• We present a direct measurement of the mean halo occupation distribution (HOD) of galaxies taken from the eleventh data release (DR11) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The HOD of BOSS low-redshift (LOWZ: $0.2 < z < 0.4$) and Constant-Mass (CMASS: $0.43 <z <0.7$) galaxies is inferred via their association with the dark-matter halos of 174 X-ray-selected galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS). Halo masses are determined for each galaxy cluster based on X-ray temperature measurements, and range between ${\rm log_{10}} (M_{180}/M_{\odot}) = 13-15$. Our directly measured HODs are consistent with the HOD-model fits inferred via the galaxy-clustering analyses of Parejko et al. for the BOSS LOWZ sample and White et al. for the BOSS CMASS sample. Under the simplifying assumption that the other parameters that describe the HOD hold the values measured by these authors, we have determined a best-fit alpha-index of 0.91$\pm$0.08 and $1.27^{+0.03}_{-0.04}$ for the CMASS and LOWZ HOD, respectively. These alpha-index values are consistent with those measured by White et al. and Parejko et al. In summary, our study provides independent support for the HOD models assumed during the development of the BOSS mock-galaxy catalogues that have subsequently been used to derive BOSS cosmological constraints.
  • The FourStar galaxy evolution survey (ZFOURGE) is a 45 night legacy program with the FourStar near-infrared camera on Magellan and one of the most sensitive surveys to date. ZFOURGE covers a total of $400\ \mathrm{arcmin}^2$ in cosmic fields CDFS, COSMOS and UDS, overlapping CANDELS. We present photometric catalogs comprising $>70,000$ galaxies, selected from ultradeep $K_s$-band detection images ($25.5-26.5$ AB mag, $5\sigma$, total), and $>80\%$ complete to $K_s<25.3-25.9$ AB. We use 5 near-IR medium-bandwidth filters ($J_1,J_2,J_3,H_s,H_l$) as well as broad-band $K_s$ at $1.05\ - 2.16\ \mu m$ to $25-26$ AB at a seeing of $\sim0.5$". Each field has ancillary imaging in $26-40$ filters at $0.3-8\ \mu m$. We derive photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. Comparing with spectroscopic redshifts indicates a photometric redshift uncertainty $\sigma_z={0.010,0.009}$, and 0.011 in CDFS, COSMOS, and UDS. As spectroscopic samples are often biased towards bright and blue sources, we also inspect the photometric redshift differences between close pairs of galaxies, finding $\sigma_{z,pairs}= 0.01-0.02$ at $1<z<2.5$. We quantify how $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ depends on redshift, magnitude, SED type, and the inclusion of FourStar medium bands. $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ is smallest for bright, blue star-forming samples, while red star-forming galaxies have the worst $\sigma_{z,pairs}$. Including FourStar medium bands reduces $\sigma_{z,pairs}$ by 50\% at $1.5<z<2.5$. We calculate SFRs based on ultraviolet and ultradeep far-IR $Spitzer$/MIPS and Herschel/PACS data. We derive rest-frame $U-V$ and $V-J$ colors, and illustrate how these correlate with specific SFR and dust emission to $z=3.5$. We confirm the existence of quiescent galaxies at $z\sim3$, demonstrating their SFRs are suppressed by $>\times15$.
  • We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\sigma_{\rm v}$--$T_{\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\sigma_{\rm v} \propto T^{0.86 \pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen in our data is consistent with simulations that include both feedback and radiative cooling.
