• The behavior of matter near a quantum critical point (QCP) is one of the most exciting and challenging areas of physics research. Emergent phenomena such as high-temperature superconductivity are linked to the proximity to a QCP. Although significant progress has been made in understanding quantum critical behavior in some low dimensional magnetic insulators, the situation in metallic systems is much less clear. Here we demonstrate that NiCoCrx single crystal alloys are remarkable model systems for investigating QCP physics in a metallic environment. For NiCoCrx alloys with x = 0.8, the critical exponents associated with a ferromagnetic quantum critical point (FQCP) are experimentally determined from low temperature magnetization and heat capacity measurements. For the first time, all of the five critical exponents ( gamma-subT =1/2 , beta-subT = 1, delta = 3/2, nuz-subm = 2, alpha-bar-subT = 0) are in remarkable agreement with predictions of Belitz-Kirkpatrick-Vojta (BKV) theory in the asymptotic limit of high disorder. Using these critical exponents, excellent scaling of the magnetization data is demonstrated with no adjustable parameters. We also find a divergence of the magnetic Gruneisen parameter, consistent with a FQCP. This work therefore demonstrates that entropy stabilized concentrated solid solutions represent a unique platform to study quantum critical behavior in a highly tunable class of materials.
  • In pulsed magnetic fields up to 65T and at temperatures below the N\'eel transition, our magnetization and magnetostriction measurements reveal a field-induced metamagnetic-like transition that is suggestive of an antiferromagnetic to polarized paramagnetic or ferrimagnetic ordering. Our data also suggests a change in the nature of this metamagnetic-like transition from second- to first-order-like near a tricritical point at T_{tc} ~145K and H_{c}~52T. At high fields for H>H_{c} we found a decreased magnetic moment roughly half of the moment reported in low field measurements. We propose that \mathit{f-p} hybridization effects and magnetoelastic interactions drive the decreased moment, lack of saturation at high fields, and the decreased phase boundary.
  • We use neutron scattering to compare the magnetic excitations in the hidden order (HO) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases in URu2-xFexSi2 as a function of Fe concentration. The magnetic excitation spectra change significantly between x = 0.05 and x = 0.10, following the enhancement of the AFM ordered moment, in good analogy to the behavior of the parent compound under applied pressure. Prominent lattice-commensurate low-energy excitations characteristic of the HO phase vanish in the AFM phase. The magnetic scattering is dominated by strong excitations along the Brillouin zone edges, underscoring the important role of electron hybridization to both HO and AFM phases, and the similarity of the underlying electronic structure. The stability of the AFM phase is correlated with enhanced local-itinerant electron hybridization.
  • The kagome lattice -- a two-dimensional (2D) arrangement of corner-sharing triangles -- is at the forefront of the search for exotic states generated by magnetic frustration. Such states have been observed experimentally for Heisenberg and planar spins. In contrast, frustration of Ising spins on the kagome lattice has previously been restricted to nano-fabricated systems and spin-ice materials under applied magnetic field. Here, we show that the layered Ising magnet Dy3Mg2Sb3O14 hosts an emergent order predicted theoretically for individual kagome layers of in-plane Ising spins. Neutron-scattering and bulk thermomagnetic measurements, supported by Monte Carlo simulations, reveal a phase transition at T* = 0.3 K from a disordered spin-ice like regime to an "emergent charge ordered" state in which emergent charge degrees of freedom exhibit three-dimensional order while spins remain partially disordered. Our results establish Dy3Mg2Sb3O14 as a tuneable system to study interacting emergent charges arising from kagome Ising frustration.
  • Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) was used to determine the pressure dependence of the f-electron occupancy in the Kondo insulator SmB6. Applied pressure reduces the f-occupancy, but surprisingly, the material maintains a significant divalent character up to a pressure of at least 35 GPa. Thus, the closure of the resistive activation energy gap and onset of magnetic order are not driven by stabilization of an integer valent state. Over the entire pressure range, the material maintains a remarkably stable intermediate valence that can in principle support a nontrivial band structure.
  • Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for the existence of a glassy state, that we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 (SCGO(p)), a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr3+ (s=3/2) ions form a quasi-two-dimensional triangular system of bi-pyramids. Our experimental data shows that as the nonmagnetic Ga3+ impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: a distinct exotic glassy state, which we call a "spin jam", for high magnetic concentration region (p>0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration, (p<0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states in dense frustrated magnets can be understood.
