• One of largest uncertainties in nuclear physics is the relation between the pressure and density of supranuclear matter: the equation of state. Some of this uncertainty may be removed through future gravitational wave observations of neutron star binaries by extracting the tidal deformabilities (or Love numbers) of neutron stars. Previous studies showed that only a certain combination of the individual deformabilities of each body (chirp tidal deformability) can be measured with second-generation gravitational wave interferometers, such as Adv. LIGO, due to correlations between the individual deformabilities. To overcome this, we search for approximately universal (or equation-of-state independent) relations between two combinations of the individual tidal deformabilities, such that once one of them has been measured, the other can be automatically obtained and the individual ones decoupled through these relations. We find an approximately universal relation between the symmetric and the anti-symmetric combination of the individual tidal deformabilities that is equation-of-state-insensitive to $20\%$ for binaries with masses less than $1.7M_\odot$. We show that these relations can be used to eliminate a combination of the tidal parameters from the list of model parameters, thus breaking degeneracies and improving the accuracy in parameter estimation. A simple study shows that the universal relations can improve the accuracy in the extraction of the symmetric combination of tidal parameters by as much as an order of magnitude, making the overall accuracy in the extraction of this parameter slightly better than that of the chirp tidal deformability. These new universal relations and the improved measurement accuracy on tidal parameters not only are important to astrophysics and nuclear physics, but also impact our ability to probe extreme gravity with gravitational waves and cosmology.
  • The LIGO/Virgo detections of binary black hole mergers marked a watershed moment in astronomy, ushering in the era of precision tests of Kerr dynamics. We review theoretical and experimental challenges that must be overcome to carry out black hole spectroscopy with present and future gravitational wave detectors. Among other topics, we discuss quasinormal mode excitation in binary mergers, astrophysical event rates, tests of black hole dynamics in modified theories of gravity, parameterized "post-Kerr" ringdown tests, exotic compact objects, and proposed data analysis methods to improve spectroscopic tests of Kerr dynamics by stacking multiple events.
  • The recent gravitational wave observations by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration have allowed the first tests of General Relativity in the extreme gravity regime, when comparable-mass black holes and neutron stars collide. Future space-based detectors, such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, will allow tests of Einstein's theory with gravitational waves emitted when a small black hole falls into a supermassive one in an extreme mass-ratio inspiral. One particular test that is tailor-made for such inspirals is the search for chaos in extreme gravity. We here study whether chaos is present in the motion of test particles around spinning black holes of parity-violating modified gravity, focusing in particular on dynamical Chern-Simons gravity. We develop a resummation strategy that restores all spin terms in the General Relativity limit, while retaining up to fifth-order-in-spin terms in the dynamical Chern-Simons corrections to the Kerr metric. We then calculate Poincar\'e surfaces of section and rotation numbers of a wide family of geodesics of this resummed metric. We find no evidence for geodesic chaos, with at most deformations of the resonant torii that shrink as terms of higher-order in spin are included in the dynamical Chern-Simons corrections to the Kerr metric. Our numerical findings suggest that the geodesics of the as-of-yet unknown exact solution for spinning black holes in this theory may be integrable, and that there may thus exist a fourth integral of motion associated with this exact solution. The studies presented here begin to lay the foundations for chaotic tests of General Relativity with the observation of extreme mass ratio inspirals with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna.
  • The observation of the inspiral and merger of compact binaries by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration ushered in a new era in the study of strong-field gravity. We review current and future tests of strong gravity and of the Kerr paradigm with gravitational-wave interferometers, both within a theory-agnostic framework (the parametrized post-Einsteinian formalism) and in the context of specific modified theories of gravity (scalar-tensor, Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet, dynamical Chern-Simons, Lorentz-violating, and extra dimensional theories). In this contribution we focus on (i) the information carried by the inspiral radiation, and (ii) recent progress in numerical simulations of compact binary mergers in modified gravity.
  • Is gravity parity violating? Given the recent observations of gravitational waves from coalescing compact binaries, we develop a strategy to find an answer with current and future detectors. We identify the key signatures of parity violation in gravitational waves: amplitude birefringence in their propagation and a modified chirping rate in their generation. We then determine the optimal binaries to test the existence of parity violation in gravity, and prioritize the research in modeling that will be required to carry out such tests before detectors reach their design sensitivity.
