• We present the fiducial main sequence stellar locus traced by 10 photometric colors observed by SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE. Median colors are determined using 1,052,793 stars with r-band extinction less than 0.125. We use this locus to measure the dust extinction curve relative to the r-band, which is consistent with previous measurements in the SDSS and 2MASS bands. The WISE band extinction coefficients are larger than predicted by standard extinction models. Using 13 lines of sight, we find variations in the extinction curve in H, Ks, and WISE bandpasses. Relative extinction decreases towards Galactic anti-center, in agreement with prior studies. Relative extinction increases with Galactic latitude, in contrast to previous observations. This indicates a universal mid-IR extinction law does not exist due to variations in dust grain size and chemistry with Galactocentric position. A preliminary search for outliers due to warm circumstellar dust is also presented, using stars with high signal-to-noise in the W3-band. We find 199 such outliers, identified by excess emission in Ks-W3. Inspection of SDSS images for these outliers reveals a large number of contaminants due to nearby galaxies. Six sources appear to be genuine dust candidates, yielding a fraction of systems with infrared excess of 0.12$\pm$0.05%.
  • We present continuous, high-precision photometric monitoring data with 1 minute cadence of the dM3e flare star AD Leo with the {\it MOST} satellite. We observed 19 flares in 5.8 days, and find a flare frequency distribution that is similar to previous studies. The light curve reveals a sinusoidal modulation with period of $2.23^{+0.36}_{-0.27}$ days that we attribute to the rotation of a stellar spot rotating into and out of view. We see no correlation between the occurrence of flares and rotational phase, indicating that there may be many spots distributed at different longitudes, or possibly that the modulation is caused by varying surface coverage of a large polar spot that is viewed nearly pole-on. The data show no correlation between flare energy and the time since the previous flare. We use these results to reject a simple model in which all magnetic energy is stored in one active region and released only during flares.