• We present a simple family of Bell inequalities applicable to a scenario involving arbitrarily many parties, each of which performs two binary-outcome measurements. We show that these inequalities are members of the complete set of full-correlation Bell inequalities discovered by Werner-Wolf-Zukowski-Brukner. For scenarios involving a small number of parties, we further verify that these inequalities are facet-defining for the convex set of Bell-local correlations. Moreover, we show that the amount of quantum violation of these inequalities naturally manifests the extent to which the underlying system is genuinely many-body entangled. In other words, our Bell inequalities, when supplemented with the appropriate quantum bounds, naturally serve as device-independent witnesses for entanglement depth, allowing one to certify genuine k-partite entanglement in an arbitrary $n\ge k$-partite scenario without relying on any assumption about the measurements being performed, nor the dimension of the underlying physical system. A brief comparison is made between our witnesses and those based on some other Bell inequalities, as well as the quantum Fisher information. A family of witnesses for genuine k-partite nonlocality applicable to an arbitrary $n\ge k$-partite scenario based on our Bell inequalities is also presented.
  • Large-scale quantum effects have always played an important role in the foundations of quantum theory. With recent experimental progress and the aspiration for quantum enhanced applications, the interest in macroscopic quantum effects has been reinforced. In this review, we critically analyze and discuss measures aiming to quantify various aspects of macroscopic quantumness. We survey recent results on the difficulties and prospects to create, maintain and detect macroscopic quantum states. The role of macroscopic quantum states in foundational questions as well as practical applications is outlined. Finally, we present past and on-going experimental advances aiming to generate and observe macroscopic quantum states.
  • The semi-device-independent framework allows one to draw conclusions about properties of an unknown quantum system under weak assumptions. Here we present a semi-device-independent scheme for the characterisation of multipartite entanglement based around a game played by several isolated parties whose devices are uncharacterised beyond an assumption about the dimension of their Hilbert spaces. Our scheme can certify that an $n$-partite high-dimensional quantum state features genuine multipartite entanglement. Moreover, the scheme can certify that a joint measurement on $n$ subsystems is entangled, and provides a lower bound on the number of entangled measurement operators. These tests are strongly robust to noise, and even optimal for certain classes of states and measurements, as we demonstrate with illustrative examples. Notably, our scheme allows for the certification of many entangled states admitting a local model, which therefore cannot violate any Bell inequality.
  • Do experiments based on superconducting loops segmented with Josephson junctions (e.g., flux qubits) show macroscopic quantum behavior in the sense of Schr\"odinger's cat example? Various arguments based on microscopic and phenomenological models were recently adduced in this debate. We approach this problem by adapting (to flux qubits) the framework of large-scale quantum coherence, which was already successfully applied to spin ensembles and photonic systems. We show that contemporary experiments might show quantum coherence more than 100 times larger than experiments in the classical regime. However, we argue that the often-used demonstration of an avoided crossing in the energy spectrum is not sufficient to make a conclusion about the presence of large-scale quantum coherence. Alternative, rigorous witnesses are proposed.
  • It is usual to identify initial conditions of classical dynamical systems with mathematical real numbers. However, almost all real numbers contain an infinite amount of information. Since a finite volume of space can't contain more than a finite amount of information, I argue that the mathematical real numbers are not physically real. Moreover, a better terminology for the so-called real numbers is "random numbers", as their series of bits are truly random. I propose an alternative classical mechanics that uses only finite-information numbers. This alternative classical mechanics is non-deterministic, despite the use of deterministic equations, in a way similar to quantum theory. Interestingly, both alternative classical mechanics and quantum theories can be supplemented by additional variables in such a way that the supplemented theory is deterministic. Most physicists straightforwardly supplement classical theory with real numbers to which they attribute physical existence, while most physicists reject Bohmian mechanics as supplemented quantum theory, arguing that Bohmian positions have no physical reality. I argue that it is more economical and natural to accept non-determinism with potentialities as a real mode of existence, both for classical and quantum physics.