  • The loss of orbital energy and angular momentum to gravitational waves produced in a binary inspiral forces the orbital eccentricity to evolve. For comparable-mass binaries, the eccentricity is thought to decrease monotonically in the inspiral, circularizing the binary. Contrary to this, we here show that, once the eccentricity is small enough, radiation reaction forces the eccentricity to grow secularly before the binary reaches the last stable orbit and merges. We explore this behavior, its physical consequences, and its potential impact on future gravitational wave observations.
  • A binary neutron star (BNS) merger event has recently been observed in gravitational waves (GWs). As in the case of binary black holes, GWs generated by BNS consist of inspiral, merger, and post-merger components. Detecting the latter is important because it encodes information about the nuclear equation of state (EOS) in a regime that cannot be probed prior to merger. The post-merger signal, however, can be observed by current detectors only out to~ 10 Mpc. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulations showing that the dominant post-merger signal (the 22 mode) from individual events will likely not be observable even with the Einstein Telescope and Cosmic Explorer (CE), assuming a full year of operation, the latest merger rates, and a detection threshold with signal-to-noise ratio of 5. For this reason, we propose two methods that stack the post-merger signal from multiple events to boost the detection probability. The first method follows a commonly-used practice of multiplying the Bayes factors of individual events. The second method relies on an assumption that the mode phase can be determined from the inspiral waveform, so that coherent mode stacking of the data from different events becomes possible. Both methods significantly improve the chances of detecting the dominant post-merger signal, making a detection very likely after a year of observation with CE for certain EOS. We also show that in terms of detection, coherent stacking is more efficient in accumulating confidence. Moreover, assuming a 22 mode is detected with CE via stacking, we estimate through a Fisher analysis that the peak frequency can be measured to a statistical error of ~ 4-20 Hz for certain equations of state. Such an error corresponds to a NS radius measurement of ~ 15-56 m, a fractional relative error ~ 4 %, suggesting that systematic errors from theoretical modeling (~ 100 m) may dominate the error budget.
  • The opening of the gravitational wave window by ground-based laser interferometers has made possible many new tests of gravity, including the first constraints on polarization. It is hoped that within the next decade pulsar timing will extend the window by making the first detections in the nano-Hertz frequency regime. Pulsar timing offers several advantages over ground-based interferometers for constraining the polarization of gravitational waves due to the many projections of the polarization pattern provided by the different lines of sight to the pulsars, and the enhanced response to longitudinal polarizations. Here we show that existing results from pulsar timing arrays can be used to place stringent limits on the energy density of longitudinal stochastic gravitational waves. Paradoxically however, we find that longitudinal modes will be very difficult to detect due to the large variance in the pulsar-pulsar correlation patterns for these modes. Existing upper limits on the power spectrum of pulsar timing residuals imply that the amplitude of vector longitudinal and scalar longitudinal modes at frequencies of 1/year are constrained: ${\cal A}_{\rm VL} < 4.1\times 10^{-16}$ and ${\cal A}_{\rm SL} < 3.7\times 10^{-17}$, while the bounds on the energy density for a scale invariant cosmological background are: $\Omega_{\rm VL}h^2 < 3.5 \times 10^{-11}$ and $\Omega_{\rm SL}h^2 < 3.2 \times 10^{-13}$.
  • The recent detections of gravitational waves by the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors open up new tests of modified gravity theories in the strong-field and dynamical, extreme gravity regime. Such tests rely sensitively on the phase evolution of the gravitational waves, which is controlled by the energy-momentum carried by such waves out of the system. We here study four different methods for finding the gravitational wave stress-energy pseudo-tensor in gravity theories with any combination of scalar, vector, or tensor degrees of freedom. These methods rely on the second variation of the action under short-wavelength averaging, the second perturbation of the field equations in the short-wavelength approximation, the construction of an energy complex leading to a Landau-Lifshitz tensor, and the use of Noether's theorem in field theories about a flat background. We apply these methods in General Relativity, scalar-tensor theories and Einstein-\AE{}ther theory to find the gravitational wave stress-energy pseudo-tensor and calculate the rate at which energy and linear momentum is carried away from the system. The stress-energy tensor and the rate of linear momentum loss in Einstein-\AE{}ther theory are presented here for the first time. We find that all methods yield the same rate of energy loss, although the stress-energy pseudo-tensor can be functionally different. We also find that the Noether method yields a stress-energy tensor that is not symmetric or gauge-invariant, and symmetrization via the Belinfante procedure does not fix these problems because this procedure relies on Lorentz invariance, which is spontaneously broken in Einstein-\AE{}ther theory. The methods and results found here will be useful for the calculation of predictions in modified gravity theories that can then be contrasted with observations.