  • The chameleon gravity model postulates the existence of a scalar field that couples with matter to mediate a fifth force. If it exists, this fifth force would influence the hot X-ray emitting gas filling the potential wells of galaxy clusters. However, it would not influence the clusters' weak lensing signal. Therefore, by comparing X-ray and weak lensing profiles, one can place upper limits on the strength of a fifth force. This technique has been attempted before using a single, nearby cluster (Coma, $z=0.02$). Here we apply the technique to the stacked profiles of 58 clusters at higher redshifts ($0.1<z<1.2$), including 12 new to the literature, using X-ray data from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) and weak lensing data from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). Using a multi-parameter MCMC analysis, we constrain the two chameleon gravity parameters ($\beta$ and $\phi_{\infty}$). Our fits are consistent with general relativity, not requiring a fifth force. In the special case of $f(R)$ gravity (where $\beta = \sqrt{1/6}$), we set an upper limit on the background field amplitude today of $|f_{\rm{R0}}| < 6 \times 10^{-5}$ (95% CL). This is one of the strongest constraints to date on $|f_{\rm{R0}}|$ on cosmological scales. We hope to improve this constraint in future by extending the study to hundreds of clusters using data from the Dark Energy Survey.
  • We study the rest-frame ultra-violet sizes of massive (~0.8 x 10^11 M_Sun) galaxies at 3.4<z<4.2, selected from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE), by fitting single Sersic profiles to HST/WFC3/F160W images from the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). Massive quiescent galaxies are very compact, with a median circularized half-light radius r_e = 0.63 +/- 0.18 kpc. Removing 5/16 (31%) sources with signs of AGN activity does not change the result. Star-forming galaxies have r_e = 2.0 +/- 0.60 kpc, 3.2 +/- 1.3 x larger than quiescent galaxies. Quiescent galaxies at z~4 are on average 6.0 +\- 0.17 x smaller than at z~0 and 1.9 +/- 0.7 x smaller than at z~2. Star-forming galaxies of the same stellar mass are 2.4 +/- 0.7 x smaller than at z~0. Overall, the size evolution at 0<z<4 is well described by a powerlaw, with r_e = 5.08 +/- 0.28 (1+z)^(-1.44+/-0.08) kpc for quiescent and r_e = 6.02 +/- 0.28 (1+z)^(-0.72+/-0.05) kpc for star-forming galaxies. Compact star-forming galaxies are rare in our sample: we find only 1/14 (7%) with r_e / (M / 10^11 M_Sun)^0.75 < 1.5, whereas 13/16 (81%) of the quiescent galaxies is compact. The number density of compact quiescent galaxies at z~4 is 1.8 +/- 0.8 x 10^-5 Mpc^-3 and increases rapidly, by >5 x, between 2<z<4. The paucity of compact star-forming galaxies at z~4 and their large rest-frame ultra-violet median sizes suggest that the formation phase of compact cores is very short and/or highly dust obscured.
  • We study the statistical distribution of satellites around star-forming and quiescent central galaxies at 1<z<3 using imaging from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) and the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). The deep near-IR data select satellites down to $\log(M/M_\odot)>9$ at z<3. The radial satellite distribution around centrals is consistent with a projected NFW profile. Massive quiescent centrals, $\log(M/M_\odot)>10.78$, have $\sim$2 times the number of satellites compared to star-forming centrals with a significance of 2.7$\sigma$ even after accounting for differences in the centrals' stellar-mass distributions. We find no statistical difference in the satellite distributions of intermediate-mass quiescent and star-forming centrals, $10.48<\log(M/M_\odot)<10.78$. Comparing to the Guo2011 semi-analytic model, the excess number of satellites indicates that quiescent centrals have halo masses 0.3 dex larger than star-forming centrals, even when the stellar-mass distributions are fixed. We use a simple toy model that relates halo mass and quenching, which roughly reproduces the observed quenched fractions and the differences in halo mass between star-forming and quenched galaxies only if galaxies have a quenching probability that increases with halo mass from $\sim$0 for $\log(M_h/M_\odot)\sim$11 to $\sim$1 for $\log(M_h/M_\odot)\sim$13.5. A single halo-mass quenching threshold is unable to reproduce the quiescent fraction and satellite distribution of centrals. Therefore, while halo quenching may be an important mechanism, it is unlikely to be the only factor driving quenching. It remains unclear why a high fraction of centrals remain star-forming even in relatively massive halos.
