• We present results from the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation SAG applied on the MultiDark simulation MDPL2. SAG features an updated supernova (SN) feedback scheme and a robust modelling of the environmental effects on satellite galaxies. This incorporates a gradual starvation of the hot gas halo driven by the action of ram pressure stripping (RPS), that can affect the cold gas disc, and tidal stripping (TS), which can act on all baryonic components. Galaxy orbits of orphan satellites are integrated providing adequate positions and velocities for the estimation of RPS and TS. The star formation history and stellar mass assembly of galaxies are sensitive to the redshift dependence implemented in the SN feedback model. We discuss a variant of our model that allows to reconcile the predicted star formation rate density at $z \gtrsim 3$ with the observed one, at the expense of an excess in the faint end of the stellar mass function at $z=2$. The fractions of passive galaxies as a function of stellar mass, halo mass and the halo-centric distances are consistent with observational measurements. The model also reproduces the evolution of the main sequence of star forming central and satellite galaxies. The similarity between them is a result of the gradual starvation of the hot gas halo suffered by satellites, in which RPS plays a dominant role. RPS of the cold gas does not affect the fraction of quenched satellites but it contributes to reach the right atomic hydrogen gas content for more massive satellites ($M_{\star}\gtrsim 10^{10}\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$).
  • We present a comparison of nine galaxy formation models, eight semi-analytical and one halo occupation distribution model, run on the same underlying cold dark matter simulation (cosmological box of co-moving width 125$h^{-1}$ Mpc, with a dark-matter particle mass of $1.24\times 10^9 h^{-1}$ Msun) and the same merger trees. While their free parameters have been calibrated to the same observational data sets using two approaches, they nevertheless retain some 'memory' of any previous calibration that served as the starting point (especially for the manually-tuned models). For the first calibration, models reproduce the observed z = 0 galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) within 3-{\sigma}. The second calibration extended the observational data to include the z = 2 SMF alongside the z~0 star formation rate function, cold gas mass and the black hole-bulge mass relation. Encapsulating the observed evolution of the SMF from z = 2 to z = 0 is found to be very hard within the context of the physics currently included in the models. We finally use our calibrated models to study the evolution of the stellar-to-halo mass (SHM) ratio. For all models we find that the peak value of the SHM relation decreases with redshift. However, the trends seen for the evolution of the peak position as well as the mean scatter in the SHM relation are rather weak and strongly model dependent. Both the calibration data sets and model results are publicly available.
  • We present the public release of the MultiDark-Galaxies: three distinct galaxy catalogues derived from one of the Planck cosmology MultiDark simulations (i.e. MDPL2, with a volume of (1 Gpc/$h$)$^{3}$ and mass resolution of $1.5 \times 10^{9} M_{\odot}/h$) by applying the semi-analytic models GALACTICUS, SAG, and SAGE to it. We compare the three models and their conformity with observational data for a selection of fundamental properties of galaxies like stellar mass function, star formation rate, cold gas fractions, and metallicities - noting that they sometimes perform differently reflecting model designs and calibrations. We have further selected galaxy subsamples of the catalogues by number densities in stellar mass, cold gas mass, and star formation rate in order to study the clustering statistics of galaxies. We show that despite different treatment of orphan galaxies, i.e. galaxies that lost their dark-matter host halo due to the finite mass resolution of the N-body simulation or tidal stripping, the clustering signal is comparable, and reproduces the observations in all three models - in particular when selecting samples based upon stellar mass. Our catalogues provide a powerful tool to study galaxy formation within a volume comparable to those probed by on-going and future photometric and redshift surveys. All model data consisting of a range of galaxy properties - including broad-band SDSS magnitudes - are publicly available.