  • Neutron stars are ideal to probe, not only nuclear physics, but also strong-field gravity. Approximate universal relations insensitive to the star's internal structure exist among certain observables and are useful in testing General Relativity, as they project out the uncertainties in the equation of state. One such set of universal relations between the moment of inertia $(I)$, the tidal Love number and the quadrupole moment $(Q)$ has been studied both in General Relativity and in modified theories. In this paper, we study the relations in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity, a well-motivated, parity-violating effective field theory, extending previous work in various ways. First, we study how projected constraints on the theory using the I-Love relation depend on the measurement accuracy of $I$ with radio observations and that of the Love number with gravitational-wave observations. Provided these quantities can be measured with future observations, we find that the latter could place bounds on dynamical Chern-Simons gravity that are six orders of magnitude stronger than current bounds. Second, we study the I-Q and Q-Love relations in this theory by constructing slowly-rotating neutron star solutions to quadratic order in spin. We find that the approximate universality continues to hold in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity, and in fact, it becomes stronger than in General Relativity, although its existence depends on the normalization of the dimensional coupling constant of the theory. Finally, we study the variation of the eccentricity of isodensity contours inside a star and its relation to the degree of universality. We find that, in most cases, the eccentricity variation is smaller in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity than in General Relativity, providing further support to the idea that the approximate self-similarity of isodensity contours is responsible for universality.
  • This is an overview article of the mathematics of gravitational waves. We explain the mathematics and physics of these waves in general relativity theory, discuss the gravitational wave experiment aLIGO and their detection of gravitational waves as well as its implications for astrophysics. A version of this article was published in the AMS Notices, Vol. 64, Issue 07, 2017, (August issue 2017).
  • Certain bulk properties of neutron stars, in particular their moment of inertia, rotational quadrupole moment and tidal Love number, when properly normalized, are related to one another in a nearly equation of state independent way. The goal of this paper is to test these relations with extreme equations of state at supranuclear densities constrained to satisfy only a handful of generic, physically sensible conditions. By requiring that the equation of state be (i) barotropic and (ii) its associated speed of sound be real, we construct a piecewise function that matches a tabulated equation of state at low densities, while matching a stiff equation of state parametrized by its sound speed in the high-density region. We show that the I-Love-Q relations hold to 1 percent with this class of equations of state, even in the extreme case where the speed of sound becomes superluminal and independently of the transition density. We also find further support for the interpretation of the I-Love-Q relations as an emergent symmetry due to the nearly constant eccentricity of isodensity contours inside the star. These results reinforce the robustness of the I-Love-Q relations against our current incomplete picture of physics at supranuclear densities, while strengthening our confidence in the applicability of these relations in neutron star astrophysics.
  • The population of stellar-mass, compact object binaries that merge with non-negligible eccentricity may be large enough to motivate searches with ground-based gravitational wave detectors. Such events could be exceptional laboratories to test General Relativity in the dynamical, strong-field regime, as a larger fraction of the energy is emitted at high-velocities, compared to quasi-circular inspirals. A serious obstacle here, however, is the challenge of computing theoretical waveforms for eccentric systems with the requisite accuracy for use in a matched-filter search. The corresponding waveforms are more a sequence of concentrated bursts of energy emitted near periapse than a continuous waveform. Based on this, an alternative approach, stacking excess power over the set of time-frequency tiles coincident with the bursts, was recently suggested as a more practical (though sub-optimal) detection strategy. The leading-order "observable" that would be inferred from such a detection would be a sequence of discrete numbers characterizing the position and size of each time-frequency tile. In General Relativity, this (possibly large) sequence of numbers is uniquely determined by the small set of parameters describing the binary at formation. In this work, following the spirit of the parameterized post-Einsteinian framework developed for quasi-circular inspiral, we propose a simple, parameterized deformation of the baseline general relativistic burst algorithm for eccentric inspiral events that would allow for model-independent tests of Einstein's theory in this high-velocity, strong-field regime.
