• Cosmic rays are an important tool to study dark matter annihilation in our Galaxy. Recently, a possible hint for dark matter annihilation was found in the antiproton spectrum measured by AMS-02, even though the result might be affected by theoretical uncertainties. A complementary way to test its dark matter interpretation would be the observation of low-energy antinuclei in cosmic rays. We determine the chances to observe antideuterons with GAPS and AMS-02, and the implications for the ongoing AMS-02 antihelium searches. We find that the corresponding antideuteron signal is within the GAPS and AMS-02 detection potential. If, more conservatively, the putative signal was considered as an upper limit on DM annihilation, our results would indicate the highest possible fluxes for antideuterons and antihelium compatible with current antiproton data.
  • The observation of GeV neutrinos coming from the Sun would be an unmistakable signal of dark matter. Current neutrino detectors have so far failed to detect such a signal, however, and bounds from direct and indirect dark matter searches may significantly restrict the possibility of observing it in future experiments such as Hyper-Kamiokande or IceCube-Gen2. In this work, we assess in the light of current data and of expected experimental sensitivities, the prospects for the detection of a neutrino signal from dark matter annihilations in the Sun. To be as general as possible, equilibrium between the capture and the annihilation rates in the Sun is not assumed in our analysis; instead, the dark matter scattering and annihilation cross sections are taken as free and independent parameters. We consider capture via both spin-dependent and spin-independent interactions, and annihilations into three representative final states: $b\bar b$, $W^+W^-$, and $\tau^+\tau^-$. We find that when the capture in the Sun is dominated by spin-independent interactions, current direct detection bounds already preclude the observation of a neutrino signal in future experiments. For capture via spin-dependent interactions, a strong complementarity is observed, over most of the parameter space, between future neutrino detectors and planned direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments, such as PICO-500 and CTA. In this case, we also identify some regions of the parameter space that can be probed, via the neutrino flux from the Sun, only by future neutrino experiments.
  • We measure the cross-correlation between Fermi-LAT gamma-ray photons and over 1000 deg$^2$ of weak lensing data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), the Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), and the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). We present the first measurement of tomographic weak lensing cross-correlations and the first application of spectral binning to cross-correlations between gamma rays and weak lensing. The measurements are performed using an angular power spectrum estimator while the covariance is estimated using an analytical prescription. We verify the accuracy of our covariance estimate by comparing it to two internal covariance estimators. Based on the non-detection of a cross-correlation signal, we derive constraints on weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. We compute exclusion limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section $\langle\sigma_\rm{ann} v \rangle$, decay rate $\Gamma_\rm{dec}$, and particle mass $m_\rm{DM}$. We find that in the absence of a cross-correlation signal, tomography does not significantly improve the constraining power of the analysis. Assuming a strong contribution to the gamma-ray flux due to small-scale clustering of dark matter and accounting for known astrophysical sources of gamma rays, we exclude the thermal relic cross-section for particle masses of $m_\rm{DM}\lesssim 20$ GeV.
  • The flux of positrons and electrons ($e^+ + e^-$) has been measured by the $Fermi$ Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the energy range between 7 GeV and 2 TeV. We discuss a number of interpretations of Pass 8 $Fermi$-LAT $e^+ + e^-$ spectrum, combining electron and positron emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), or produced by the collision of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium. We find that the $Fermi$-LAT spectrum is compatible with the sum of electrons from a smooth SNR population, positrons from cataloged PWNe, and a secondary component. If we include in our analysis constraints from AMS-02 positron spectrum, we obtain a slightly worse fit to the $e^+ + e^-$ $Fermi$-LAT spectrum, depending on the propagation model. As an additional scenario, we replace the smooth SNR component within 0.7 kpc with the { individual sources} found in Green's catalog of Galactic SNRs. We find that separate consideration of far and near sources helps to reproduce the $e^+ + e^-$ $Fermi$-LAT spectrum. However, we show that the fit degrades when the radio constraints on the positron emission from Vela SNR (which is the main contributor at high energies) are taken into account. We find that a break in the power-law injection spectrum at about 100 GeV can also reproduce the measured $e^+ + e^-$ spectrum} and, among the cosmic-ray propagation models that we consider, no reasonable break of the power-law dependence of the diffusion coefficient can modify the electron flux enough to reproduce the observed shape.
