• Millimeter-wave continuum astronomy is today an indispensable tool for both general Astrophysics studies and Cosmology. General purpose, large field-of-view instruments are needed to map the sky at intermediate angular scales not accessible by the high-resolution interferometers and by the coarse angular resolution space-borne or ground-based surveys. These instruments have to be installed at the focal plane of the largest single-dish telescopes. In this context, we have constructed and deployed a multi-thousands pixels dual-band (150 and 260 GHz, respectively 2mm and 1.15mm wavelengths) camera to image an instantaneous field-of-view of 6.5arc-min and configurable to map the linear polarization at 260GHz. We are providing a detailed description of this instrument, named NIKA2 (New IRAM KID Arrays 2), in particular focusing on the cryogenics, the optics, the focal plane arrays based on Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) and the readout electronics. We are presenting the performance measured on the sky during the commissioning runs that took place between October 2015 and April 2017 at the 30-meter IRAM (Institut of Millimetric Radio Astronomy) telescope at Pico Veleta. NIKA2 has been successfully deployed and commissioned, performing in-line with the ambitious expectations. In particular, NIKA2 exhibits FWHM angular resolutions of around 11 and 17.5 arc-seconds at respectively 260 and 150GHz. The NEFD (Noise Equivalent Flux Densities) demonstrated on the maps are, at these two respective frequencies, 33 and 8 mJy*sqrt(s). A first successful science verification run has been achieved in April 2017. The instrument is currently offered to the astronomical community during the coming winter and will remain available for at least the next ten years.
  • The aims are to investigate the clustering of the far-infrared sources from the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) in the Galactic longitude range of -71 to 67 deg. These clumps, and their spatial distribution, are an imprint of the original conditions within a molecular cloud. This will produce a catalogue of over-densities. The minimum spanning tree (MST) method was used to identify the over-densities in two dimensions. The catalogue was further refined by folding in heliocentric distances, resulting in more reliable over-densities, which are cluster candidates. We found 1,633 over-densities with more than ten members. Of these, 496 are defined as cluster candidates because of the reliability of the distances, with a further 1,137 potential cluster candidates. The spatial distributions of the cluster candidates are different in the first and fourth quadrants, with all clusters following the spiral structure of the Milky Way. The cluster candidates are fractal. The clump mass functions of the clustered and isolated are statistically indistinguishable from each other and are consistent with Kroupa's initial mass function.
  • We report the dramatic mid-infrared brightening between 2004 and 2006 of HOPS 383, a deeply embedded protostar adjacent to NGC 1977 in Orion. By 2008, the source became a factor of 35 brighter at 24 microns with a brightness increase also apparent at 4.5 microns. The outburst is also detected in the submillimeter by comparing APEX/SABOCA to SCUBA data, and a scattered-light nebula appeared in NEWFIRM K_s imaging. The post-outburst spectral energy distribution indicates a Class 0 source with a dense envelope and a luminosity between 6 and 14 L_sun. Post-outburst time-series mid- and far-infrared photometry shows no long-term fading and variability at the 18% level between 2009 and 2012. HOPS 383 is the first outbursting Class 0 object discovered, pointing to the importance of episodic accretion at early stages in the star formation process. Its dramatic rise and lack of fading over a six-year period hint that it may be similar to FU Ori outbursts, although the luminosity appears to be significantly smaller than the canonical luminosities of such objects.
  • This paper provides an overview of the PACS photometer flux calibration concept, in particular for the principal observation mode, the scan map. The absolute flux calibration is tied to the photospheric models of five fiducial stellar standards (alpha Boo, alpha Cet, alpha Tau, beta And, gamma Dra). The data processing steps to arrive at a consistent and homogeneous calibration are outlined. In the current state the relative photometric accuracy is around 2% in all bands. Starting from the present calibration status, the characterization and correction for instrumental effects affecting the relative calibration accuracy is described and an outlook for the final achievable calibration numbers is given. After including all the correction for the instrumental effects, the relative photometric calibration accuracy (repeatability) will be as good as 0.5% in the blue and green band and 2% in the red band. This excellent calibration starts to reveal possible inconsistencies between the models of the K-type and the M-type stellar calibrators. The absolute calibration accuracy is therefore mainly limited by the 5% uncertainty of the celestial standard models in all three bands. The PACS bolometer response was extremely stable over the entire Herschel mission and a single, time-independent response calibration file is sufficient for the processing and calibration of the science observations. The dedicated measurements of the internal calibration sources were needed only to characterize secondary effects. No aging effects of the bolometer or the filters have been found. Also, we found no signs of filter leaks. The PACS photometric system is very well characterized with a constant energy spectrum nu*Fnu = lambda*Flambda = const as a reference. Colour corrections for a wide range of sources SEDs are determined and tabulated.