  • The scalar-tensor theory of Damour and Esposito-Far\`ese recently gained some renewed interest because of its ability to suppress modifications to General Relativity in the weak field, while introducing large corrections in the strong field of compact objects through a process called scalarization. A large sector of this theory that allows for scalarization, however, has been shown to be in conflict with Solar System observations when accounting for the cosmological evolution of the scalar field. We here study an extension of this theory by endowing the scalar field with a mass to determine whether this allows the theory to pass Solar System constraints upon cosmological evolution for a larger sector of coupling parameter space. We show that the cosmological scalar field goes first through a quiescent phase, similar to the behavior of a massless field, but then it enters an oscillatory phase, with an amplitude (and frequency) that decays (and grows) exponentially. We further show that after the field enters the oscillatory phase, its effective energy density and pressure are approximately those of dust, as expected from previous cosmological studies. Due to these oscillations, we show that the scalar field cannot be treated as static today on astrophysical scales, and so we use time-dependent perturbation theory to compute the scalar-field-induced modifications to Solar System observables. We find that these modifications are suppressed when the mass of the scalar field and the coupling parameter of the theory are in a wide range, allowing the theory to pass Solar System constraints, while in principle possibly still allowing for scalarization.
  • We study slowly-rotating neutron stars in ghost-free massive bigravity. This theory modifies General Relativity by introducing a second, auxiliary but dynamical tensor field that couples to matter through the physical metric tensor through non-linear interactions. We expand the field equations to linear order in slow rotation and numerically construct solutions in the interior and exterior of the star with a set of realistic equations of state. We calculate the physical mass function with respect to observer radius and find that, unlike in General Relativity, this function does not remain constant outside the star; rather, it asymptotes to a constant a distance away from the surface, whose magnitude is controlled by the ratio of gravitational constants. The Vainshtein-like radius at which the physical and auxiliary mass functions asymptote to a constant is controlled by the graviton mass scaling parameter, and outside this radius, bigravity modifications are suppressed. We also calculate the frame-dragging metric function and find that bigravity modifications are typically small in the entire range of coupling parameters explored. We finally calculate both the mass-radius and the moment of inertia-mass relations for a wide range of coupling parameters and find that both the graviton mass scaling parameter and the ratio of the gravitational constants introduce large modifications to both. These results could be used to place future constraints on bigravity with electromagnetic and gravitational-wave observations of isolated and binary neutron stars.
  • Binary pulsars are ideal to test the foundations of General Relativity, such as Lorentz symmetry, which requires that experiments produce the same results in all free-falling (i.e.inertial) frames. We here break this symmetry in the gravitational sector by specifying a preferred time direction, and thus a preferred frame, at each spacetime point. We then examine the consequences of this gravitational Lorentz symmetry breaking in the orbital evolution of binary pulsars, focusing on the dissipative effects. We find that Lorentz symmetry breaking modifies these effects, and thus the orbital dynamics, in two different ways. First, it generically causes the emission of dipolar radiation, which makes the orbital separation decrease faster than in General Relativity. Second, the quadrupole component of the emission is also modified. The orbital evolution depends critically on the sensitivities of the stars, which measure how their binding energies depend on the motion relative to the preferred frame. We calculate the sensitivities numerically and compute the predicted orbital decay rate of binary pulsars in Lorentz-violating gravity. By testing these predictions against observations, we place very stringent constraints on gravitational Lorentz violation.