  • The low temperature hidden order state of URu$_2$Si$_2$ has long been a subject of intense speculation, and is thought to represent an as yet undetermined many-body quantum state not realized by other known materials. Here, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and high resolution resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) are used to observe electronic excitation spectra of URu$_2$Si$_2$, as a means to identify the degrees of freedom available to constitute the hidden order wavefunction. Excitations are shown to have symmetries that derive from a correlated $5f^2$ atomic multiplet basis that is modified by itinerancy. The features, amplitude and temperature dependence of linear dichroism are in agreement with ground states that closely resemble the doublet $\Gamma_5$ crystal field state of uranium.
  • We measure gate-tuned thermoelectric power of mechanically exfoliated Bi2Se3 thin films in the topological insulator regime. The sign of the thermoelectric power changes across the charge neutrality point as the majority carrier type switches from electron to hole, consistent with the ambipolar electric field effect observed in conductivity and Hall effect measurements. Near charge neutrality point and at low temperatures, the gate dependent thermoelectric power follows the semiclassical Mott relation using the expected surface state density of states, but is larger than expected at high electron doping, possibly reflecting a large density of states in the bulk gap. The thermoelectric power factor shows significant enhancement near the electron-hole puddle carrier density ~ 0.5 x 1012 cm-2 per surface at all temperatures. Together with the expected reduction of lattice thermal conductivity in low dimensional structures, the results demonstrate that nanostructuring and Fermi level tuning of three dimensional topological insulators can be promising routes to realize efficient thermoelectric devices.
  • We experimentally investigate the symmetry in the Hidden Order (HO) phase of intermetallic URu2Si2 by mapping the lattice and magnetic excitations via inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering measurements in the HO and high-temperature paramagnetic phases. At all temperatures the excitations respect the zone edges of the body-centered tetragonal paramagnetic phase, showing no signs of reduced spatial symmetry, even in the HO phase. The magnetic excitations originate from transitions between hybridized bands and track the Fermi surface, whose feature are corroborated by the phonon measurements. Due to a large hybridization energy scale, a full uranium moment persists in the HO phase, consistent with a lack of observed crystal-field-split states. Our results are inconsistent with local order parameter models and the behavior of typical density waves. We suggest that an order parameter that does not break spatial symmetry would naturally explain these characteristics.
  • We report on electronic transport measurements of dual-gated nano-devices of the low-carrier density topological insulator Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.7Se1.3. In all devices the upper and lower surface states are independently tunable to the Dirac point by the top and bottom gate electrodes. In thin devices, electric fields are found to penetrate through the bulk, indicating finite capacitive coupling between the surface states. A charging model allows us to use the penetrating electric field as a measurement of the inter-surface capacitance $C_{TI}$ and the surface state energy-density relationship $\mu$(n), which is found to be consistent with independent ARPES measurements. At high magnetic fields, increased field penetration through the surface states is observed, strongly suggestive of the opening of a surface state band gap due to broken time-reversal symmetry.
  • The two-dimensional (2D) surface state of the three-dimensional strong topological insulator (STI) is fundamentally distinct from other 2D electron systems in that the Fermi arc encircles an odd number of Dirac points. The TI surface is in the symplectic universality class and uniquely among 2D systems remains metallic and cannot be localized by (time-reversal symmetric) disorder. However, in finite-size samples inter-surface coupling can destroy the topological protection. The question arises: At what size can a thin TI sample be treated as having decoupled topological surface states? We show that weak anti-localization(WAL) is extraordinarily sensitive to sub-meV coupling between top and bottom topological surfaces, and the surfaces of a TI film may be coherently coupled even for thicknesses as large as 12 nm. For thicker films we observe the signature of a true 2D topological metal: perfect weak anti-localization in quantitative agreement with two decoupled surfaces in the symplectic symmetry class.