  • Our understanding of the redshift $z>3$ galaxy population relies largely on samples selected using the popular "dropout" technique, typically consisting of UV-bright galaxies with blue colors and prominent Lyman breaks. As it is currently unknown if these galaxies are representative of the massive galaxy population, we here use the FourStar Galaxy Evolution (ZFOURGE) Survey to create a stellar mass-limited sample at $z=3-4$. Uniquely, ZFOURGE uses deep near-infrared medium-bandwidth filters to derive accurate photometric redshifts and stellar population properties. The mass-complete sample consists of 57 galaxies with log M $>10.6$, reaching below $M^{\star}$ at $z=3-4$. On average, the massive $z=3-4$ galaxies are extremely faint in the observed optical with median $R_{tot}^{AB}=27.48\pm0.41$ (restframe $M_{1700}=-18.05\pm0.37$). They lie far below the UV luminosity-stellar mass relation for Lyman break galaxies and are about $\sim100\times$ fainter at the same mass. The massive galaxies are red ($R-Ks_{AB}=3.9\pm0.2$; restframe UV-slope $\beta=-0.2\pm0.3$) likely from dust or old stellar ages. We classify the galaxy SEDs by their restframe $U-V$ and $V-J$ colors and find a diverse population: $46^{+6+10}_{-6-17}$% of the massive galaxies are quiescent, $54^{+8+17}_{-8-10}$% are dusty star-forming galaxies, and only $14^{+3+10}_{-3-4}$% resemble luminous blue star forming Lyman break galaxies. This study clearly demonstrates an inherent diversity among massive galaxies at higher redshift than previously known. Furthermore,we uncover a reservoir of dusty star-forming galaxies with $4\times$ lower specific star-formation rates compared to submillimeter-selected starbursts at $z>3$. With $5\times$ higher numbers, the dusty galaxies may represent a more typical mode of star formation compared to submillimeter-bright starbursts.
  • We report the likely identification of a substantial population of massive M~10^11M_Sun galaxies at z~4 with suppressed star formation rates (SFRs), selected on rest-frame optical to near-IR colors from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey. The observed spectral energy distributions show pronounced breaks, sampled by a set of near-IR medium-bandwidth filters, resulting in tightly constrained photometric redshifts. Fitting stellar population models suggests large Balmer/4000AA breaks, relatively old stellar populations, large stellar masses and low SFRs, with a median specific SFR of 2.9+/-1.8 x 10^-11/yr. Ultradeep Herschel/PACS 100micron, 160micron and Spitzer/MIPS 24micron data reveal no dust-obscured SFR activity for 15/19 (79%) galaxies. Two far-IR detected galaxies are obscured QSOs. Stacking the far-IR undetected galaxies yields no detection, consistent with the SED fit, indicating independently that the average specific SFR is at least 10x smaller than of typical star-forming galaxies at z~4. Assuming all far-IR undetected galaxies are indeed quiescent, the volume density is 1.8+/-0.7 x 10^-5Mpc^-3 to a limit of log10M/M_Sun>10.6, which is 10x and 80x lower than at z = 2 and z = 0.1. They comprise a remarkably high fraction (~35%) of z~4 massive galaxies, suggesting that suppression of star formation was efficient even at very high redshift. Given the average stellar age of 0.8Gyr and stellar mass of 0.8x10^11M_Sun, the galaxies likely started forming stars before z =5, with SFRs well in excess of 100M_Sun/yr, far exceeding that of similarly abundant UV-bright galaxies at z>4. This suggests that most of the star-formation in the progenitors of quiescent z~4 galaxies was obscured by dust.