  • Recently, a new measurement of the auto- and cross-correlation angular power spectrum (APS) of the isotropic gamma-ray background was performed, based on 81 months of data of the Fermi Large-Area Telescope (LAT). Here, we fit, for the first time, the new APS data with a model describing the emission of unresolved blazars. These sources are expected to dominate the anisotropy signal. The model we employ in our analysis reproduces well the blazars resolved by Fermi LAT. When considering the APS obtained by masking the sources in the 3FGL catalogue, we find that unresolved blazars under-produce the measured APS below $\sim$1 GeV. Contrary to past results, this suggests the presence of a new contribution to the low-energy APS, with a significance of, at least, 5$\sigma$. The excess can be ascribed to a new class of faint gamma-ray emitters. If we consider the APS obtained by masking the sources in the 2FGL catalogue, there is no under-production of the APS below 1 GeV, but the new source class is still preferred over the blazars-only scenario (with a significance larger than 10$\sigma$). The properties of the new source class and the level of anisotropies induced in the isotropic gamma-ray background are the same, independent of the APS data used. In particular, the new gamma-ray emitters must have a soft energy spectrum, with a spectral index ranging, approximately, from 2.7 to 3.2. This complicates their interpretation in terms of known sources, since, normally, star-forming and radio galaxies are observed with a harder spectrum. The new source class identified here is also expected to contribute significantly to the intensity of the isotropic gamma-ray background.
  • We report the detection of a cross-correlation signal between {\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope diffuse gamma-ray maps and catalogs of clusters. In our analysis, we considered three different catalogs: WHL12, redMaPPer and PlanckSZ. They all show a positive correlation with different amplitudes, related to the average mass of the objects in each catalog, which also sets the catalog bias. The signal detection is confirmed by the results of a stacking analysis. The cross-correlation signal extends to rather large angular scales, around 1 degree, that correspond, at the typical redshift of the clusters in these catalogs, to a few to tens of Mpc, i.e. the typical scale-length of the large scale structures in the Universe. Most likely this signal is contributed by the cumulative emission from AGNs associated to the filamentary structures that converge toward the high peaks of the matter density field in which galaxy clusters reside. In addition, our analysis reveals the presence of a second component, more compact in size and compatible with a point-like emission from within individual clusters. At present, we cannot distinguish between the two most likely interpretations for such a signal, i.e. whether it is produced by AGNs inside clusters or if it is a diffuse gamma-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium. We argue that this latter, intriguing, hypothesis might be tested by applying this technique to a low redshift large mass cluster sample.
  • We compare the measured angular cross-correlation between the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sky and catalogues of extra-galactic objects with the expected signal induced by weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter (DM). We include a detailed description of the contribution of astrophysical gamma-ray emitters such as blazars, misaligned AGN and star forming galaxies, and perform a global fit to the measured cross-correlation. Five catalogues are considered: SDSS-DR6 quasars, 2MASS galaxies, NVSS radio galaxies, SDSS-DR8 Luminous Red Galaxies and SDSS-DR8 main galaxy sample. To model the cross-correlation signal we use the halo occupation distribution formalism to estimate the number of galaxies of a given catalogue in DM halos and their spatial correlation properties. We discuss uncertainties in the predicted cross-correlation signal arising from the DM clustering and WIMP microscopic properties, which set the DM gamma-ray emission. The use of different catalogues probing objects at different redshifts reduces significantly, though not completely, the degeneracy among the different gamma-ray components. We find that the presence of a significant WIMP DM signal is allowed by the data but not significantly preferred by the fit, although this is mainly due to a degeneracy with the misaligned AGN component. With modest substructure boost, the sensitivity of this method excludes thermal annihilation cross sections at 95% C.L. for WIMP masses up to few tens of GeV. Constraining the low-redshift properties of astrophysical populations with future data will further improve the sensitivity to DM.