  • We measure the temperature-dependent carrier density and resistivity of the topological surface state of thin exfoliated Bi2Se3 in the absence of bulk conduction. When the gate-tuned chemical potential is near or below the Dirac point the carrier density is strongly temperature dependent reflecting thermal activation from the nearby bulk valence band, while above the Dirac point, unipolar n-type surface conduction is observed with negligible thermal activation of bulk carriers. In this regime linear resistivity vs. temperature reflects intrinsic electron-acoustic phonon scattering. Quantitative comparison with a theoretical transport calculation including both phonon and disorder effects gives the ratio of deformation potential to Fermi velocity D/\hbarvF = 4.7 {\AA}-1. This strong phonon scattering in the Bi2Se3 surface state gives intrinsic limits for the conductivity and charge carrier mobility at room temperature of ~550 {\mu}S per surface and ~10,000 cm2/Vs.
  • The newly-discovered three-dimensional strong topological insulators (STIs) exhibit topologically-protected Dirac surface states. While the STI surface state has been studied spectroscopically by e.g. photoemission and scanned probes, transport experiments have failed to demonstrate the most fundamental signature of the STI: ambipolar metallic electronic transport in the topological surface of an insulating bulk. Here we show that the surfaces of thin (<10 nm), low-doped Bi2Se3 (\approx10^17/cm3) crystals are strongly electrostatically coupled, and a gate electrode can completely remove bulk charge carriers and bring both surfaces through the Dirac point simultaneously. We observe clear surface band conduction with linear Hall resistivity and well-defined ambipolar field effect, as well as a charge-inhomogeneous minimum conductivity region. A theory of charge disorder in a Dirac band explains well both the magnitude and the variation with disorder strength of the minimum conductivity (2 to 5 e^2/h per surface) and the residual (puddle) carrier density (0.4 x 10^12 cm^-2 to 4 x 10^12 cm^-2). From the measured carrier mobilities 320 cm^2/Vs to 1,500 cm^2/Vs, the charged impurity densities 0.5 x 10^13 cm^-2 to 2.3 x 10^13 cm^-2 are inferred. They are of a similar magnitude to the measured doping levels at zero gate voltage (1 x 10^13 cm^-2 to 3 x 10^13 cm^-2), identifying dopants as the charged impurities.
  • Ultrathin (~3 quintuple layer) field-effect transistors (FETs) of topological insulator Bi2Se3 are prepared by mechanical exfoliation on 300nm SiO2/Si susbtrates. Temperature- and gate-voltage dependent conductance measurements show that ultrathin Bi2Se3 FETs are n-type, and have a clear OFF state at negative gate voltage, with activated temperature-dependent conductance and energy barriers up to 250 meV.
  • Thin (6-7 quintuple layer) topological insulator Bi2Se3 quantum dot devices are demonstrated using ultrathin (2~4 quintuple layer) Bi2Se3 regions to realize semiconducting barriers which may be tuned from Ohmic to tunneling conduction via gate voltage. Transport spectroscopy shows Coulomb blockade with large charging energy >5 meV, with additional features implying excited states.
  • The noncentrosymmetric Half Heusler compound YPtBi exhibits superconductivity below a critical temperature T_c = 0.77 K with a zero-temperature upper critical field H_c2(0) = 1.5 T. Magnetoresistance and Hall measurements support theoretical predictions that this material is a topologically nontrivial semimetal having a surprisingly low positive charge carrier density of 2 x 10^18 cm^-3. Unconventional linear magnetoresistance and beating in Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations point to spin-orbit split Fermi surfaces. The sensitivity of magnetoresistance to surface roughness suggests a possible contribution from surface states. The combination of noncentrosymmetry and strong spin-orbit coupling in YPtBi presents a promising platform for the investigation of topological superconductivity.
  • Fe1+xTe0.5Se0.5 is the archetypical iron-based superconductor. Here we show that the superconducting state is controlled by the stacking of its anti-PbO layers, such that homogeneous ordering hinders superconductivity and the highest volume fractions are observed in phase separated structures as evidenced by either a distribution of lattice parameters or microstrain.
  • Nitrogen gas accidentally sealed in a sample container produces various spurious effects in elastic neutron scattering measurements. These effects are systematically investigated and the details of the spurious scattering are presented.
  • Superconductivity has been explored in single crystals of the Ni-doped FeAs-compound SrFe2-xNixAs2 grown by self-flux solution method. The antiferromagnetic order associated with the magnetostructural transition of the parent compound SrFe2As2 is gradually suppressed with increasing Ni concentration x and bulk-phase superconductivity with full diamagnetic screening is induced near the optimal doping of x = 0.15 with a maximum transition temperature Tc ~9.8 K. An investigation of high-temperature annealing on as-grown samples indicate that the heat treatment can enhance Tc as much as ~50 %.