  • We characterize the Europium (Eu$^{3+}$) hyperfine interaction of the excited state ($^5$D$_0$) and determine its effective spin Hamiltonian parameters for the Zeeman and quadrupole tensors. An optical free induction decay method is used to measure all hyperfine splittings under weak external magnetic field (up to 10 mT) for various field orientations. On the basis of the determined Hamiltonian we discuss the possibility to predict optical transition probabilities between hyperfine levels for the $^7$F$_{0} \longleftrightarrow ^5$D$_{0}$ transition. The obtained results provide necessary information to realize an optical quantum memory scheme which utilizes long spin coherence properties of $^{151}$Eu$^{3+}$:Y$_2$SiO$_5$ material under external magnetic fields
  • Quantum non-locality has been an extremely fruitful subject of research, leading the scientific revolution towards quantum information science, in particular to device-independent quantum information processing. We argue that time is ripe to work on another basic problem in the foundations of quantum physics, the quantum measurement problem, that should produce good physics both in theoretical, mathematical, experimental and applied physics. We briefly review how quantum non-locality contributed to physics (including some outstanding open problems) and suggest ways in which questions around Macroscopic Quantumness could equally contribute to all aspects of physics.
  • Quantum measurements have intrinsic properties which seem incompatible with our everyday-life macroscopic measurements. Macroscopic Quantum Measurement (MQM) is a concept that aims at bridging the gap between well understood microscopic quantum measurements and macroscopic classical measurements. In this paper, we focus on the task of the polarization direction estimation of a system of $N$ spins $1/2$ particles and investigate the model some of us proposed in Barnea et al., 2017. This model is based on a von Neumann pointer measurement, where each spin component of the system is coupled to one of the three spatial components direction of a pointer. It shows traits of a classical measurement for an intermediate coupling strength. We investigate relaxations of the assumptions on the initial knowledge about the state and on the control over the MQM. We show that the model is robust with regard to these relaxations. It performs well for thermal states and a lack of knowledge about the size of the system. Furthermore, a lack of control on the MQM can be compensated by repeated "ultra-weak" measurements.
  • Solid-state electronic spins are extensively studied in quantum information science, both for quantum computation, sensing and communication. Electronic spins are highly interesting due to their large magnetic moments, which offer fast operations for computing and communication, and high sensitivity for sensing. However, the large moment also implies higher sensitivity to a noisy magnetic environment, which often reduces coherence times. Yet, material preparation of the spectroscopic properties of electronic spins, e.g. using clock transitions and isotopic engineering, can yield remarkable spin coherence times, as for electronic spins in GaAs, donors in silicon and vacancy centres in diamond. For no material it has been demonstrated, however, that such coherence enhancement techniques can be engineered at the same time for transitions in the spin and optical domains. Here we demonstrate simultaneously induced clock transitions for both microwave and optical domains in an isotopically purified $^{171}$Yb$^{3+}$:Y$_2$SiO$_5$ crystal, reaching coherence times of above 100 $\mu$s and 1~ms in the optical and microwave domain, respectively. This effect is due to the highly anisotropic hyperfine interaction in $^{171}$Yb$^{3+}$:Y$_2$SiO$_5$, which makes each electronic state an entangled Bell state. In particular, our results shows the great potential of $^{171}$Yb$^{3+}$:Y$_2$SiO$_5$ for quantum processing applications relying on both optical and spin manipulation, such as optical quantum memories, microwave-to-optical quantum transducers, and single spin detection. In general, similar effects should also be observable in a range of different materials with anisotropic hyperfine interaction.