  • We determine the physical properties of a sample of SMGs in the COSMOS field that were pre-selected at the observed wavelength of $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.1$ mm, and followed up at $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.3$ mm with ALMA. We used MAGPHYS to fit the panchromatic (ultraviolet to radio) SEDs of 124 of the target SMGs, 19.4% of which are spectroscopically confirmed. The SED analysis was complemented by estimating the gas masses of the SMGs by using the $\lambda_{\rm obs}=1.3$ mm emission as a tracer of the molecular gas. The sample median and 16th-84th percentile ranges of the stellar masses, SFRs, dust temperatures, and dust and gas masses were derived to be $\log(M_{\star}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=11.09^{+0.41}_{-0.53}$, ${\rm SFR}=402^{+661}_{-233}$ ${\rm M}_{\odot}~{\rm yr}^{-1}$, $T_{\rm dust}=39.7^{+9.7}_{-7.4}$ K, $\log(M_{\rm dust}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=9.01^{+0.20}_{-0.31}$, and $\log(M_{\rm gas}/{\rm M}_{\odot})=11.34^{+0.20}_{-0.23}$, respectively. The median gas-to-dust ratio and gas fraction were found to be $120^{+73}_{-30}$ and $0.62^{+0.27}_{-0.23}$, respectively. We found that 57.3% of our SMGs populate the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies, while 41.9% of the sources lie above the MS by a factor of >3 (one source lies below the MS). The largest 3 GHz radio sizes are found among the MS sources. Those SMGs that appear irregular in the rest-frame UV are predominantly starbursts, while the MS SMGs are mostly disk-like. The larger radio-emitting sizes of the MS SMGs compared to starbursts is a likely indication of their more widespread, less intense star formation. The irregular UV morphologies of the starburst SMGs are likely to echo their merger nature. Our results suggest that the transition from high-$z$ SMGs to local ellipticals via compact, quiescent galaxies (cQGs) at $z \sim 2$ might not be universal, and the latter population might also descend from the so-called blue nuggets.
  • We present a clustering comparison of 12 galaxy formation models (including Semi-Analytic Models (SAMs) and Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) models) all run on halo catalogues and merger trees extracted from a single {\Lambda}CDM N-body simulation. We compare the results of the measurements of the mean halo occupation numbers, the radial distribution of galaxies in haloes and the 2-Point Correlation Functions (2PCF). We also study the implications of the different treatments of orphan (galaxies not assigned to any dark matter subhalo) and non-orphan galaxies in these measurements. Our main result is that the galaxy formation models generally agree in their clustering predictions but they disagree significantly between HOD and SAMs for the orphan satellites. Although there is a very good agreement between the models on the 2PCF of central galaxies, the scatter between the models when orphan satellites are included can be larger than a factor of 2 for scales smaller than 1 Mpc/h. We also show that galaxy formation models that do not include orphan satellite galaxies have a significantly lower 2PCF on small scales, consistent with previous studies. Finally, we show that the 2PCF of orphan satellites is remarkably different between SAMs and HOD models. Orphan satellites in SAMs present a higher clustering than in HOD models because they tend to occupy more massive haloes. We conclude that orphan satellites have an important role on galaxy clustering and they are the main cause of the differences in the clustering between HOD models and SAMs.
  • We determine the radio size distribution of a large sample of 152 SMGs in COSMOS that were detected with ALMA at 1.3 mm. For this purpose, we used the observations taken by the VLA-COSMOS 3 GHz Large Project. One hundred and fifteen of the 152 target SMGs were found to have a 3 GHz counterpart. The median value of the major axis FWHM at 3 GHz is derived to be $4.6\pm0.4$ kpc. The radio sizes show no evolutionary trend with redshift, or difference between different galaxy morphologies. We also derived the spectral indices between 1.4 and 3 GHz, and 3 GHz brightness temperatures for the sources, and the median values were found to be $\alpha=-0.67$ and $T_{\rm B}=12.6\pm2$ K. Three of the target SMGs, which are also detected with the VLBA, show clearly higher brightness temperatures than the typical values. Although the observed radio emission appears to be predominantly powered by star formation and supernova activity, our results provide a strong indication of the presence of an AGN in the VLBA and X-ray-detected SMG AzTEC/C61. The median radio-emitting size we have derived is 1.5-3 times larger than the typical FIR dust-emitting sizes of SMGs, but similar to that of the SMGs' molecular gas component traced through mid-$J$ line emission of CO. The physical conditions of SMGs probably render the diffusion of cosmic-ray electrons inefficient, and hence an unlikely process to lead to the observed extended radio sizes. Instead, our results point towards a scenario where SMGs are driven by galaxy interactions and mergers. Besides triggering vigorous starbursts, galaxy collisions can also pull out the magnetised fluids from the interacting disks, and give rise to a taffy-like synchrotron-emitting bridge. This provides an explanation for the spatially extended radio emission of SMGs, and can also cause a deviation from the well-known IR-radio correlation.