  • We present a flux calibration scheme for the PACS chopped point-source photometry observing mode based on the photometry of five stellar standard sources. This mode was used for science observations only early in the mission. Later, it was only used for pointing and flux calibration measurements. Its calibration turns this type of observation into fully validated data products in the Herschel Science Archive. Systematic differences in calibration with regard to the principal photometer observation mode, the scan map, are derived and amount to 5-6%. An empirical method to calibrate out an apparent response drift during the first 300 Operational Days is presented. The relative photometric calibration accuracy (repeatability) is as good as 1% in the blue and green band and up to 5% in the red band. Like for the scan map mode, inconsistencies among the stellar calibration models become visible and amount to 2% for the five standard stars used. The absolute calibration accuracy is therefore mainly limited by the model uncertainty, which is 5% for all three bands.
  • The CEA/LETI and CEA/SAp started the development of far-infrared filled bolometer arrays for space applications over a decade ago. The unique design of these detectors makes possible the assembling of large focal planes comprising thousands of bolometers running at 300 mK with very low power dissipation. Ten arrays of 16x16 pixels were thoroughly tested on the ground, and integrated in the Herschel/PACS instrument before launch in May 2009. These detectors have been successfully commissioned and are now operating in their nominal environment at the second Lagrangian point of the Earth-Sun system. In this paper we briefly explain the functioning of CEA bolometer arrays, and we present the properties of the detectors focusing on their noise characteristics, the effect of cosmic rays on the signal, the repeatability of the measurements, and the stability of the system.
  • We present 870 micron images of four low metallicity galaxies (NGC1705, Haro11, Mrk1089 and UM311) observed with the Large APEX BOlometer CAmera (LABOCA). We model their spectral energy distributions combining the submm observations of LABOCA, 2MASS, IRAS, Spitzer photometric data and the IRS data for Haro11. We find that a significant mass of dust is revealed when using submm constraints compared to that measured with only mid-IR to far-IR observations extending only to 160 microns. For NGC1705 and Haro11, an excess in submillimeter wavelengths is detected and we rerun our SED procedure adding a cold dust component (10K) to better describe the high 870 micron flux derived from LABOCA observations, which significantly improves the fit. We find that at least 70% of the dust mass of these two galaxies can reside in a cold dust component. We also show that the subsequent dust-to-gas mass ratios, considering HI and CO observations, can be strikingly high for Haro11 in comparison with what is usually expected for these low-metallicity environments. Furthermore, we derive the SFR of our galaxies and compare them to the Schmidt law. Haro11 falls anomalously far from the Schmidt relation. These results may suggest that a reservoir of hidden gas could be present in molecular form not traced by the current CO observations. We also derive the total IR luminosities derived from our models and compare them with relations that derive this luminosity from Spitzer bands. We find that the Draine & Li (2007) formula compares well to our direct IR determinations.
  • The Herschel Space Observatory is a corner stone mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) scientific program. With its spatial resolution, sensitivity and spectral range (60 to 670 microns) Herschel will provide astronomers with unique opportunities to decipher many aspects of star formation mecanisms and galaxy evolution. Among the many research institutes involved in the development and exploitation of this challenging observatory, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) designed a novel type of bolometric detectors to equip the photometer of the PACS instrument on-board the Herschel satellite. In this thesis, I present the basics of infrared astronomy and past and present developments in cryogenic bolometers, emphasising on new concepts introduced by CEA, that is the collective manufacturing of bolometer arrays, the high impedance thermometers, the cold multiplexing and the use of a resonant cavity to optimize absorption of electromagnetic radiation. I follow with an in-depth explanation of the working principles of CEA bolometer arrays, a prerequisite to grasp the strategy of the characterisation procedure that we developed. I then expose and analyse thoroughly the results that we obtained during the calibration campaign of the PACS photometer. Finally, I express detector performances in terms of "observational" performances that future PACS users can comprehend (time constant -> PSF smearing, NEP -> sensitivity, etc.).
  • The development program of the flight model imaging camera for the PACS instrument on-board the Herschel spacecraft is nearing completion. This camera has two channels covering the 60 to 210 microns wavelength range. The focal plane of the short wavelength channel is made of a mosaic of 2x4 3-sides buttable bolometer arrays (16x16 pixels each) for a total of 2048 pixels, while the long wavelength channel has a mosaic of 2 of the same bolometer arrays for a total of 512 pixels. The 10 arrays have been fabricated, individually tested and integrated in the photometer. They represent the first filled arrays of fully collectively built bolometers with a cold multiplexed readout, allowing for a properly sampled coverage of the full instrument field of view. The camera has been fully characterized and the ground calibration campaign will take place after its delivery to the PACS consortium in mid 2006. The bolometers, working at a temperature of 300 mK, have a NEP close to the BLIP limit and an optical bandwidth of 4 to 5 Hz that will permit the mapping of large sky areas. This paper briefly presents the concept and technology of the detectors as well as the cryocooler and the warm electronics. Then we focus on the performances of the integrated focal planes (responsivity, NEP, low frequency noise, bandwidth).