• Wind and hydrokinetic energy turbines are often constrained to locations where the available energy is limited by the operation of the turbines themselves. In two-dimensions, we describe how an array can manipulate the steady flow, redirecting more fluid kinetic energy to itself. Two computational examples of turbine arrays present solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations to illustrate the feasibility of flow manipulation, and motivate an idealized model. Using inviscid fluid dynamics, we underscore the relation between bound vorticity and flow deflection, and between free vorticity and energy extraction. To understand and design flow manipulations that increase the kinetic energy incident on the turbines, we consider an idealized deflector-turbine array constrained to a line segment, acting as an internal flow-boundary. We impose profiles of bound and shed vorticity on this segment by parameterizing the flow deflection and the wake deficit, respectively, and analyze the resulting flow using inviscid fluid dynamics. We find that the power extracted by the array is the product of two components: (i) the deflected kinetic energy incident on the array, and (ii) the array efficiency, both of which vary with deflection strength. The array efficiency, or its ability to extract a fraction of the incident energy, decreases slightly with increasing deflection from about 57\% at weak deflection to 39\% at high deflection. This decrease is outweighed by increasing incident kinetic energy with deflection, resulting in monotonically improved power extraction, thus highlighting the benefits from flow deflection.
  • We present a traveling wave model for a semiconductor diode laser based on quantum wells. The gain model is carefully derived from first principles and implemented with as few phenomeno- logical constants as possible. The transverse energies of the quantum well confined electrons are discretized to automatically capture the effects of spectral and spatial hole burning, gain asym- metry, and the linewidth enhancement factor. We apply this model to semiconductor optical amplifiers and single-section phase-locked lasers. We are able to reproduce the experimental re- sults. The calculated frequency modulated comb shows potential to be a compact, chip-scale comb source without additional external components.
  • We develop an algorithm for model selection which allows for the consideration of a combinatorially large number of candidate models governing a dynamical system. The innovation circumvents a disadvantage of standard model selection which typically limits the number candidate models considered due to the intractability of computing information criteria. Using a recently developed sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics algorithm, the sub-selection of candidate models near the Pareto frontier allows for a tractable computation of AIC (Akaike information criteria) or BIC (Bayes information criteria) scores for the remaining candidate models. The information criteria hierarchically ranks the most informative models, enabling the automatic and principled selection of the model with the strongest support in relation to the time series data. Specifically, we show that AIC scores place each candidate model in the {\em strong support}, {\em weak support} or {\em no support} category. The method correctly identifies several canonical dynamical systems, including an SEIR (susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered) disease model and the Lorenz equations, giving the correct dynamical system as the only candidate model with strong support.
  • Inferring the structure and dynamics of network models is critical to understanding the functionality and control of complex systems, such as metabolic and regulatory biological networks. The increasing quality and quantity of experimental data enable statistical approaches based on information theory for model selection and goodness-of-fit metrics. We propose an alternative method to infer networked nonlinear dynamical systems by using sparsity-promoting $\ell_1$ optimization to select a subset of nonlinear interactions representing dynamics on a fully connected network. Our method generalizes the sparse identification of nonlinear dynamics (SINDy) algorithm to dynamical systems with rational function nonlinearities, such as biological networks. We show that dynamical systems with rational nonlinearities may be cast in an implicit form, where the equations may be identified in the null-space of a library of mixed nonlinearities including the state and derivative terms; this approach applies more generally to implicit dynamical systems beyond those containing rational nonlinearities. This method, implicit-SINDy, succeeds in inferring three canonical biological models: Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics, the regulatory network for competence in bacteria, and the metabolic network for yeast glycolysis.