  • We use the hydrodynamic, cosmological EAGLE simulations to investigate how hot gas in haloes condenses to form and grow galaxies. We select haloes from the simulations that are actively cooling and study the temperature, distribution, and metallicity of their hot, cold, and transitioning `cooling' gas, placing these in context of semi-analytic models. Our selection criteria lead us to focus on Milky Way-like haloes. We find the hot-gas density profiles of the haloes form a progressively stronger core over time, the nature of which can be captured by a beta profile that has a simple dependence on redshift. In contrast, the hot gas that will cool over a time-step is broadly consistent with a singular isothermal sphere. We find that cooling gas carries a few times the specific angular momentum of the halo and is offset in spin direction from the rest of the hot gas. The gas loses ~60% of its specific angular momentum during the cooling process, generally remaining greater than that of the halo, and it precesses to become aligned with the cold gas already in the disc. We find tentative evidence that angular-momentum losses are slightly larger when gas cools onto dispersion-supported galaxies. We show that an exponential surface density profile for gas arriving on a disc remains a reasonable approximation, but a cusp containing ~20% of the mass is always present, and disc scale radii are larger than predicted by a vanilla Fall & Efstathiou model. These scale radii are still closely correlated with the halo spin parameter, for which we suggest an updated prescription for galaxy formation models.
  • We track subhalo orbits of galaxy and group sized halos in cosmological simulations. We identify filamentary structures around halos and we use these to define a sample of subhalos accreted from filaments as well as a control sample of subhalos accreted from other directions. We use these samples to study differences in satellite orbits produced by filamentary accretion. Our results depend on host halo mass. We find that for low masses, subhalos accreted from filaments show $\sim10\%$ shorter lifetimes compared to the control sample, they show a tendency towards more radial orbits, reach halo central regions earlier, and are more likely to merge with the host. For higher mass halos this lifetime difference dissipates and even reverses for cluster sized halos. This behavior appears to be connected to the fact that more massive hosts are connected to stronger filaments with higher velocity coherence and density, with slightly more radial subhalo orbits. Because subhalos tend to follow the coherent flow of the filament, it is possible that such thick filaments are enough to shield the subhalo from the effect of dynamical friction at least during their first infall. We also identify subhalo pairs/clumps which merge with one another after accretion. They survive as a clump for only a very short time, which is even shorter for higher subhalo masses, suggesting that the Magellanic Clouds and other Local group satellite associations, may have entered the MW virial radius very recently and probably are in their first infall. Filaments boost the accretion of satellite associations.
  • We measure the effect of the environment on the intrinsic shapes of spiral and elliptical galaxies by finding the 3D shape distribution and dust extinction that fits better the projected shape of galaxies in different environment. We find that spiral galaxies in groups are very similar to field spirals with similar intrinsic properties (magnitudes, sizes and colours). But for spirals in groups, those in denser environments or closer to the centre of the group tend to have a more circular disc than similar galaxies in less dense environments or far from the group centres. Also we find that central spiral galaxies in their groups tend to be thinner than other similar spirals. For ellipticals, we do not find any important dependence of their shape on their position in a group or on the local density. However, we find that elliptical galaxies in groups tend to be more spherical than field ellipticals with similar intrinsic properties. We find that, once in groups, the shape of member galaxies do not depend on group mass, regardless of their morphological type.
  • We present a comparison of 14 galaxy formation models: 12 different semi-analytical models and 2 halo-occupation distribution models for galaxy formation based upon the same cosmological simulation and merger tree information derived from it. The participating codes have proven to be very successful in their own right but they have all been calibrated independently using various observational data sets, stellar models, and merger trees. In this paper we apply them without recalibration and this leads to a wide variety of predictions for the stellar mass function, specific star formation rates, stellar-to- halo mass ratios, and the abundance of orphan galaxies. The scatter is much larger than seen in previous comparison studies primarily because the codes have been used outside of their native environment within which they are well tested and calibrated. The purpose of the `nIFTy comparison of galaxy formation models' is to bring together as many different galaxy formation modellers as possible and to investigate a common approach to model calibration. This paper provides a unified description for all participating models and presents the initial, uncalibrated comparison as a baseline for our future studies where we will develop a common calibration framework and address the extent to which that reduces the scatter in the model predictions seen here.
