oscillations. The former experiments were carried out in pulsed fields of up to 60 T, whereas the latter employed quasistatic fields of up to 30 T. All of these data show that the Fermi-surface topology of \lbets is very similar to that of the most heavily-studied organic superconductor, \cuscn, except in one important respect; the interplane transfer integral in \lbets is a factor $\sim 10$ larger than that in \cuscn . The increased three-dimensionality of \lbets is manifested in radiofrequency penetration-depth measurements, which show a clear dimensional crossover in the behaviour of $H_{c2}(T)$. The radiofrequency measurements have also been used to extract the Labusch parameter determining the fluxoid interactions as a function of temperature, and to map the flux-lattice melting curve.
  • We show that Landau level broadening in alloys occurs naturally as a consequence of random variations in the local quasiparticle density, without the need to consider a relaxation time. This approach predicts Lorentzian-broadened Landau levels similar to those derived by Dingle using the relaxation-time approximation. However, rather than being determined by a finite relaxation time $\tau$, the Landau-level widths instead depend directly on the rate at which the de Haas-van Alphen frequency changes with alloy composition. The results are in good agreement with recent data from three very different alloy systems.