  • Galactic Dark Matter (DM) annihilations can produce cosmic-ray anti-nuclei via the nuclear coalescence of the anti-protons and anti-neutrons originated directly from the annihilation process. Since anti-deuterons have been shown to offer a distinctive DM signal, with potentially good prospects of detection in large portions of the DM-particle parameter space, we explore here the production of heavier anti-nuclei, specifically anti-helium. Even more than for anti-deuterons, the DM-produced anti-He flux can be mostly prominent over the astrophysical anti-He background at low kinetic energies, typically below 3-5 GeV/n. However, the larger number of anti-nucleons involved in the formation process makes the anti-He flux extremely small. We therefore explore, for a few DM benchmark cases, whether the yield is sufficient to allow for anti-He detection in current-generation experiments, such as AMS-02. We account for the uncertainties due to the propagation in the Galaxy and to the uncertain details of the coalescence process, and we consider the constraints already imposed by anti-proton searches. We find that only for very optimistic configurations it might be possible to achieve detection with current generation detectors. We estimate that, in more realistic configurations, an increase in experimental sensitivity at low-kinetic energies of about a factor of 500-1000 would allow to start probing DM through the rare cosmic anti-He production.
  • The source-count distribution as a function of their flux, dN/dS, is one of the main quantities characterizing gamma-ray source populations. We employ statistical properties of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) photon counts map to measure the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray sky at high latitudes (|b|>30 deg) between 1 GeV and 10 GeV. We present a new method, generalizing the use of standard pixel-count statistics, to decompose the total observed gamma-ray emission into (a) point-source contributions, (b) the Galactic foreground contribution, and (c) a truly diffuse isotropic background contribution. Using the 6-year Fermi-LAT data set (P7REP), we show that the dN/dS distribution in the regime of so far undetected point sources can be consistently described with a power law of index between 1.9 and 2.0. We measure dN/dS down to an integral flux of ~2x10^{-11} cm^{-2}s^{-1}, improving beyond the 3FGL catalog detection limit by about one order of magnitude. The overall dN/dS distribution is consistent with a broken power law, with a break at 2.1^{+1.0}_{-1.3}x10^{-8} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. The power-law index n_1=3.1^{+0.7}_{-0.5} for bright sources above the break hardens to n_2=1.97+-0.03 for fainter sources below the break. A possible second break of the dN/dS distribution is constrained to be at fluxes below 6.4x10^{-11} cm^{-2}s^{-1} at 95% confidence level. The high-latitude gamma-ray sky between 1 GeV and 10 GeV is shown to be composed of ~25% point sources, ~69.3% diffuse Galactic foreground emission, and ~6% isotropic diffuse background.
  • Statistical properties of photon count maps have recently been proven as a new tool to study the composition of the gamma-ray sky with high precision. We employ the 1-point probability distribution function of 6 years of Fermi-LAT data to measure the source-count distribution dN/dS and the diffuse components of the high-latitude gamma-ray sky as a function of energy. To that aim, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in five adjacent energy bands between 1 GeV and 171 GeV. It is demonstrated that the source-count distribution as a function of flux is compatible with a broken power law up to energies of ~50 GeV. The index below the break is between 1.95 and 2.0. For higher energies, a simple power-law fits the data, with an index of 2.2^{+0.7}_{-0.3} in the energy band between 50 GeV and 171 GeV. Upper limits on further possible breaks as well as the angular power of unresolved sources are derived. We find that point-source populations probed by this method can explain 83^{+7}_{-13}% (81^{+52}_{-19}%) of the extragalactic gamma-ray background between 1.04 GeV and 1.99 GeV (50 GeV and 171 GeV). The method has excellent capabilities for constraining the gamma-ray luminosity function and the spectra of unresolved blazars.