  • Rare-earth ion doped crystals are promising systems for quantum communication and quantum information processing. In particular, paramagnetic rare-earth centres can be utilized to realize quantum coherent interfaces simultaneously for optical and microwave photons. In this article, we study hyperfine and magnetic properties of a Y$_2$SiO$_5$ crystal doped with $^{171}$Yb$^{3+}$ ions. This isotope is particularly interesting since it is the only rare--earth ion having electronic spin $S=\frac{1}{2}$ and nuclear spin $I=\frac{1}{2}$, which results in the simplest possible hyperfine level structure. In this work we determine the hyperfine tensors for the ground and excited states on the optical $^2$F$_{7/2}(0) \longleftrightarrow ^2$F$_{5/2}$(0) transition by combining spectral holeburning and optically detected magnetic resonance techniques. The resulting spin Hamiltonians correctly predict the magnetic-field dependence of all observed optical-hyperfine transitions, from zero applied field to the high-field regime where the Zeeman interaction is dominating. Using the optical absorption spectrum we can also determine the order of the hyperfine levels in both states. These results pave the way for realizing solid-state optical and microwave quantum memories based on a $^{171}$Yb$^{3+}$:Y$_2$SiO$_5$ crystal.
  • The use of multidimensional entanglement opens new perspectives for quantum information processing. However, an important challenge in practice is to certify and characterize multidimensional entanglement from measurement data that are typically limited. Here, we report the certification and quantification of two-photon multidimensional energy-time entanglement between many temporal modes, after one photon has been stored in a crystal. We develop a method for entanglement quantification which makes use of only sparse data obtained with limited resources. This allows us to efficiently certify an entanglement of formation of 1.18 ebits after performing quantum storage. The theoretical methods we develop can be readily extended to a wide range of experimental platforms, while our experimental results demonstrate the suitability of energy-time multidimensional entanglement for a quantum repeater architecture.
  • We consider a spin chain extending from Alice to Bob with next neighbors interactions, initially in its ground state. Assuming that Bob measures the last spin of the chain, the energy of the spin chain has to increase, at least on average, due to the measurement disturbance. Presumably, the energy is provided by Bob's measurement apparatus. Assuming now that, simultaneously to Bob's measurement, Alice measures the first spin, we show that either energy is not conserved, - implausible - or the projection postulate doesn't apply, and that there is signalling. An explicit measurement model shows that energy is conserved (as expected), but that the spin chain energy increase is not provided by the measurement apparatus(es), that the projection postulate is not always valid - illustrating the Wigner-Araki-Yanase (WAY) theorem - and that there is signalling, indeed. The signalling is due to the non-local interaction Hamiltonian. This raises the question of a suitable quantum information inspired model of such non-local Hamiltonians.
  • We present an algebraic description of the sets of local correlations in arbitrary networks, when the parties have finite inputs and outputs. We consider networks generalizing the usual Bell scenarios by the presence of multiple uncorrelated sources. We prove a finite upper bound on the cardinality of the value sets of the local hidden variables. Consequently, we find that the sets of local correlations are connected, closed and semialgebraic, and bounded by tight polynomial Bell-like inequalities.
  • In order to study N-locality without inputs in long lines and in configurations with loops, e.g. the triangle, we introduce a natural joint measurement on two qubits different from the usual Bell state measurement. The resulting quantum probability $p(a_1,a_2,...,a_N)$ has interesting features. In particular the probability that all results are equal is that large, while respecting full symmetry, that it seems highly implausible that one could reproduce it with any N-local model, though - unfortunately - I have not been unable to prove it.
  • Assuming a well-behaving quantum-to-classical transition, measuring large quantum systems should be highly informative with low measurement-induced disturbance, while the coupling between system and measurement apparatus is "fairly simple" and weak. Here, we show that this is indeed possible within the formalism of quantum mechanics. We discuss an example of estimating the collective magnetization of a spin ensemble by simultaneous measuring three orthogonal spin directions. For the task of estimating the direction of a spin-coherent state, we find that the average guessing fidelity and the system disturbance are nonmonotonic functions of the coupling strength. Strikingly, we discover an intermediate regime for the coupling strength where the guessing fidelity is quasi-optimal, while the measured state is almost not disturbed.