  • We present a fast and accurate method to select an optimal set of parameters in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and evolution (SAMs). Our approach compares the results of a model against a set of observables applying a stochastic technique called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), a self-learning algorithm for localizing regions of maximum likelihood in multidimensional spaces that outperforms traditional sampling methods in terms of computational cost. We apply the PSO technique to the SAG semi-analytic model combined with merger trees extracted from a standard $\Lambda$CDM N-body simulation. The calibration is performed using a combination of observed galaxy properties as constraints, including the local stellar mass function and the black hole to bulge mass relation. We test the ability of the PSO algorithm to find the best set of free parameters of the model by comparing the results with those obtained using a MCMC exploration. Both methods find the same maximum likelihood region, however the PSO method requires one order of magnitude less evaluations. This new approach allows a fast estimation of the best-fitting parameter set in multidimensional spaces, providing a practical tool to test the consequences of including other astrophysical processes in SAMs.
  • We present a new technique for modeling submillimeter galaxies (SMGs): the "Count Matching" approach. Using lightcones drawn from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, we choose physical galaxy properties given by the model as proxies for their submillimeter luminosities, assuming a monotonic relationship. As recent interferometric observations of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South show that the brightest sources detected by single-dish telescopes are comprised by emission from multiple fainter sources, we assign the submillimeter fluxes so that the combined LABOCA plus bright-end ALMA observed number counts for this field are reproduced. After turning the model catalogs given by the proxies into submillimeter maps, we perform a source extraction to include the effects of the observational process on the recovered counts and galaxy properties. We find that for all proxies, there are lines of sight giving counts consistent with those derived from LABOCA observations, even for input sources with randomized positions in the simulated map. Comparing the recovered redshift, stellar mass and host halo mass distributions for model SMGs with observational data, we find that the best among the proposed proxies is that in which the submillimeter luminosity increases monotonically with the product between dust mass and SFR. This proxy naturally reproduces a positive trend between SFR and bolometric IR luminosity. The majority of components of blended sources are spatially unassociated.
  • We study the case of DM self annihilation, in order to assess its importance as an energy injection mechanism, to the IGM in general, and to the medium within particular DM haloes. We consider thermal relic WIMP particles with masses of 10GeV and 1TeV and we analyse in detail the clustering properties of DM in a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology, on all hierarchy levels, from haloes and their mass function, to subhaloes and the DM density profiles within them, considering adiabatic contraction by the presence of a SMBH. We then compute the corresponding energy output, concluding that DM annihilation does not constitute an important feedback mechanism. We also calculate the effects that DM annihilation has on the IGM temperature and ionization fraction, and we find that assuming maximal energy absorption, at z ~ 10, for the case of a 1TeV WIMP, the ionization fraction could be raised to $6 \times 10^{-4}$ and the temperature to 10K, and in the case of a 10GeV WIMP, the IGM temperature could be raised to 200K and the ionization fraction to $8 \times 10^{-3}$. We conclude that DM annihilations cannot be regarded as an alternative reionization scenario. Regarding the detectability of the WIMP through the modifications to the 21 cm differential brightness temperature signal ($\delta$Tb), we conclude that a thermal relic WIMP with mass of 1TeV is not likely to be detected from the global signal alone, except perhaps at the 1-3mK level in the frequency range 30MHz < $\nu$ < 35MHz corresponding to 40 < z < 46. However, a 10GeV mass WIMP may be detectable at the 1-3mK level in the frequency range 55MHz < $\nu$ < 119MHz corresponding to 11 < z < 25, and at the 1-10mK level in the frequency range 30MHz < $\nu$ < 40MHz corresponding to 35 < z < 46.