  • We derive a stationary and axisymmetric black hole solution to quadratic order in the spin angular momentum. The previously found, linear-in-spin terms modify the odd-parity sector of the metric, while the new corrections appear in the even-parity sector. These corrections modify the quadrupole moment, as well as the (coordinate-dependent) location of the event horizon and the ergoregion. Although the linear-in-spin metric is of Petrov type D, the quadratic order terms render it of type I. The metric does not possess a second-order Killing tensor or a Carter-like constant. The new metric does not possess closed timelike curves or spacetime regions that violate causality outside of the event horizon. The new, even-parity modifications to the Kerr metric decay less rapidly at spatial infinity than the leading-order in spin, odd-parity ones, and thus, the former are more important when considering black holes that are rotating moderately fast. We calculate the modifications to the Hamiltonian, binding energy and Kepler's third law. These modifications are crucial for the construction of gravitational wave templates for black hole binaries, which will enter at second post-Newtonian order, just like dissipative modifications found previously.
  • The detection of GW150914 by ground based gravitational wave observatories has brought about a new era in astrophysics. At optimal sensitivity, these observatories are expected to detect several events each year, with one or two of these occurring with non-negligible eccentricity. Such eccentric binaries will emit bursts of gravitational radiation during every pericenter passage, where orbital velocities can reach greater than ten percent the speed of light. As a result, such binaries may prove to be powerful probes of extreme gravitational physics and astrophysics. A promising method of achieving detection of such binaries is through power stacking, where the power in each burst is added up in time-frequency space. This detection strategy requires a theoretical prior of where the bursts will occur in time and frequency so that one knows where to search for successive bursts. We here present a generic post-Newtonian formalism for constructing such time-frequency model priors at generic post-Newtonian order. We apply our formalism to generate a burst model at third post-Newtonian order, making it potentially the most accurate, fully analytic model to date.
  • We examine gravitational wave memory in the case where sources and detector are in a $\Lambda$CDM cosmology. We consider the case where the universe can be highly inhomogeneous, but the gravitatational radiation is treated in the short wavelength approximation. We find results very similar to those of gravitational wave memory in an asymptotically flat spacetime; however, the overall magnitude of the memory effect is enhanced by a redshift-dependent factor. In addition, we find the memory can be affected by lensing.
  • Observations of the continuum spectrum emitted by accretion disks around black holes allows us to infer their properties, including possibly whether black holes are described by the Kerr metric. Some modified gravity theories do not admit the Kerr metric as a solution, and thus, continuum spectrum observations could be used to constrain these theories. We here investigate whether current and next generation X-Ray observations of the black hole continuum spectrum can constrain such deviations from Einstein's theory, focusing on two well-motivated modified quadratic gravity theories: dynamical Chern-Simons gravity and Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We do so by determining whether the non-Kerr deviations in the continuum spectrum introduced by these theories are larger than the observational error intrinsic to the observations. We find that dynamical Chern-Simons gravity cannot be constrained better than current bounds with current or next generation continuum spectrum observations. Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, however, may be constrained better than current bounds with next generation telescopes, as long as the systematic error inherent in the accretion disk modeling is decreased below the predicted observational error.
  • Scalar-tensor theories of gravity modify General Relativity by introducing a scalar field that couples non-minimally to the metric tensor, while satisfying the weak-equivalence principle. These theories are interesting because they have the potential to simultaneously suppress modifications to Einstein's theory on Solar System scales, while introducing large deviations in the strong field of neutron stars. Scalar-tensor theories can be classified through the choice of conformal factor, a scalar that regulates the coupling between matter and the metric in the Einstein frame. The class defined by a Gaussian conformal factor with negative exponent has been studied the most because it leads to spontaneous scalarization (i.e. the sudden activation of the scalar field in neutron stars), which consequently leads to large deviations from General Relativity in the strong field. This class, however, has recently been shown to be in conflict with Solar System observations when accounting for the cosmological evolution of the scalar field. We study whether this remains the case when the exponent of the conformal factor is positive, as well as in another class of theories defined by a hyperbolic conformal factor. We find that in both of these scalar-tensor theories, Solar System tests are passed only in a very small subset of parameter space, for a large set of initial conditions compatible with Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. However, while we find that it is possible for neutron stars to scalarize, one must carefully select the coupling parameter to do so, and even then, the scalar charge is typically two orders of magnitude smaller than in the negative exponent case. Our study suggests that future work on scalar-tensor gravity, for example in the context of tests of General Relativity with gravitational waves from neutron star binaries, should be carried out within the positive coupling parameter class.
