• Many optimization problems can be naturally represented as (hyper) graphs, where vertices correspond to variables and edges to tasks, whose cost depends on the values of the adjacent variables. Capitalizing on the structure of the graph, suitable dynamic programming strategies can select certain orders of evaluation of the variables which guarantee to reach both an optimal solution and a minimal size of the tables computed in the optimization process. In this paper we introduce a simple algebraic specification with parallel composition and restriction whose terms up to structural axioms are the graphs mentioned above. In addition, free (unrestricted) vertices are labelled with variables, and the specification includes operations of name permutation with finite support. We show a correspondence between the well-known tree decompositions of graphs and our terms. If an axiom of scope extension is dropped, several (hierarchical) terms actually correspond to the same graph. A suitable graphical structure can be found, corresponding to every hierarchical term. Evaluating such a graphical structure in some target algebra yields a dynamic programming strategy. If the target algebra satisfies the scope extension axiom, then the result does not depend on the particular structure, but only on the original graph. We apply our approach to the parking optimization problem developed in the ASCENS e-mobility case study, in collaboration with Volkswagen. Dynamic programming evaluations are particularly interesting for autonomic systems, where actual behavior often consists of propagating local knowledge to obtain global knowledge and getting it back for local decisions.
  • Soft Constraint Logic Programming is a natural and flexible declarative programming formalism, which allows to model and solve real-life problems involving constraints of different types. In this paper, after providing a slightly more general and elegant presentation of the framework, we show how we can apply it to the e-mobility problem of coordinating electric vehicles in order to overcome both energetic and temporal constraints and so to reduce their running cost. In particular, we focus on the journey optimization sub-problem, considering sequences of trips from a user's appointment to another one. Solutions provide the best alternatives in terms of time and energy consumption, including route sequences and possible charging events.