  • Using observations from the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE), we obtain the deepest measurements to date of the galaxy stellar mass function at 0.5 < z < 2.5. ZFOURGE provides well-constrained photometric redshifts made possible through deep medium-bandwidth imaging at 1-2um . We combine this with HST imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS), allowing for the efficient selection of both blue and red galaxies down to stellar masses ~10^9.5 Msol at z ~ 2.5. The total surveyed area is 316 arcmin^2 distributed over three independent fields. We supplement these data with the wider and shallower NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS) to provide stronger constraints at high masses. Several studies at z<=1 have revealed a steepening of the slope at the low-mass end of the stellar mass function (SMF), leading to an upturn at masses <10^10 Msol that is not well-described by a standard single-Schechter function. We find evidence that this feature extends to at least z ~ 2, and that it can be found in both the star-forming and quiescent populations individually. The characteristic mass (M*) and slope at the lowest masses (alpha) of a double-Schechter function fit to the SMF stay roughly constant at Log(M/Msol) ~ 10.65 and ~-1.5 respectively. The SMF of star-forming galaxies has evolved primarily in normalization, while the change in shape is relatively minor. This is not the case for quiescent galaxies: the depth of our imaging allows us to show for the first time significantly more evolution at Log(M/Msol) < 10.5 than at higher masses. We find that the total mass density (down to 10^9 Msol) in star-forming galaxies has increased by a factor of ~2.2 since z ~ 2.5, whereas in quiescent galaxies it has increased by a factor of ~12 .
  • This paper presents both the result of a search for fossil systems (FSs) within the XMM Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the results of a study of the stellar mass assembly and stellar populations of their fossil galaxies. In total, 17 groups and clusters are identified at z < 0.25 with large magnitude gaps between the first and fourth brightest galaxies. All the information necessary to classify these systems as fossils is provided. For both groups and clusters, the total and fractional luminosity of the brightest galaxy is positively correlated with the magnitude gap. The brightest galaxies in FSs (called fossil galaxies) have stellar populations and star formation histories which are similar to normal brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). However, at fixed group/cluster mass, the stellar masses of the fossil galaxies are larger compared to normal BCGs, a fact that holds true over a wide range of group/cluster masses. Moreover, the fossil galaxies are found to contain a significant fraction of the total optical luminosity of the group/cluster within 0.5R200, as much as 85%, compared to the non-fossils, which can have as little as 10%. Our results suggest that FSs formed early and in the highest density regions of the universe and that fossil galaxies represent the end products of galaxy mergers in groups and clusters. The online FS catalog can be found at http://www.astro.ljmu.ac.uk/~xcs/Harrison2012/XCSFSCat.html.
  • We measure the evolution of the X-ray luminosity-temperature (L_X-T) relation since z~1.5 using a sample of 211 serendipitously detected galaxy clusters with spectroscopic redshifts drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey first data release (XCS-DR1). This is the first study spanning this redshift range using a single, large, homogeneous cluster sample. Using an orthogonal regression technique, we find no evidence for evolution in the slope or intrinsic scatter of the relation since z~1.5, finding both to be consistent with previous measurements at z~0.1. However, the normalisation is seen to evolve negatively with respect to the self-similar expectation: we find E(z)^{-1} L_X = 10^{44.67 +/- 0.09} (T/5)^{3.04 +/- 0.16} (1+z)^{-1.5 +/- 0.5}, which is within 2 sigma of the zero evolution case. We see milder, but still negative, evolution with respect to self-similar when using a bisector regression technique. We compare our results to numerical simulations, where we fit simulated cluster samples using the same methods used on the XCS data. Our data favour models in which the majority of the excess entropy required to explain the slope of the L_X-T relation is injected at high redshift. Simulations in which AGN feedback is implemented using prescriptions from current semi-analytic galaxy formation models predict positive evolution of the normalisation, and differ from our data at more than 5 sigma. This suggests that more efficient feedback at high redshift may be needed in these models.
  • We present a list of 15 clusters of galaxies, serendipitously detected by the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS), that have a high probability of detection by the Planck satellite. Three of them already appear in the Planck Early Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (ESZ) catalogue. The estimation of the Planck detection probability assumes the flat Lambda cold dark matter (LambdaCDM) cosmology most compatible with 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) data. It takes into account the XCS selection function and Planck sensitivity, as well as the covariance of the cluster X-ray luminosity, temperature, and integrated comptonization parameter, as a function of cluster mass and redshift, determined by the Millennium Gas Simulations. We also characterize the properties of the galaxy clusters in the final data release of the XCS that we expect Planck will have detected by the end of its extended mission. Finally, we briefly discuss possible joint applications of the XCS and Planck data.