  • We test the cosmological implications of studying galaxy clustering using a tomographic approach, by computing the galaxy two-point angular correlation function $\omega(\theta)$ in thin redshift shells using a spectroscopic-redshift galaxy survey. The advantages of this procedure are that it is not necessary to assume a fiducial cosmology in order to convert measured angular positions and redshifts into distances, and that it gives several (less accurate) measurements of the angular diameter distance $D_\rm{A}(z)$ instead of only one (more precise) measurement of the effective average distance $D_\rm{V}(z)$, which results in better constraints on the expansion history of the Universe. We test our model for $\omega(\theta)$ and its covariance matrix against a set of mock galaxy catalogues and show that this technique is able to extract unbiased cosmological constraints. Also, assuming the best-fit $\Lambda$CDM cosmology from the cosmic microwave background measurements from the Planck satellite, we forecast the result of applying this tomographic approach to the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey catalogue in combination with Planck for three flat cosmological models, and compare them with the expected results of the isotropic baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements post-reconstruction on the same galaxy catalogue combined with Planck. While BAOs are more accurate for constraining cosmological parameters for the standard $\Lambda$CDM model, the tomographic technique gives better results when we allow the dark energy equation of state $w_{DE}$ to deviate from $-1$, resulting in a performance similar to BAOs in the case of a constant value of $w_{DE}$, and a moderate improvement in the case of a time-dependent value of $w_{DE}$, increasing the value of the Figure-of-Merit in the $w_0-w_a$ plane up to $15\%$.
  • By modelling the axis ratio distribution of SDSS DR8 galaxies we find the intrinsic 3D shapes of spirals and ellipticals. We use morphological information from the Galaxy Zoo project and assume a non-parametric distribution intrinsic of shapes, while taking into account dust extinction. We measure the dust extinction of the full sample of spiral galaxies and find a smaller value than previous estimations, with an edge-on extinction of $E_0 = 0.284^{+0.015}_{-0.026}$ in the SDSS r band. We also find that the distribution of minor to major axis ratio has a mean value of $ 0.267 \pm 0.009 $, slightly larger than previous estimates mainly due to the lower extinction used; the same affects the circularity of galactic discs, which are found to be less round in shape than in previous studies, with a mean ellipticity of $0.215 \pm 0.013$. For elliptical galaxies, we find that the minor to major axis ratio, with a mean value of $0.584 \pm 0.006$, is larger than previous estimations due to the removal of spiral interlopers present in samples with morphological information from photometric profiles. These interlopers are removed when selecting ellipticals using Galaxy Zoo data. We find that the intrinsic shapes of galaxies and their dust extinction vary with absolute magnitude, colour and physical size. We find that bright elliptical galaxies are more spherical than faint ones, a trend that is also present with galaxy size, and that there is no dependence of elliptical galaxy shape with colour. For spiral galaxies we find that the reddest ones have higher dust extinction as expected, due to the fact that this reddening is mainly due to dust. We also find that the thickness of discs increases with luminosity and size, and that brighter, smaller and redder galaxies have less round discs.
  • We test and present the application of the full rescaling method by Angulo & White (2010) to change the cosmology of halo catalogues in numerical simulations for cosmological parameter search using semi-analytic galaxy properties. We show that a reduced form of the method can be applied in small simulations with box side of ~50/h Mpc. We perform statistical tests on the accuracy of the properties of rescaled individual haloes, and also on the rescaled population as a whole. We find that individual positions and velocities are recovered with almost no detectable biases. The dispersion in the recovered halo mass does not seem to depend on the resolution of the simulation. Regardless of the halo mass, the individual accretion histories, spin parameter evolution and fraction of mass in substructures are well recovered. The mass of rescaled haloes can be underestimated (overestimated) for negative (positive) variations of either sigma_8 or Omega_m, in a way that does not depend on the halo mass. Statistics of abundances and correlation functions of haloes show also small biases of <10 percent when moving away from the base simulation by up to 2 times the uncertainty in the WMAP7 cosmological parameters. The merger tree properties related to the final galaxy population in haloes also show small biases; the time since the last major merger, the assembly time-scale, and a time-scale related to the stellar ages show correlated biases which indicate that the spectral shapes of galaxies would only be affected by global age changes of ~150 Myr. We show some of these biases for different separations in the cosmological parameters with respect to the desired cosmology so that these can be used to estimate the expected accuracy of the resulting halo population. We also present a way to construct grids of simulations to provide stable accuracy across the Omega_m vs sigma_8 parameter space.
