• We report the serendipitous discovery of a dusty, starbursting galaxy at z=5.667 (called CRLE hereafter), in close physical association to the "normal" Main Sequence galaxy HZ10 at z=5.654. CRLE was identified by detection of [CII], [NII] and CO(2-1) line emission, making it the highest redshift, most luminous starburst in the COSMOS field. This massive, dusty galaxy appears to be forming stars at a rate of at least 1500$\,M_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ in a compact region only ~3 kpc in diameter. The dynamical and dust emission properties of CRLE suggest an ongoing merger driving the starburst, in a potentially intermediate stage relative to other known dusty galaxies at the same epoch. The ratio of [CII] to [NII] may suggest that an important contribution to the [CII] emission comes from a diffuse ionized gas component, which could be more extended than the dense, starbursting gas. CRLE appears to be located in a significant galaxy overdensity at the same redshift, potentially associated with a large scale cosmic structure recently identified in a Lyman Alpha Emitter survey. This overdensity suggests that CRLE and HZ10 reside in a protocluster environment, offering the tantalizing opportunity to study the effect of a massive starburst on protocluster star formation. Our findings support the interpretation that a significant fraction of the earliest galaxy formation may occur from the inside-out, within the central regions of the most massive halos, while rapidly evolving into the massive galaxy clusters observed in the local Universe.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870um observations of 29 bright Herschel sources near high-redshift QSOs. The observations confirm that 20 of the Herschel sources are submillimeter-bright galaxies (SMGs) and identify 16 new SMG-QSO pairs that are useful to studies of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of SMGs. Eight out of the 20 SMGs are blends of multiple 870um sources. The angular separations for six of the Herschel-QSO pairs are less than 10", comparable to the sizes of the Herschel beam and the ALMA primary beam. We find that four of these six "pairs" are actually QSOs hosted by SMGs. No additional submillimeter companions are detected around these QSOs and the rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of the QSOs show no evidence of significant reddening. Black hole accretion and star formation contribute almost equally in bolometric luminosity in these galaxies. The SMGs hosting QSOs show similar source sizes, dust surface densities, and SFR surface densities as other SMGs in the sample. We find that the black holes are growing $\sim$3$\times$ faster than the galaxies when compared to the present-day black-hole-galaxy mass ratio, suggesting a QSO duty cycle of $\lesssim$30% in SMGs at z ~ 3. The remaining two Herschel-detected QSOs are undetected at 870um but each has an SMG "companion" only 9" and 12" away (71 and 95 kpc at z = 3). They could be either merging or projected pairs. If the former, they would represent a rare class of "wet-dry" mergers. If the latter, the QSOs would, for the first time, probe the CGM of SMGs at impact parameters below 100 kpc.
  • We present 90 mas (37 pc) resolution ALMA imaging of Arp 220 in the CO (1-0) line and continuum at $\lambda = 2.6$ mm. The internal gas distribution and kinematics of both galactic nuclei are well-resolved for the first time. In the West nucleus, the major gas and dust emission extends out to 0.2\arcsec radius (74 pc); the central resolution element shows a strong peak in the dust emission but a factor 3 dip in the CO line emission. In this nucleus, the dust is apparently optically thick ($\tau_{\rm 2.6mm} \sim1$) at $\lambda = 2.6$ mm with a dust brightness temperature $\sim147$ K. The column of ISM at this nucleus is $\rm N_{H2} \geq 2\times10^{26}$ cm$^{-2}$, corresponding to $\sim$900 gr cm$^{-2}$. The East nucleus is more elongated with radial extent 0.3\arcsec or $\sim111$ pc. The derived kinematics of the nuclear disks provide a good fit to the line profiles, yielding the emissivity distributions, the rotation curves and velocity dispersions. In the West nucleus, there is evidence of a central Keplerian component requiring a central mass of $8\times10^8$ \msun. The intrinsic widths of the emission lines are $\Delta \rm v (FWHM)$ = 250 (West) and 120 (East) \kms. Given the very short dissipation timescales for turbulence ($\lesssim10^5$ yrs), we suggest that the line widths may be due to semi-coherent motions within the nuclear disks. The symmetry of the nuclear disk structures is impressive -- implying the merger timescale is significantly longer than the rotation period of the disks.