  • Different variants of a Bell inequality, such as CHSH and CH, are known to be equivalent when evaluated on nonsignaling outcome probability distributions. However, in experimental setups, the outcome probability distributions are estimated using a finite number of samples. Therefore the nonsignaling conditions are only approximately satisfied and the robustness of the violation depends on the chosen inequality variant. We explain that phenomenon using the decomposition of the space of outcome probability distributions under the action of the symmetry group of the scenario, and propose a method to optimize the statistical robustness of a Bell inequality. In the process, we describe the finite group composed of relabeling of parties, measurement settings and outcomes, and identify correspondences between the irreducible representations of this group and properties of outcome probability distributions such as normalization, signaling or having uniform marginals.
  • The realization of quantum networks and quantum repeaters remains an outstanding challenge in quantum communication. These rely on entanglement of remote matter systems, which in turn requires creation of quantum correlations between a single photon and a matter system. A practical way to establish such correlations is via spontaneous Raman scattering in atomic ensembles, known as the DLCZ scheme. However, time multiplexing is inherently difficult using this method, which leads to low communication rates even in theory. Moreover, it is desirable to find solid-state ensembles where such matter-photon correlations could be generated. Here we demonstrate quantum correlations between a single photon and a spin excitation in up to 12 temporal modes, in a $^{151}$Eu$^{3+}$ doped Y$_2$SiO$_5$ crystal, using a novel DLCZ approach that is inherently multimode. After a storage time of 1 ms, the spin excitation is converted into a second photon. The quantum correlation of the generated photon pair is verified by violating a Cauchy - Schwarz inequality. Our results show that solid-state rare-earth crystals could be used to generate remote multi-mode entanglement, an important resource for future quantum networks.
  • Collapse. What else? (1701.08300)

    April 25, 2017 quant-ph
    We present the quantum measurement problem as a serious physics problem. Serious because without a resolution, quantum theory is not complete, as it does not tell how one should - in principle - perform measurements. It is physical in the sense that the solution will bring new physics, i.e. new testable predictions, hence it is not merely a matter of interpretation of a frozen formalism. I argue that the two popular ways around the measurement problem, many-worlds and Bohmian-like mechanics, do, de facto, introduce effective collapses when "I" interact with the quantum system. Hence, surprisingly, in many-worlds and Bohmian mechanics, the "I" plays a more active role than in alternative models, like e.g. collapse models. Finally, I argue that either there are several kinds of stuffs out there, i.e. physical dualism, some stuff that respects the superposition principle and some that doesn't, or there are special configurations of atoms and photons for which the superposition principle breaks down. Or, and this I argue is the most promising, the dynamics has to be modified, i.e. in the form of a stochastic Schr\"odinger equation.
  • We consider the characterization of quantum superposition states beyond the pattern "dead and alive". We propose a measure that is applicable to superpositions of multiple macroscopically distinct states, superpositions with different weights as well as mixed states. The measure is based on the mutual information to characterize the distinguishability between multiple superposition states. This allows us to overcome limitations of previous proposals, and to bridge the gap between general measures for macroscopic quantumness and measures for Schr\"odinger-cat type superpositions. We discuss a number of relevant examples, provide an alternative definition using basis-dependent quantum discord and reveal connections to other proposals in the literature. Finally, we also show the connection between the size of quantum states as quantified by our measure and their vulnerability to noise.
  • Quantum theory predicts that entanglement can also persist in macroscopic physical systems, albeit difficulties to demonstrate it experimentally remain. Recently, significant progress has been achieved and genuine entanglement between up to 2900 atoms was reported. Here we demonstrate 16 million genuinely entangled atoms in a solid-state quantum memory prepared by the heralded absorption of a single photon. We develop an entanglement witness for quantifying the number of genuinely entangled particles based on the collective effect of directed emission combined with the nonclassical nature of the emitted light. The method is applicable to a wide range of physical systems and is effective even in situations with significant losses. Our results clarify the role of multipartite entanglement in ensemble-based quantum memories as a necessary prerequisite to achieve a high single-photon process fidelity crucial for future quantum networks. On a more fundamental level, our results reveal the robustness of certain classes of multipartite entangled states, contrary to, e.g., Schr\"odinger-cat states, and that the depth of entanglement can be experimentally certified at unprecedented scales.