  • We perform a detailed quantitative analysis of the recent AMS-02 electron and positron data. We investigate the interplay between the emission from primary astrophysical sources, namely Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, and the contribution from a dark matter annihilation or decay signal. Our aim is to assess the information that can be derived on dark matter properties when both dark matter and primary astrophysical sources are assumed to jointly contribute to the leptonic observables measured by the AMS-02 experiment. We investigate both the possibility to set robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation/decay rate and the possibility to look for dark matter signals within realistic models that take into account the full complexity of the astrophysical background. Our results show that AMS-02 data enable to probe efficiently vast regions of the dark matter parameter space and, in some cases, to set constraints on the dark matter annihilation/decay rate that are comparable or even stronger than the ones derived from other indirect detection channels.
  • We investigate a phenomenological non-gravitational coupling between dark energy and dark matter, where the interaction in the dark sector is parameterized as an energy transfer either from dark matter to dark energy or the opposite. The models are constrained by a whole host of updated cosmological data: cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies and polarization, high-redshift supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing. Both models are found to be compatible with all cosmological observables, but in the case where dark matter decays into dark energy, the tension with the independent determinations of $H_0$ and $\sigma_8$, already present for standard cosmology, increases: this model in fact predicts lower $H_0$ and higher $\sigma_8$, mostly as a consequence of the higher amount of dark matter at early times, leading to a stronger clustering during the evolution. Instead, when dark matter is fed by dark energy, the reconstructed values of $H_0$ and $\sigma_8$ nicely agree with their local determinations, with a full reconciliation between high- and low-redshift observations. A non-zero coupling between dark energy and dark matter, with an energy flow from the former to the latter, appears therefore to be in better agreement with cosmological data.
  • We recently proposed to cross-correlate the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background with the gravitational lensing signal of cosmic shear. This represents a novel and promising strategy to search for annihilating or decaying particle dark matter (DM) candidates. In the present work, we demonstrate the potential of a tomographic-spectral approach: measuring the cross-correlation in separate bins of redshift and energy significantly improves the sensitivity to a DM signal. Indeed, the technique proposed here takes advantage of the different scaling of the astrophysical and DM components with redshift and, simultaneously, of their different energy spectra and different angular extensions. The sensitivity to a particle DM signal is extremely promising even when the DM-induced emission is quite faint. We first quantify the prospects of detecting DM by cross-correlating the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) diffuse gamma-ray background with the cosmic shear expected from the Dark Energy Survey. Under the hypothesis of a significant subhalo boost, such a measurement can deliver a 5-sigma detection of DM, if the DM particle is lighter than 300 GeV and has a thermal annihilation rate. We then forecast the capability of the European Space Agency Euclid satellite (whose launch is planned for 2020), in combination with an hypothetical future gamma-ray detector with slightly improved specifications compared to current telescopes. We predict that the cross-correlation of their data will allow a measurement of the DM mass with an uncertainty of a factor of 1.5-2, even for moderate subhalo boosts, for DM masses up to few hundreds of GeV and thermal annihilation rates.
  • If dark matter (DM) is composed by particles which are non-gravitationally coupled to ordinary matter, their annihilations or decays in cosmic structures can result in detectable radiation. We show that the most powerful technique to detect a particle DM signal outside the Local Group is to study the angular cross-correlation of non-gravitational signals with low-redshift gravitational probes. This method allows to enhance signal-to-noise from the regions of the Universe where the DM-induced emission is preferentially generated. We demonstrate the power of this approach by focusing on GeV-TeV DM and on the recent cross-correlation analysis between the 2MASS galaxy catalogue and the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray maps. We show that this technique is more sensitive than other extragalactic gamma-ray probes, such as the energy spectrum and angular autocorrelation of the extragalactic background, and emission from clusters of galaxies. Intriguingly, we find that the measured cross-correlation can be well fitted by a DM component, with thermal annihilation cross section and mass between 10 and 100 GeV, depending on the small-scale DM properties and gamma-ray production mechanism. This solicits further data collection and dedicated analyses.