  • We present a detailed study of a molecular outflow feature in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253 using ALMA. We find that this feature is clearly associated with the edge of NGC 253's prominent ionized outflow, has a projected length of ~300 pc, with a width of ~50 pc and a velocity dispersion of ~40 km s^-1, consistent with an ejection from the disk about 1 Myr ago. The kinematics of the molecular gas in this feature can be interpreted (albeit not uniquely) as accelerating at a rate of 1 km s^-1 pc^-1. In this scenario, the gas is approaching escape velocity at the last measured point. Strikingly, bright tracers of dense molecular gas (HCN, CN, HCO+, CS) are also detected in the molecular outflow: We measure an HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) line ratio of ~1/10 in the outflow, similar to that in the central starburst region of NGC 253 and other starburst galaxies. By contrast, the HCN/CO line ratio in the NGC 253 disk is significantly lower (~1/30), similar to other nearby galaxy disks. This strongly suggests that the streamer gas originates from the starburst, and that its physical state does not change significantly over timescales of ~1 Myr during its entrainment in the outflow. Simple calculations indicate that radiation pressure is not the main mechanism for driving the outflow. The presence of such dense material in molecular outflows needs to be accounted for in simulations of galactic outflows.
  • We observe Arp 220, the nearest Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxy (ULIRG), over 4 GHz in the K and Ka bands. We provide constraints for the kinematics,morphology, and identify molecular species on scales resolving both nuclei (0.6" or 230 pc). We detect multiple molecular species, including hydroxyl in both cores. We tentatively detect H2O at 21.84 GHz in both nuclei, indicating the likely presence of maser emission. The observed frequency range also contains metastable ammonia transitions from (J,K) = (1,1) to (5,5), as well as the (9,9) inversion line, which, together are a well-known thermometer of dense molecular gas. Furthermore, the non-metastable (4,2) and (10,9) and possibly the (3,1) lines are also detected. We apply a standard temperature analysis to Arp 220. However, the analysis is complicated in that standard LTE assumptions do not hold. There are indications that a substantial fraction of ammonia could be in the non-metastable transitions as opposed to only the metastable ones. Thus, the non-metastable transitions could be essential to constraining the temperature. We compare all of these data to ALMA observations of this source, confirming the outflow previously observed by other tracers in both nuclei.
  • Our current understanding of galaxy evolution still has many uncertainties associated with the details of accretion, processing, and removal of gas across cosmic time. The next generation of radio telescopes will image the neutral hydrogen (HI) in galaxies over large volumes at high redshifts, which will provide key insights into these processes. We are conducting the COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, which is the first survey to simultaneously observe HI from z=0 to z~0.5. Here, we report the highest redshift HI 21-cm detection in emission to date of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) COSMOS J100054.83+023126.2 at z=0.376 with the first 178 hours of CHILES data. The total HI mass is $(2.9\pm1.0)\times10^{10}~M_\odot$, and the spatial distribution is asymmetric and extends beyond the galaxy. While optically the galaxy looks undisturbed, the HI distribution suggests an interaction with candidate a candidate companion. In addition, we present follow-up Large Millimeter Telescope CO observations that show it is rich in molecular hydrogen, with a range of possible masses of $(1.8-9.9)\times10^{10}~M_\odot$. This is the first study of the HI and CO in emission for a single galaxy beyond z~0.2.