  • High-dimensional entanglement offers promising perspectives in quantum information science. In practice, however, the main challenge is to devise efficient methods to characterize high-dimensional entanglement, based on the available experimental data which is usually rather limited. Here we report the characterization and certification of high-dimensional entanglement in photon pairs, encoded in temporal modes. Building upon recently developed theoretical methods, we certify an entanglement of formation of 2.09(7) ebits in a time-bin implementation, and 4.1(1) ebits in an energy-time implementation. These results are based on very limited sets of local measurements, which illustrates the practical relevance of these methods.
  • The problem of characterizing classical and quantum correlations in networks is considered. Contrary to the usual Bell scenario, where distant observers share a physical system emitted by one common source, a network features several independent sources, each distributing a physical system to a subset of observers. In the quantum setting, the observers can perform joint measurements on initially independent systems, which may lead to strong correlations across the whole network. In this work, we introduce a technique to systematically map a Bell inequality to a family of Bell-type inequalities bounding classical correlations on networks in a star-configuration. Also, we show that whenever a given Bell inequality can be violated by some entangled state $\rho$, then all the corresponding network inequalities can be violated by considering many copies of $\rho$ distributed in the star network. The relevance of these ideas is illustrated by applying our method to a specific multi-setting Bell inequality. We derive the corresponding network inequalities, and study their quantum violations.
  • The nature of quantum correlations in networks featuring independent sources of entanglement remains poorly understood. Here, focusing on the simplest network of entanglement swapping, we start a systematic characterization of the set of quantum states leading to violation of the so-called "bilocality" inequality. First, we show that all possible pairs of entangled pure states can violate the inequality. Next, we derive a general criterion for violation for arbitrary pairs of mixed two-qubit states. Notably, this reveals a strong connection between the CHSH Bell inequality and the bilocality inequality, namely that any entangled state violating CHSH also violates the bilocality inequality. We conclude with a list of open questions.
  • Multiplexed quantum memories capable of storing and processing entangled photons are essential for the development of quantum networks. In this context, we demonstrate the simultaneous storage and retrieval of two entangled photons inside a solid-state quantum memory and measure a temporal multimode capacity of ten modes. This is achieved by producing two polarization entangled pairs from parametric down conversion and mapping one photon of each pair onto a rare-earth-ion doped (REID) crystal using the atomic frequency comb (AFC) protocol. We develop a concept of indirect entanglement witnesses, which can be used as Schmidt number witness, and we use it to experimentally certify the presence of more than one entangled pair retrieved from the quantum memory. Our work puts forward REID-AFC as a platform compatible with temporal multiplexing of several entangled photon pairs along with a new entanglement certification method useful for the characterisation of multiplexed quantum memories.
  • We present a detailed study of the lifetime of optical spectral holes due to population storage in Zeeman sublevels of Nd$^{3+}$:Y$_2$SiO$_5$. The lifetime is measured as a function of magnetic field strength and orientation, temperature and Nd$^{3+}$ doping concentration. At the lowest temperature of 3 K we find a general trend where the lifetime is short at low field strengths, then increases to a maximum lifetime at a few hundreds of mT, and then finally decays rapidly for high field strengths. This behaviour can be modelled with a relaxation rate dominated by Nd$^{3+}$-Nd$^{3+}$ cross relaxation at low fields and spin lattice relaxation at high magnetic fields. The maximum lifetime depends strongly on both the field strength and orientation, due to the competition between these processes and their different angular dependencies. The cross relaxation limits the maximum lifetime for concentrations as low as 30 ppm of Nd$^{3+}$ ions. By decreasing the concentration to less than 1 ppm we could completely eliminate the cross relaxation, reaching a lifetime of 3.8 s at 3~K. At higher temperatures the spectral hole lifetime is limited by the magnetic-field independent Raman and Orbach processes. In addition we show that the cross relaxation rate can be strongly reduced by creating spectrally large holes of the order of the optical inhomogeneous broadening. Our results are important for the development and design of new rare-earth-ion doped crystals for quantum information processing and narrow-band spectral filtering for biological tissue imaging.