  • The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we present the first data release from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS-DR1). This consists of 503 optically confirmed, serendipitously detected, X-ray clusters. Of these clusters, 255 are new to the literature and 356 are new X-ray discoveries. We present 464 clusters with a redshift estimate (0.06 < z < 1.46), including 261 clusters with spectroscopic redshifts. In addition, we have measured X-ray temperatures (Tx) for 402 clusters (0.4 < Tx < 14.7 keV). We highlight seven interesting subsamples of XCS-DR1 clusters: (i) 10 clusters at high redshift (z > 1.0, including a new spectroscopically-confirmed cluster at z = 1.01); (ii) 67 clusters with high Tx (> 5 keV); (iii) 131 clusters/groups with low Tx (< 2 keV); (iv) 27 clusters with measured Tx values in the SDSS `Stripe 82' co-add region; (v) 78 clusters with measured Tx values in the Dark Energy Survey region; (vi) 40 clusters detected with sufficient counts to permit mass measurements (under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium); (vii) 105 clusters that can be used for applications such as the derivation of cosmological parameters and the measurement of cluster scaling relations. The X-ray analysis methodology used to construct and analyse the XCS-DR1 cluster sample has been presented in a companion paper, Lloyd-Davies et al. (2010).
  • The XMM Cluster Survey (XCS) is a serendipitous search for galaxy clusters using all publicly available data in the XMM-Newton Science Archive. Its main aims are to measure cosmological parameters and trace the evolution of X-ray scaling relations. In this paper we describe the data processing methodology applied to the 5,776 XMM observations used to construct the current XCS source catalogue. A total of 3,675 > 4-sigma cluster candidates with > 50 background-subtracted X-ray counts are extracted from a total non-overlapping area suitable for cluster searching of 410 deg^2. Of these, 993 candidates are detected with > 300 background-subtracted X-ray photon counts, and we demonstrate that robust temperature measurements can be obtained down to this count limit. We describe in detail the automated pipelines used to perform the spectral and surface brightness fitting for these candidates, as well as to estimate redshifts from the X-ray data alone. A total of 587 (122) X-ray temperatures to a typical accuracy of < 40 (< 10) per cent have been measured to date. We also present the methodology adopted for determining the selection function of the survey, and show that the extended source detection algorithm is robust to a range of cluster morphologies by inserting mock clusters derived from hydrodynamical simulations into real XMM images. These tests show that the simple isothermal beta-profiles is sufficient to capture the essential details of the cluster population detected in the archival XMM observations. The redshift follow-up of the XCS cluster sample is presented in a companion paper, together with a first data release of 503 optically-confirmed clusters.
  • We use Chandra X-ray and Spitzer infrared observations to explore the AGN and starburst populations of XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.46, one of the most distant spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters known. The high resolution X-ray imaging reveals that the cluster emission is contaminated by point sources that were not resolved in XMM observations of the system, and have the effect of hardening the spectrum, leading to the previously reported temperature for this system being overestimated. From a joint spectroscopic analysis of the Chandra and XMM data, the cluster is found to have temperature T=4.1_-0.9^+0.6 keV and luminosity L_X=(2.92_-0.35^+0.24)x10^44 erg/s extrapolated to a radius of 2 Mpc. As a result of this revised analysis, the cluster is found to lie on the sigma_v-T relation, but the cluster remains less luminous than would be expected from self-similar evolution of the local L_X-T relation. Two of the newly discovered X-ray AGN are cluster members, while a third object, which is also a prominent 24 micron source, is found to have properties consistent with it being a high redshift, highly obscured object in the background. We find a total of eight >5 sigma 24 micron sources associated with cluster members (four spectroscopically confirmed, and four selected using photometric redshifts), and one additional 24 micron source with two possible optical/near-IR counterparts that may be associated with the cluster. Examining the IRAC colors of these sources, we find one object is likely to be an AGN. Assuming that the other 24 micron sources are powered by star formation, their infrared luminosities imply star formation rates ~100 M_sun/yr. We find that three of these sources are located at projected distances of <250 kpc from the cluster center, suggesting that a large amount of star formation may be taking place in the cluster core, in contrast to clusters at low redshift.