  • We study the effects of local environment and stellar mass on galaxy properties using a mass complete sample of quiescent and star-forming systems in the COSMOS field at $z\lesssim$ 3. We show that at $z\lesssim$ 1, the median star-formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR) of all galaxies depend on environment, but they become independent of environment at $z\gtrsim$ 1. However, we find that only for \textit{star-forming} galaxies, the median SFR and sSFR are similar in different environments, regardless of redshift and stellar mass. We find that the quiescent fraction depends on environment at $z\lesssim$ 1, and on stellar mass out to $z\sim$ 3. We show that at $z\lesssim$ 1, galaxies become quiescent faster in denser environments and that the overall environmental quenching efficiency increases with cosmic time. Environmental and mass quenching processes depend on each other. At $z\lesssim$ 1, denser environments more efficiently quench galaxies with higher masses (log($M/M_{\odot}$)$\gtrsim$ 10.7), possibly due to a higher merger rate of massive galaxies in denser environments, and that mass quenching is more efficient in denser regions. We show that the overall mass quenching efficiency ($\epsilon_{mass}$) for more massive galaxies (log($M/M_{\odot}$)$\gtrsim$ 10.2) rises with cosmic time until $z\sim$ 1 and flattens out since then. However, for less massive galaxies, the rise in $\epsilon_{mass}$ continues to the present time. Our results suggest that environmental quenching is only relevant at $z\lesssim$ 1, likely a fast process, whereas mass quenching is the dominant mechanism at $z\gtrsim$ 1, with a possible stellar feedback physics.
  • We use observed optical to near infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 266 galaxies in the COSMOS survey to derive the wavelength dependence of the dust attenuation at high redshift. All of the galaxies have spectroscopic redshifts in the range z = 2 to 6.5. The presence of the CIV absorption feature, indicating that the rest-frame UV-optical SED is dominated by OB stars, is used to select objects for which the intrinsic, unattenuated spectrum has a well-established shape. Comparison of this intrinsic spectrum with the observed broadband photometric SED then permits derivation of the wavelength dependence of the dust attenuation. The derived dust attenuation curve is similar in overall shape to the Calzetti curve for local starburst galaxies. We also see the 2175 \AA~bump feature which is present in the Milky Way and LMC extinction curves but not seen in the Calzetti curve. The bump feature is commonly attributed to graphite or PAHs. No significant dependence is seen with redshift between sub-samples at z = 2 - 4 and z = 4 - 6.5. The 'extinction' curve obtained here provides a firm basis for color and extinction corrections of high redshift galaxy photometry.
  • We report ALMA Band 7 (350 GHz) imaging at 0.4 - 0.6arcsec resolution and Band 9 (696 GHz) at ~0.25arcsec resolution of the luminous IR galaxies Arp 220 and NGC 6240. The long wavelength dust continuum is used to estimate ISM masses for Arp 220 East, West and NGC 6240 of 1.9, 4.2 and 1.6x10^9 msun within radii of 69, 65 and 190 pc. The HCN emission was modeled to derive the emissivity distribution as a function of radius and the kinematics of each nuclear disk, yielding dynamical masses consistent with the masses and sizes derived from the dust emission. In Arp 220, the major dust and gas concentrations are at radii less than 50 pc in both counter-rotating nuclear disks. The thickness of the disks in Arp 220estimated from the velocity dispersion and rotation velocities are 10-20 pc and the mean gas densities are n_H2 ~10^5 cm^-3 at R < 50 pc. We develop an analytic treatment for the molecular excitation (including photon trapping), yielding volume densities for both the HCN and CS emission with n_H2 ~2x10^5 cm^-3. The agreement of the mean density from the total mass and size with that required for excitation suggests that the volume is essentially filled with dense gas, i.e. it is not cloudy or like swiss cheese.