  • The onset of antiferromagnetic order in URu2Si2 has been studied via neutron diffraction in a helium pressure medium, which most closely approximates hydrostatic conditions. The antiferromagnetic critical pressure is 0.80 GPa, considerably higher than values previously reported. Complementary electrical resistivity measurements imply that the hidden order-antiferromagnetic bicritical point far exceeds 1.02 GPa. Moreover, the redefined pressure-temperature phase diagram suggests that the superconducting and antiferromagnetic phase boundaries actually meet at a common critical pressure at zero temperature.
  • We have systematically investigated the doping and the directional dependence of the gap structure in the 122-type iron pnictide superconductors by point contact Andreev reflection spectroscopy. The studies were performed on single crystals of Ba1-xKxFe2As2 (x = 0.29, 0.49, and 0.77) and SrFe1.74Co0.26As2 with a sharp tip of Pb or Au pressed along the c-axis or the ab-plane direction. The conductance spectra obtained on highly transparent contacts clearly show evidence of a robust superconducting gap. The normalized curves can be well described by the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk model with a lifetime broadening. The determined gap value scales very well with the transition temperature, giving the 2{\Delta}/kBTC value of ~ 3.1. The results suggest the presence of a universal coupling behavior in this class of iron pnictides over a broad doping range and independent of the sign of the doping. Moreover, conductance spectra obtained on c-axis junctions and ab-plane junctions indicate that the observed gap is isotropic in these superconductors.
  • The effect of alkaline earth substitution on structural parameters was studied in high-quality single crystals of Ba(1-x)Sr(x)Fe2As2 and Sr(1-x)Ca(x)Fe2As2 grown by the self-flux method. The results of single-crystal and powder x-ray diffraction measurements suggest a continuous monotonic decrease of both a- and c-axis lattice parameters, the c/a tetragonal ratio, and the unit cell volume with decreasing alkaline earth atomic radius as expected by Vegard's law. As a result, the system experiences a continuously increasing chemical pressure effect in traversing the phase diagram from x=0 in Ba(1-x)Sr(x)Fe2As2 to x=1 in Sr(1-x)Ca(x)Fe2As2.
  • While evidence of a topologically nontrivial surface state has been identified in surface-sensitive measurements of Bi2Se3, a significant experimental concern is that no signatures have been observed in bulk transport. In a search for such states, nominally undoped single crystals of Bi2Se3 with carrier densities approaching 10^16 cm^-3 and very high mobilities exceeding 2 m^2 V^-1 s^-1 have been studied. A comprehensive analysis of Shubnikov de Haas oscillations, Hall effect, and optical reflectivity indicates that the measured electrical transport can be attributed solely to bulk states, even at 50 mK at low Landau level filling factor, and in the quantum limit. The absence of a significant surface contribution to bulk conduction demonstrates that even in very clean samples, the surface mobility is lower than that of the bulk, despite its topological protection.
  • Substitution of Re for Ru in the heavy fermion compound URu2Si2 suppresses the hidden order transition and gives rise to ferromagnetism at higher concentrations. The hidden order transition of URu(2-x)Re(x)Si2, tracked via specific heat and electrical resistivity measurements, decreases in temperature and broadens, and is no longer observed for x>0.1. A critical scaling analysis of the bulk magnetization indicates that the ferromagnetic ordering temperature and ordered moment are suppressed continuously towards zero at a critical concentration of x = 0.15, accompanied by the additional suppression of the critical exponents gamma and (delta-1) towards zero. This unusual trend appears to reflect the underlying interplay between Kondo and ferromagnetic interactions, and perhaps the proximity of the hidden order phase.
  • Magnetic critical scaling in URu2-xRexSi2 single crystals continuously evolves as the ferromagnetic critical temperature is tuned towards zero via chemical substitution. As the quantum phase transition is approached, the critical exponents gamma and (delta-1) decrease to zero in tandem with the critical temperature and ordered moment, while the exponent beta remains constant. This novel trend distinguishes URu2-xRexSi2 from stoichiometric quantum critical ferromagnets and appears to reflect an underlying competition between Kondo and ferromagnetic interactions.