  • We forecast the constraints on the values of sigma_8, Omega_m, and cluster scaling relation parameters which we expect to obtain from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS). We assume a flat Lambda-CDM Universe and perform a Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis of the evolution of the number density of galaxy clusters that takes into account a detailed simulated selection function. Comparing our current observed number of clusters shows good agreement with predictions. We determine the expected degradation of the constraints as a result of self-calibrating the luminosity-temperature relation (with scatter), including temperature measurement errors, and relying on photometric methods for the estimation of galaxy cluster redshifts. We examine the effects of systematic errors in scaling relation and measurement error assumptions. Using only (T,z) self-calibration, we expect to measure Omega_m to +-0.03 (and Omega_Lambda to the same accuracy assuming flatness), and sigma_8 to +-0.05, also constraining the normalization and slope of the luminosity-temperature relation to +-6 and +-13 per cent (at 1sigma) respectively in the process. Self-calibration fails to jointly constrain the scatter and redshift evolution of the luminosity-temperature relation significantly. Additional archival and/or follow-up data will improve on this. We do not expect measurement errors or imperfect knowledge of their distribution to degrade constraints significantly. Scaling-relation systematics can easily lead to cosmological constraints 2sigma or more away from the fiducial model. Our treatment is the first exact treatment to this level of detail, and introduces a new `smoothed ML' estimate of expected constraints.
  • The current consensus is that galaxies begin as small density fluctuations in the early Universe and grow by in situ star formation and hierarchical merging. Stars begin to form relatively quickly in sub-galactic sized building blocks called haloes which are subsequently assembled into galaxies. However, exactly when this assembly takes place is a matter of some debate. Here we report that the stellar masses of brightest cluster galaxies, which are the most luminous objects emitting stellar light, some 9 billion years ago are not significantly different from their stellar masses today. Brightest cluster galaxies are almost fully assembled 4-5 Gyrs after the Big Bang, having grown to more than 90% of their final stellar mass by this time. Our data conflict with the most recent galaxy formation models based on the largest simulations of dark matter halo development. These models predict protracted formation of brightest cluster galaxies over a Hubble time, with only 22% of the stellar mass assembled at the epoch probed by our sample. Our findings suggest a new picture in which brightest cluster galaxies experience an early period of rapid growth rather than prolonged hierarchical assembly.
  • We present a study of the morphological fractions and color-magnitude relation in the most distant X-ray selected galaxy cluster currently known, XMMXCS J2215.9-1738 at z=1.46, using a combination of optical imaging data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys, and infrared data from the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph, mounted on the 8.2m Subaru telescope. We find that the morphological mix of the cluster galaxy population is similar to clusters at z~1: approximately ~62% of the galaxies identified as likely cluster members are ellipticals or S0s; and ~38% are spirals or irregulars. We measure the color-magnitude relations for the early type galaxies, finding that the slope in the z_850-J relation is consistent with that measured in the Coma cluster, some ~9 Gyr earlier, although the uncertainty is large. In contrast, the measured intrinsic scatter about the color-magnitude relation is more than three times the value measured in Coma, after conversion to rest frame U-V. From comparison with stellar population synthesis models, the intrinsic scatter measurements imply mean luminosity weighted ages for the early type galaxies in J2215.9-1738 of ~3 Gyr, corresponding to the major epoch of star formation coming to an end at z_f = 3-5. We find that the cluster exhibits evidence of the `downsizing' phenomenon: the fraction of faint cluster members on the red sequence expressed using the Dwarf-to-Giant Ratio (DGR) is 0.32+/-0.18. This is consistent with extrapolation of the redshift evolution of the DGR seen in cluster samples at z < 1. In contrast to observations of some other z > 1 clusters, we find a lack of very bright galaxies within the cluster.