  • Using the first 50% of data collected for the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH) observations on the 1.8 deg$^2$ Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) we estimate the masses and star formation rates of 3398 $M_*>10^{10}M_\odot $ star-forming galaxies at $4 < z < 6$ with a substantial population up to $M_* \gtrsim 10^{11.5} M_\odot$. We find that the strong correlation between stellar mass and star formation rate seen at lower redshift (the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies) extends to $z\sim6$. The observed relation and scatter is consistent with a continued increase in star formation rate at fixed mass in line with extrapolations from lower-redshift observations. It is difficult to explain this continued correlation, especially for the most massive systems, unless the most massive galaxies are forming stars near their Eddington-limited rate from their first collapse. Furthermore, we find no evidence for moderate quenching at higher masses, indicating quenching either has not occurred prior to $z \sim 6$ or else occurs rapidly, so that few galaxies are visible in transition between star-forming and quenched.
  • We examine the use of submm recombination lines of H, He and He$^+$ to probe the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) luminosity of starbursts (SB) and AGN. We find that the submm recombination lines of H, He and He$^+$ are in fact extremely reliable and quantitative probes of the EUV continuum at 13.6 eV to above 54.6 eV. At submm wavelengths, the recombination lines originate from low energy levels (n = 20 -- 50). The maser amplification, which poses significant problems for quantitative interpretation of the higher n, radio frequency recombination lines, is insignificant. Lastly, at submm wavelengths the dust extinction is minimal. The submm line luminosities are therefore directly proportional to the emission measures ($EM_{ION} = n_e \times n_{ion} \times \rm{volume}$) of their ionized regions. We also find that the expected line fluxes are detectable with ALMA and can be imaged at $\sim0.1$\arcsec ~resolution in low redshift ULIRGs. Imaging of the HI lines will provide accurate spatial and kinematic mapping of the star formation distribution in low-z IR-luminous galaxies. And the relative fluxes of the HI and HeII recombination lines will strongly constrain the relative contributions of starbursts and AGN to the luminosity. The HI lines should also provide an avenue to constraining the submm dust extinction curve.
  • We present an empirical method of assessing the star formation rate (SFR) of star-forming galaxies based on their locations in the rest-frame color-color diagram (NUV-r) vs (r-K). By using the Spitzer 24 micron sample in the COSMOS field (~16400 galaxies with 0.2 < z < 1.3) and a local GALEX-SDSS-SWIRE sample (~700 galaxies with z < 0.2), we show that the mean infrared excess <IRX>= < L_IR / L_UV > can be described by a single vector, NRK, that combines the two colors. The calibration between <IRX> and NRK allows us to recover the IR luminosity, L_IR, with an accuracy of ~0.21 dex for the COSMOS sample and ~0.27 dex for the local one. The SFRs derived with this method agree with the ones based on the observed (UV+IR) luminosities and on the spectral energy distribution fitting for the vast majority (~85 %) of the star-forming population. Thanks to a library of model galaxy SEDs with realistic prescriptions for the star formation history, we show that we need to include a two-component dust model (i.e., birth clouds and diffuse ISM) and a full distribution of galaxy inclinations in order to reproduce the behavior of the <IRX> stripes in the NUVrK diagram. In conclusion, the NRK method, based only on rest-frame UV and optical colors available in most of the extragalactic fields, offers a simple alternative of assessing the SFR of star-forming galaxies in the absence of far-IR or spectral diagnostic observations.
  • We resolve 182 individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) larger than 2.5 $\times$ 10$^{5}$ \Msun in the inner disks of five large nearby spiral galaxies (NGC 2403, NGC 3031, NGC 4736, NGC 4826, and NGC 6946) to create the largest such sample of extragalactic GMCs within galaxies analogous to the Milky Way. Using a conservatively chosen sample of GMCs most likely to adhere to the virial assumption, we measure cloud sizes, velocity dispersions, and $^{12}$CO (J=1-0) luminosities and calculate cloud virial masses. The average conversion factor from CO flux to H$_{2}$ mass (or \xcons) for each galaxy is 1-2 \xcounits, all within a factor of two of the Milky Way disk value ($\sim$2 \xcounits). We find GMCs to be generally consistent within our errors between the galaxies and with Milky Way disk GMCs; the intrinsic scatter between clouds is of order a factor of two. Consistent with previous studies in the Local Group, we find a linear relationship between cloud virial mass and CO luminosity, supporting the assumption that the clouds in this GMC sample are gravitationally bound. We do not detect a significant population of GMCs with elevated velocity dispersions for their sizes, as has been detected in the Galactic center. Though the range of metallicities probed in this study is narrow, the average conversion factors of these galaxies will serve to anchor the high metallicity end of metallicity-\xco trends measured using conversion factors in resolved clouds; this has been previously possible primarily with Milky Way measurements.