  • We construct catalogues of present superstructures that, according to a LCDM scenario, will evolve into isolated, virialized structures in the future. We use a smoothed luminosity density map derived from galaxies in SDSS-DR7 data and separate high luminosity density peaks. The luminosity density map is obtained from a volume-limited sample of galaxies in the spectroscopic galaxy catalogue, within the SDSS-DR7 footprint area and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.12. Other two samples are constructed for calibration and testing purposes, up to z = 0.10 and z = 0.15. The luminosity of each galaxy is spread using an Epanechnikov kernel of 8Mpc/h radius, and the map is constructed on a 1 Mpc/h cubic cells grid. Future virialized structures (FVS) are identified as regions with overdensity above a given threshold, calibrated using a LCDM numerical simulation, and the criteria presented by D\"unner et al. (2006). We assume a constant mass-to-luminosity ratio and impose the further condition of a minimum luminosity of 10^{12}Lsol. According to our calibrations with a numerical simulation, these criteria lead to a negligible contamination by less overdense (non FVS) superstructures.We present a catalogue of superstructures in the SDSS-DR7 area within redshift 0.04 < z < 0.12 and test the reliability of our method by studying different subsamples as well as a mock catalogue.We compute the luminosity and volume distributions of the superstructures finding that about 10% of the luminosity (mass) will end up in future virialized structures. The fraction of groups and X-ray clusters in these superstructures is higher for groups/clusters of higher mass, suggesting that future cluster mergers will involve the most massive systems. We also analyse known structures in the present Universe and compare with our catalogue of FVS.
  • LSST Science Collaborations: Paul A. Abell, Julius Allison, Scott F. Anderson, John R. Andrew, J. Roger P. Angel, Lee Armus, David Arnett, S. J. Asztalos, Tim S. Axelrod, Stephen Bailey, D. R. Ballantyne, Justin R. Bankert, Wayne A. Barkhouse, Jeffrey D. Barr, L. Felipe Barrientos, Aaron J. Barth, James G. Bartlett, Andrew C. Becker, Jacek Becla, Timothy C. Beers, Joseph P. Bernstein, Rahul Biswas, Michael R. Blanton, Joshua S. Bloom, John J. Bochanski, Pat Boeshaar, Kirk D. Borne, Marusa Bradac, W. N. Brandt, Carrie R. Bridge, Michael E. Brown, Robert J. Brunner, James S. Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, James H. Burge, David L. Burke, Phillip A. Cargile, Srinivasan Chandrasekharan, George Chartas, Steven R. Chesley, You-Hua Chu, David Cinabro, Mark W. Claire, Charles F. Claver, Douglas Clowe, A. J. Connolly, Kem H. Cook, Jeff Cooke, Asantha Cooray, Kevin R. Covey, Christopher S. Culliton, Roelof de Jong, Willem H. de Vries, Victor P. Debattista, Francisco Delgado, Ian P. Dell'Antonio, Saurav Dhital, Rosanne Di Stefano, Mark Dickinson, Benjamin Dilday, S.G. Djorgovski, Gregory Dobler, Ciro Donalek, Gregory Dubois-Felsmann, Josef Durech, Ardis Eliasdottir, Michael Eracleous, Laurent Eyer, Emilio E. Falco, Xiaohui Fan, Christopher D. Fassnacht, Harry C. Ferguson, Yanga R. Fernandez, Brian D. Fields, Douglas Finkbeiner, Eduardo E. Figueroa, Derek B. Fox, Harold Francke, James S. Frank, Josh Frieman, Sebastien Fromenteau, Muhammad Furqan, Gaspar Galaz, A. Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Eric Gawiser, John Geary, Perry Gee, Robert R. Gibson, Kirk Gilmore, Emily A. Grace, Richard F. Green, William J. Gressler, Carl J. Grillmair, Salman Habib, J. S. Haggerty, Mario Hamuy, Alan W. Harris, Suzanne L. Hawley, Alan F. Heavens, Leslie Hebb, Todd J. Henry, Edward Hileman, Eric J. Hilton, Keri Hoadley, J. B. Holberg, Matt J. Holman, Steve B. Howell, Leopoldo Infante, Zeljko Ivezic, Suzanne H. Jacoby, Bhuvnesh Jain, R, Jedicke, M. James Jee, J. Garrett Jernigan, Saurabh W. Jha, Kathryn V. Johnston, R. Lynne Jones, Mario Juric, Mikko Kaasalainen, Styliani Kafka, Steven M. Kahn, Nathan A. Kaib, Jason Kalirai, Jeff Kantor, Mansi M. Kasliwal, Charles R. Keeton, Richard Kessler, Zoran Knezevic, Adam Kowalski, Victor L. Krabbendam, K. Simon Krughoff, Shrinivas Kulkarni, Stephen Kuhlman, Mark Lacy, Sebastien Lepine, Ming Liang, Amy Lien, Paulina Lira, Knox S. Long, Suzanne Lorenz, Jennifer M. Lotz, R. H. Lupton, Julie Lutz, Lucas M. Macri, Ashish A. Mahabal, Rachel Mandelbaum, Phil Marshall, Morgan May, Peregrine M. McGehee, Brian T. Meadows, Alan Meert, Andrea Milani, Christopher J. Miller, Michelle Miller, David Mills, Dante Minniti, David Monet, Anjum S. Mukadam, Ehud Nakar, Douglas R. Neill, Jeffrey A. Newman, Sergei Nikolaev, Martin Nordby, Paul O'Connor, Masamune Oguri, John Oliver, Scot S. Olivier, Julia K. Olsen, Knut Olsen, Edward W. Olszewski, Hakeem Oluseyi, Nelson D. Padilla, Alex Parker, Joshua Pepper, John R. Peterson, Catherine Petry, Philip A. Pinto, James L. Pizagno, Bogdan Popescu, Andrej Prsa, Veljko Radcka, M. Jordan Raddick, Andrew Rasmussen, Arne Rau, Jeonghee Rho, James E. Rhoads, Gordon T. Richards, Stephen T. Ridgway, Brant E. Robertson, Rok Roskar, Abhijit Saha, Ata Sarajedini, Evan Scannapieco, Terry Schalk, Rafe Schindler, Samuel Schmidt, Sarah Schmidt, Donald P. Schneider, German Schumacher, Ryan Scranton, Jacques Sebag, Lynn G. Seppala, Ohad Shemmer, Joshua D. Simon, M. Sivertz, Howard A. Smith, J. Allyn Smith, Nathan Smith, Anna H. Spitz, Adam Stanford, Keivan G. Stassun, Jay Strader, Michael A. Strauss, Christopher W. Stubbs, Donald W. Sweeney, Alex Szalay, Paula Szkody, Masahiro Takada, Paul Thorman, David E. Trilling, Virginia Trimble, Anthony Tyson, Richard Van Berg, Daniel Vanden Berk, Jake VanderPlas, Licia Verde, Bojan Vrsnak, Lucianne M. Walkowicz, Benjamin D. Wandelt, Sheng Wang, Yun Wang, Michael Warner, Risa H. Wechsler, Andrew A. West, Oliver Wiecha, Benjamin F. Williams, Beth Willman, David Wittman, Sidney C. Wolff, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Przemek Wozniak, Patrick Young, Andrew Zentner, Hu Zhan
    A survey that can cover the sky in optical bands over wide fields to faint magnitudes with a fast cadence will enable many of the exciting science opportunities of the next decade. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will have an effective aperture of 6.7 meters and an imaging camera with field of view of 9.6 deg^2, and will be devoted to a ten-year imaging survey over 20,000 deg^2 south of +15 deg. Each pointing will be imaged 2000 times with fifteen second exposures in six broad bands from 0.35 to 1.1 microns, to a total point-source depth of r~27.5. The LSST Science Book describes the basic parameters of the LSST hardware, software, and observing plans. The book discusses educational and outreach opportunities, then goes on to describe a broad range of science that LSST will revolutionize: mapping the inner and outer Solar System, stellar populations in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, the structure of the Milky Way disk and halo and other objects in the Local Volume, transient and variable objects both at low and high redshift, and the properties of normal and active galaxies at low and high redshift. It then turns to far-field cosmological topics, exploring properties of supernovae to z~1, strong and weak lensing, the large-scale distribution of galaxies and baryon oscillations, and how these different probes may be combined to constrain cosmological models and the physics of dark energy.