  • The recent discovery of B-modes in the polarization pattern of the Cosmic Microwave Background by the BICEP2 experiment has important implications for neutrino physics. We revisit cosmological bounds on light sterile neutrinos and show that they are compatible with all current cosmological data provided that the mass is relatively low. Using CMB data, including BICEP-2, we find an upper bound of $m_s < 0.85$ eV ($2\sigma$ Confidence Level). This bound is strengthened to 0.48 eV when HST measurements of $H_0$ are included. However, the inclusion of SZ cluster data from the Planck mission and weak gravitational measurements from the CFHTLenS project favours a non-zero sterile neutrino mass of $0.44^{+0.11}_{-0.16}$ eV. Short baseline neutrino oscillations, on the other hand, indicate a new mass state around 1.2 eV. This mass is highly incompatible with cosmological data if the sterile neutrino is fully thermalised ($\Delta \chi^2>10$). However, if the sterile neutrino only partly thermalises it can be compatible with all current data, both cosmological and terrestrial.
  • We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission is reasonable, extragalactic sources well below the current experimental threshold seem to account for the majority of the brightness of the extragalactic radio sky.
  • Anisotropies in the electromagnetic emission produced by dark matter annihilation or decay in the extragalactic sky are a recent tool in the quest for a particle dark matter evidence. We review the formalism to compute the two-point angular power spectrum in the halo-model approach and discuss the features and the relative size of the various auto- and cross-correlation signals that can be envisaged for anisotropy studies. From the side of particle dark matter signals, we consider the full multi-wavelength spectrum, from the radio emission to X-ray and gamma-ray productions. We discuss the angular power spectra of the auto-correlation of each of these signals and of the cross-correlation between any pair of them. We then extend the search to comprise specific gravitational tracers of dark matter distribution in the Universe: weak-lensing cosmic shear, large-scale-structure matter distribution and CMB-lensing. We have shown that cross-correlating a multi-wavelength dark matter signal (which is a direct manifestation of its particle physics nature) with a gravitational tracer (which is a manifestation of the presence of large amounts of unseen matter in the Universe) may offer a promising tool to demonstrate that what we call dark matter is indeed formed by elementary particles.
  • Cosmology and short baseline neutrino oscillation data both hint at the existence of light sterile neutrinos with masses in the 1 eV range. Here we perform a detailed analysis of the sterile neutrino scenario using both cosmological and SBL data. We have additionally considered the possibility that the extra neutrino degrees of freedom are not fully thermalised in the early universe. Even when analyzing only cosmological data we find a preference for the existence of massive sterile neutrinos in both (3+1) and (3+2) scenarios, and with the inclusion of SBL data the evidence is formally at the 3.3sigma level in the case of a (3+1) model. Interestingly, cosmological and SBL data both point to the same mass scale of approximately 1 eV. In the (3+1) framework WMAP9+SPT provide a value of the sterile mass eigenstate m_4 = (1.72 \pm 0.65) eV: this result is strenghtened by adding the prior from SBL posterior to m_4 = (1.27 \pm 0.12) eV (m_4 = (1.23 \pm 0.13) eV when SDSS is also considered in the cosmological analysis). In the (3+2) scheme, two additional, non--fully thermalized, neutrinos are compatible with the whole set of cosmological and SBL data, leading to mass values of m_4 = (0.95 \pm 0.30) eV and m_5 = (1.59 \pm 0.49) eV. The inclusion of Planck data does not change our considerations about the mass scale; concerning the extra neutrino degrees of freedom, invoking a partial thermalisation the 3+1 model is still consistent with the latest data.
  • Recent results from short--baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy measurements suggest the presence of additional sterile neutrinos. In this paper we properly combine these data sets to derive bounds on the sterile neutrino masses in the 3+1 and 3+2 frameworks, finding a potentially good agreement between the two datasets. However, when galaxy clustering is included in the analysis a tension between the oscillation and cosmological data is clearly present.