  • High-resolution 21-cm HI deep fields provide spatially and kinematically resolved neutral gas maps at different redshifts, which are key to understanding galaxy evolution across cosmic time and testing predictions of cosmological simulations. Here we present results from a pilot for the COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) done with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We take advantage of the newly expanded capabilities of the telescope to probe the redshift interval 0<z<0.193 in one observation. We observe the COSMOS field for 50 hours, which contains 413 galaxies with optical spectroscopic redshifts in the imaged field of view of 34' x 34' and the observed redshift interval. We have detected neutral hydrogen gas in 33 galaxies in different environments spanning the probed redshift range, including three without a previously known spectroscopic redshift. The detections have a range of HI and stellar masses, indicating the diversity of galaxies we are probing. We discuss the observations, data reduction, results and highlight interesting detections. We find that the VLA's B-array is the ideal configuration for HI deep fields since its long spacings mitigate RFI. This pilot shows that the VLA is ready to carry out such a survey, and serves as a test for future HI deep fields planned with other SKA pathfinders.
  • We explore the possibility that the G2 gas cloud falling in towards \sgra is the mass loss envelope of a young TTauri star. As the star plunges to smaller radius at 1000 to 6000 \kms, a strong bow shock forms where the stellar wind is impacted by the hot X-ray emitting gas in the vicinity of \sgra. For a stellar mass loss rate of $4\times10^{-8}$ \msun per yr and wind velocity 100 \kms, the bow shock will have an emission measure ($EM = n^2 vol$) at a distance $\sim10^{16}$ cm, similar to that inferred from the IR emission lines. The ionization of the dense bow shock gas is potentially provided by collisional ionization at the shock front and cooling radiation (X-ray and UV) from the post shock gas. The former would predict a constant line flux as a function of distance from \sgra, while the latter will have increasing emission at lesser distances. In this model, the star and its mass loss wind should survive pericenter passage since the wind is likely launched at 0.2 AU and this is much less than the Roche radius at pericenter ($\sim3$ AU for a stellar mass of 2\msun). In this model, the emission cloud will probably survive pericenter passage, discriminating this scenario from others.
  • We investigate spectroscopically measured Ly{\alpha} equivalent widths and escape fractions of 244 sources of which 95 are Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) and 106 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z~4.2, z~4.8, and z~5.6 selected from intermediate and narrow band observations. The sources were selected from the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS), and observed with the DEIMOS spectrograph. We find that the distribution of equivalent widths shows no evolution with redshift for both the LBG selected sources and the intermediate/narrowband LAEs. We also find that the Ly{\alpha} escape fraction of intermediate and narrow band LAEs is on average higher and has a larger variation than the escape fraction of LBG selected sources. The escape fraction does not show a dependence with redshift. Similar to what has been found for LAEs at low redshifts, the sources with the highest extinctions show the lowest escape fractions. The range of escape fractions increases with decreasing extinction. This is evidence that the dust extinction is the most important factor affecting the escape of Ly{\alpha} photons, but at low extinctions other factors such as HI covering fraction and gas kinematics can be just as effective at inhibiting the escape of Ly{\alpha} photons.