  • We measure the clustering of galaxy groups in the 2dFGRS Percolation-Inferred Galaxy Group (2PIGG) catalogue. The 2PIGG sample has 29,000 groups with at least two members. The clustering amplitude of the full 2PIGG catalogue is weaker than that of 2dFGRS galaxies, in agreement with theoretical predictions. We have subdivided the 2PIGG catalogue into samples that span a factor of 25 in median total luminosity. Our correlation function measurements span an unprecedented range of clustering strengths, connecting the regimes probed by groups fainter than L* galaxies and rich clusters. There is a steady increase in clustering strength with group luminosity; the most luminous groups are ten times more strongly clustered than the full 2PIGG catalogue. We demonstrate that the 2PIGG results are in very good agreement with the clustering of groups expected in the LCDM model.
  • We use the 2dF Galaxy Group Catalogue constructed by Merch\'an & Zandivarez to study the large scale structure of the Universe traced by galaxy groups. We concentrate on the computation of the power spectrum and the two point correlation function. The resulting group power spectrum shows a similar shape to the galaxy power spectrum obtained from the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey by Percival et al., but with a higher amplitude quantified by a relative bias in redshift space of $b_s(k) \sim 1.5$ . The group two point correlation function for the total sample is well described by a power law with correlation length $s_0=8.9 \pm 0.3 \mpc$ and slope $\gamma=-1.6 \pm 0.1$ on scales $s < 20 \mpc$. In order to study the dependence of the clustering properties on group mass we split the catalogue in four subsamples defined by different ranges of group virial masses. These computations allow a fair estimate of the relation described by the correlation length $s_0$ and the mean intergroup separation $d_c$ for galaxy systems of low mass. We also extend our study to the redshift space distortions of galaxy groups, where we find that the anisotropies in the clustering pattern of the 2dF group catalogue are consistent with gravitational instability, with a flattening of the redshift-space correlation function contours in the direction of the line of sight.
  • We test an analytic model for the two-point correlations of galaxy clusters in redshift space using the Hubble Volume N-body simulations. The correlation function of clusters shows no enhancement along the line of sight, due to the lack of any virialised structures in the cluster distribution. However, the distortion of the clustering pattern due to coherent bulk motions is clearly visible. The distribution of cluster peculiar motions is well described by a Gaussian, except in the extreme high velocity tails. The simulations produce a small but significant number of clusters with large peculiar motions. The form of the redshift space power spectrum is strongly influenced by errors in measured cluster redshifts in extant surveys. When these errors are taken into account, the model reproduces the power spectrum recovered from the simulation to an accuracy of 15% or better over a decade in wavenumber. We compare our analytic predictions with the power spectrum measured from t! he! APM cluster redshift survey. The cluster power spectrum constrains the amplitude of density fluctuations, as measured by the linear rms variance in spheres of radius 8 h^(-1) Mpc, denoted by sigma_8. When combined with the constraints on sigma_8 and the density parameter Omega derived from the local abundance of clusters, we find a best fitting cold dark matter model with sigma_8~1.25 and Omega~0.2, for a power spectrum shape that matches that measured for galaxies. However, for the best fitting value of Omega and given the value of Hubble's constant from recent measurements, the assumed shape of the power spectrum is incompatible with the most readily motivated predictions from the cold dark matter paradigm.
  • The two-point correlation function is computed for galaxies and groups of galaxies selected using 3-dimensional information from the Updated Zwicky Galaxy Catalog - (UZC). The redshift space distortion of the correlation function $\xi(\sigma,\pi)$ in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight, induced by pairwise group peculiar velocities is evaluated. Two methods are used to characterize the pairwise velocity field of groups and galaxies. The best fitting parameters are $\gamma=-1.89 \pm 0.17$ and $r_0=9.7 \pm 4.5$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc for groups, and $\gamma=-2.00 \pm 0.03$ and $r_0=5.29 \pm 0.21$ $h^{-1}$ Mpc for galaxies. We find $\beta_{gx}=0.51 \pm 0.15$ for galaxies, while for groups we obtain a noisy estimate $\beta < 1.5$.