  • Dark matter trapped in the Sun produces a flux of all flavors of neutrinos, which then reach the Earth after propagating out of the Sun and oscillating from the production point to the detector. The typical signal which is looked at refers to the muon neutrino component and consists of a flux of up-going muons in a neutrino detector. We propose instead a novel signature: the possibility of looking at the tau neutrino component of the dark matter signal, which is almost background-free in the downward-going direction, since the tau neutrino amount in atmospheric neutrinos is negligible and in the down-going baseline atmospheric muon-neutrinos have no time to sizably oscillate. We analyze the prospects of studying the downward-going tau neutrinos from dark matter annihilation (or decay) in the Sun in Cherenkov detectors, by looking at hadronic showers produced in the charged-current tau neutrino interactions and subsequent tau decay. We discuss the various sources of background (namely the small tau neutrino component in atmospheric neutrinos, both from direct production and from oscillations; tau neutrinos from solar corona interactions; the galactic tau neutrino component) as well as sources of background due to misidentification of electron and muon events. We find that the downward-going tau neutrinos signal has potentially very good prospects for Mton scale Cherenkov detectors, the main limitation being the level of misidentification of non-tau events, which need to be kept at level of percent. Several tens of events per year (depending on the dark matter mass and annihilation/decay channel) are potentially collectible with a Mton scale detector, and a 5 sigma significance discovery is potentially reachable for dark matter masses in the range from 20 to 300 GeV with a few years of exposure on a Mton detector.
  • We study the fluxes of neutrinos from annihilations of dark matter particles in the Sun and the Earth. We give the spectra of all neutrino flavors for the main known annihilation channels: nu-antinu, b-bbar, tau-taubar, c-cbar, light quarks, ZZ, W^+W^-. We present the appropriate formalism for computing the combined effect of oscillations, absorptions, nu_tau-regeneration. Total rates are modified by an O(0.1--10) factor, comparable to astrophysical uncertainties, that instead negligibly affect the spectra. We then calculate different signal topologies in neutrino telescopes: through-going muons, contained muons, showers, and study their capabilities to discriminate a dark matter signal from backgrounds. We finally discuss how measuring the neutrino spectra can allow to reconstruct the fundamental properties of the dark matter: its mass and its annihilation branching ratios.
  • Recent PAMELA and ATIC data seem to indicate an excess in positron cosmic rays above approximately 10 GeV which might be due to galactic Dark Matter particle annihilation. However the background of this signal suffers many uncertainties that make our task difficult in constraining Dark Matter or any other astrophysical explanation for these recent surprising data.
  • A few multiplets that can be added to the SM contain a lightest neutral component which is automatically stable and provides allowed DM candidates with a non-standard phenomenology. Thanks to coannihilations, a successful thermal abundance is obtained for well defined DM masses. The best candidate seems to be a SU(2)_L fermion quintuplet with mass 4.4 TeV, accompanied by a charged partner 166 MeV heavier with life-time 1.8 cm, that manifests at colliders as charged tracks disappearing in pi^\pm with 97.7% branching ratio. The cross section for usual NC direct DM detection is sigma_SI = f^2 1.0 10^-43 cm^2 where f ~ 1 is a nucleon matrix element. We study prospects for CC direct detection and for indirect detection.
  • In this review article the current status of particle dark matter is addressed. We discuss the main theoretical extensions of the standard model which allow to explain dark matter in terms of a (yet undiscovered) elementary particle. We then discuss the theoretical predictions for the searches of particle dark matter: direct detection in low background underground experiments and indirect detection of neutrinos, gamma-rays and antimatter with terrestrial and space-borne detectors. Attention will be placed also on the discussion of the uncertainties, mainly of astrophysical origin, which affect the theoretical predictions. The constraints placed by these searches on the extensions of the standard models will be briefly addressed.
  • This report is a brief review of the efforts to explain the nature of non-baryonic dark matter and of the studies devoted to the search for relic particles. Among the different dark matter candidates, special attention is devoted to relic neutralinos, by giving an overview of the recent calculations of its relic abundance and detection rates in a wide variety of supersymmetric schemes.