  • We present the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog (ACS-GC), a photometric and morphological database using publicly available data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. The goal of the ACS-GC database is to provide a large statistical sample of galaxies with reliable structural and distance measurements to probe the evolution of galaxies over a wide range of look-back times. The ACS-GC includes approximately 470,000 astronomical sources (stars + galaxies) derived from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. Galapagos was used to construct photometric (SExtractor) and morphological (Galfit) catalogs. The analysis assumes a single S\'ersic model for each object to derive quantitative structural parameters. We include publicly available redshifts from the DEEP2, COMBO-17, TKRS, PEARS, ACES, CFHTLS,and zCOSMOS surveys to supply redshifts (spectroscopic and photometric) for a considerable fraction (~74%) of the imaging sample. The ACS-GC includes color postage stamps, Galfit residual images, and photometry, structural parameters, and redshifts combined into a single catalog.
  • In the theory of structure formation, galaxies are biased tracers of the underlying matter density field. The statistical relation between galaxy and matter density field is commonly referred as galaxy bias. In this paper, we test the linear bias model with weak-lensing and galaxy clustering measurements in the 2 square degrees COSMOS field (Scoville et al. 2007). We estimate the bias of galaxies between redshifts z=0.2 and z=1, and over correlation scales between R=0.2 h^-1 Mpc and R=15 h^-1 Mpc. We focus on three galaxy samples, selected in flux (simultaneous cuts I_814W < 26.5 and K_s < 24), and in stellar-mass (10^9 < M_* < 10^10 h^-2 Msun and 10^10 < M^*< 10^11 h^-2 Msun). At scales R > 2 h^-1 Mpc, our measurements support a model of bias increasing with redshift. The Tinker et al. (2010) fitting function provides a good fit to the data. We find the best fit mass of the galaxy halos to be log(M_200 h^-1 Msun) = 11.7^+0.6_-1.3 and log(M_200 h^-1 Msun) = 12.4^+0.2_-2.9 respectively for the low and high stellar-mass samples. In the halo model framework, bias is scale-dependent with a change of slope at the transition scale between the one and the two halo terms. We detect a scale-dependence of bias with a turn-down at scale R=2.3\pm1.5 h^-1 Mpc, in agreement with previous galaxy clustering studies. We find no significant amount of stochasticity, suggesting that a linear bias model is sufficient to describe our data. We use N-body simulations to quantify both the amount of cosmic variance and systematic errors in the measurement.
  • In order to understand environmental effects on star formation in high-redshift galaxies, we investigate the physical relationships between the star formation activity, stellar mass, and environment for z ~1.2 galaxies in the 2 deg^2 COSMOS field. We estimate star formation using the [OII] emission line and environment from the local galaxy density. Our analysis shows that for massive galaxies M_*>10^10 M_sun, the fraction of [OII] emitters in high-density environments is 1.7 times higher than in low-density environments, while the [OII] emitter fraction does not depend on environment for low-mass M_* < 10^10 M_sun galaxies. In order to understand what drives these trends, we investigate the role of companion galaxies in our sample. We find that the fraction of [OII] emitters in galaxies with companions is 2.4 times as high as that in galaxies without companions at M_* > 10^10 M_sun. In addition, massive galaxies are more likely to have companions in high-density environments. However, although the "number" of star forming galaxies increases for massive galaxies with close companions and in dense environments, the "average" star formation rate of star forming galaxies at a given mass is independent of environment and the presence/absence of a close companion. These results suggest that interactions and/or mergers in high-density environment could induce star formation in massive galaxies at z~1.2, increasing the fraction of star-forming galaxies with M_* > 10^10 M_sun.
  • Gravitational lensing can provide pure geometric tests of the structure of space-time, for instance by determining empirically the angular diameter distance-redshift relation. This geometric test has been demonstrated several times using massive clusters which produce a large lensing signal. In this case, matter at a single redshift dominates the lensing signal, so the analysis is straightforward. It is less clear how weaker signals from multiple sources at different redshifts can be stacked to demonstrate the geometric dependence. We introduce a simple measure of relative shear which for flat cosmologies separates the effect of lens and source positions into multiplicative terms, allowing signals from many different source-lens pairs to be combined. Applying this technique to a sample of groups and low-mass clusters in the COSMOS survey, we detect a clear variation of shear with distance behind the lens. This represents the first detection of the geometric effect using weak lensing by multiple, low-mass systems. The variation of distance with redshift is measured with sufficient precision to constrain the equation of state of the universe under the assumption of flatness, equivalent to a detection of a dark energy component Omega_X at greater than 99% confidence for an equation-of-state parameter -2.5 < w < -0.1. For the case w = -1, we find a value for the cosmological constant density parameter Omega_Lambda = 0.85+0.044-0.19 (68% C.L.), and detect cosmic acceleration (q_0 < 0) at the 98% C.L.. We consider the systematic uncertainties associated with this technique and discuss the prospects for applying it in forthcoming weak-lensing surveys.
  • We present the largest sample to date of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a substantial spiral galaxy other than the Milky Way. We map the distribution of molecular gas with high resolution and image fidelity within the central 5 kpc of the spiral galaxy NGC 6946 in the 12CO (J=1-0) transition. By combining observations from the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45-meter single dish telescope and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) interferometer, we are able to obtain high image fidelity and accurate measurements of LCO compared with previous purely interferometric studies. We resolve individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs), measure their luminosities and virial masses, and derive Xco - the conversion factor from CO measurements to H2 masses - within individual clouds. On average, we find that Xco = 1.2 \times 10^20 cm-2 / (K km s-1), which is consistent within our uncertainties with previously derived Galactic values as well as the value we derive for Galactic GMCs above our mass sensitivity limit. The properties of our GMCs are largely consistent with the trends observed for molecular clouds detected in the Milky Way disk, with the exception of six clouds detected within \sim400 pc of the center of NGC 6946, which exhibit larger velocity dispersions for a given size and luminosity, as has also been observed at the Galactic center.
  • Using data from the COSMOS survey, we perform the first joint analysis of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing, galaxy spatial clustering, and galaxy number densities. Carefully accounting for sample variance and for scatter between stellar and halo mass, we model all three observables simultaneously using a novel and self-consistent theoretical framework. Our results provide strong constraints on the shape and redshift evolution of the stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) from z=0.2 to z=1. At low stellar mass, we find that halo mass scales as Mh M*^0.46 and that this scaling does not evolve significantly with redshift to z=1. We show that the dark-to-stellar ratio, Mh/M*, varies from low to high masses, reaching a minimum of Mh/M*~27 at M*=4.5x10^10 Msun and Mh=1.2x10^12 Msun. This minimum is important for models of galaxy formation because it marks the mass at which the accumulated stellar growth of the central galaxy has been the most efficient. We describe the SHMR at this minimum in terms of the "pivot stellar mass", M*piv, the "pivot halo mass", Mhpiv, and the "pivot ratio", (Mh/M*)piv. Thanks to a homogeneous analysis of a single data set, we report the first detection of mass downsizing trends for both Mhpiv and M*piv. The pivot stellar mass decreases from M*piv=5.75+-0.13x10^10 Msun at z=0.88 to M*piv=3.55+-0.17x10^10 Msun at z=0.37. Intriguingly, however, the corresponding evolution of Mhpiv leaves the pivot ratio constant with redshift at (Mh/M*)piv~27. We use simple arguments to show how this result raises the possibility that star formation quenching may ultimately depend on Mh/M* and not simply Mh, as is commonly assumed. We show that simple models with such a dependence naturally lead to downsizing in the sites of star formation. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results in the context of popular quenching models, including disk instabilities and AGN feedback.
  • We present sensitive and high angular resolution CO(1-0) data obtained by the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) observations toward the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M 51. The angular resolution of 0.7" corresponds to 30 pc, which is similar to the typical size of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs), and the sensitivity is also high enough to detect typical GMCs. Within the 1' field of view centered on a spiral arm, a number of GMC-scale structures are detected as clumps. However, only a few clumps are found to be associated with each Giant Molecular Association (GMA), and more than 90% of the total flux is resolved out in our data. Considering the high sensitivity and resolution of our data, these results indicate that GMAs are not mere confusion of GMCs but plausibly smooth structures. In addition, we have found that the most massive clumps are located downstream of the spiral arm, which suggests that they are at a later stage of molecular cloud evolution across the arm and plausibly are cores of GMAs. By comparing with H-alpha and Pa-alpha images, most of these cores are found to have nearby star forming regions. We thus propose an evolutionary scenario for the interstellar medium, in which smaller molecular clouds collide to form smooth GMAs at spiral arm regions and then star formation is triggered in the GMA cores. Our new CO data have revealed the internal structure of GMAs at GMC scales, finding the most massive substructures on the downstream side of the arm in close association with the brightest H II regions.
  • We extend the Unified Radio Catalog, a catalog of sources detected by various (NVSS, FIRST, WENSS, GB6) radio surveys, and SDSS, to IR wavelengths by matching it to the IRAS Point and Faint Source catalogs. By fitting each NVSS-selected galaxy's NUV-NIR spectral energy distribution (SED) with stellar population synthesis models we add to the catalog star formation rates, stellar masses, and attenuations.We further add information about optical emission line properties for NVSS-selected galaxies with available SDSS spectroscopy. Using an NVSS 20cm (F_{1.4GHz} ge 2.5mJy) selected sample, matched to the SDSS spectroscopic ("main" galaxy and quasar) catalogs and IRAS data (0.04<z le 0.2) we perform an in depth analysis of the radio-FIR correlation for various types of galaxies, separated into i) quasars, ii) star forming, iii) composite, iv) Seyfert, v) LINER and vi) absorption line galaxies using the standard optical spectroscopic diagnostic tools. We utilize SED-based star formation rates to independently quantify the source of radio and FIR emission in our galaxies. Our results show that Seyfert galaxies have FIR/radio ratios lower than, but still within the scatter of, the canonical value due to an additional (likely AGN) contribution to their radio continuum emission. Furthermore, IR-detected absorption and LINER galaxies are on average strongly dominated by AGN activity in both their FIR and radio emission; however their average FIR/radio ratio is consistent with that expected for star forming galaxies. In summary, we find that most AGN-containing galaxies in our NVSS-IRAS-SDSS sample have FIR/radio flux ratios indistinguishable from those of the star-forming galaxies that define the radio-FIR correlation. Thus, attempts to separate AGNs from star-forming galaxies by their FIR/radio flux ratios alone can separate only a small fraction of the AGNs, such as the radio-loud quasars.
  • We present Spitzer 7-38um spectra for a 24um flux limited sample of galaxies at z~0.7 in the COSMOS field. The detailed high-quality spectra allow us to cleanly separate star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) in individual galaxies. We first decompose mid-infrared Luminosity Functions (LFs). We find that the SF 8um and 15um LFs are well described by Schechter functions. AGNs dominate the space density at high luminosities, which leads to the shallow bright-end slope of the overall mid-infrared LFs. The total infrared (8-1000um) LF from 70um selected galaxies shows a shallower bright-end slope than the bolometrically corrected SF 15um LF, owing to the intrinsic dispersion in the mid-to-far-infrared spectral energy distributions. We then study the contemporary growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes (BHs). Seven of the 31 Luminous Infrared Galaxies with Spitzer spectra host luminous AGNs, implying an AGN duty cycle of 23+/-9%. The time-averaged ratio of BH accretion rate and SF rate matches the local M_BH-M_bulge relation and the M_BH-M_host relation at z ~ 1. These results favor co-evolution scenarios in which BH growth and intense SF happen in the same event but the former spans a shorter lifetime than the latter. Finally, we compare our mid-infrared spectroscopic selection with other AGN identification methods and discuss candidate Compton-thick AGNs in the sample. While only half of the mid-infrared spectroscopically selected AGNs are detected in X-ray, ~90% of them can be identified with their near-infrared spectral indices.