  • We develop a model-independent test of General Relativity that allows for the constraint of the gravitational wave (GW) polarization content with GW detections of binary compact object inspirals. We first consider three modified gravity theories (Brans-Dicke theory, Rosen's theory and Lightman-Lee theory) and calculate the response function of ground-based detectors to gravitational waves in the inspiral phase. This allows us to see how additional polarizations predicted in these theories modify the General Relativistic prediction of the response function. We then consider general power-law modifications to the Hamiltonian and radiation-reaction force and study how these modify the time-domain and Fourier response function when all polarizations are present. From these general arguments and specific modified gravity examples, we infer an improved parameterized post-Einsteinian template family with complete polarization content. This family enhances General Relativity templates through the inclusion of new theory parameters, reducing to the former when these parameters acquire certain values, and recovering modified gravity predictions for other values, including all polarizations. We conclude by discussing detection strategies to constrain these new, polarization theory parameters by constructing certain null channels through the combination of output from multiple detectors.
  • The coalescence of compact objects is one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves for ground-based interferometric detectors, such as advanced LIGO and Virgo. Generically, com- pact objects in binaries are expected to be spinning with spin angular momenta misaligned with the orbital angular momentum, causing the orbital plane to precess. This precession adds rich structure to the gravitational waves, introducing such complexity that an analytic closed-form description has been unavailable until now. We here construct the first closed-form frequency- domain gravitational waveforms that are valid for generic spin-precessing quasicircular compact binary inspirals. We first construct time-domain gravitational waves by solving the post-Newtonian precession equations of motion with radiation reaction through multiple scale analysis. We then Fourier transform these time-domain waveforms with the method of shifted uniform asymptotics to obtain closed-form expressions for frequency-domain waveforms. We study the accuracy of these analytic, frequency-domain waveforms relative to waveforms obtained by numerically evolving the post-Newtonian equations of motion and find that they are suitable for unbiased parameter estimation for 99.2%(94.6%) of the binary configurations we studied at a signal-to-noise ratio of 10(25). These new frequency-domain waveforms could be used for detection and parameter estimation studies due to their accuracy and low computational cost.
  • Gravitational waves encode invaluable information about the nature of the relatively unexplored extreme gravity regime, where the gravitational interaction is strong, non-linear and highly dynamical. Recent gravitational wave observations by advanced LIGO have provided the first glimpses into this regime, allowing for the extraction of new inferences on different aspects of theoretical physics. For example, these detections provide constraints on the mass of the graviton, Lorentz violation in the gravitational sector, the existence of large extra dimensions, the temporal variability of Newton's gravitational constant, and modified dispersion relations of gravitational waves. Many of these constraints, however, are not yet competitive with constraints obtained, for example, through Solar System observations or binary pulsar observations. In this paper, we study the degree to which theoretical physics inferences drawn from gravitational wave observations will strengthen with detections from future detectors. We consider future ground-based detectors, such as the LIGO-class expansions A+, Voyager, Cosmic Explorer and the Einstein Telescope, as well as various configurations the space-based detector LISA. We find that space-based detectors will place constraints on General Relativity up to 12 orders of magnitude more stringently than current aLIGO bounds, but these space-based constraints are comparable to those obtained with the ground-based Cosmic Explorer or the Einstein Telescope. We also generically find that improvements in the instrument sensitivity band at low frequencies lead to large improvements in certain classes of constraints, while sensitivity improvements at high frequencies lead to more modest gains. These results strengthen the case for the development of future detectors, while providing additional information that could be useful in future design decisions.
  • We calculate the energy and angular momentum fluxes across the event horizon of a tidally deformed, rapidly rotating black hole to next-to-leading order in the curvature of the external spacetime. These are expressed in terms of tidal quadrupole moments and their time derivatives, which provide a characterization of a generic tidal environment. As an application of our results, we provide an expression for the energy and angular-momentum fluxes across the horizon when the black hole is a member of a binary system on a slowly-moving, quasi-circular orbit. Our expressions are accurate to 1.5 post-Newtonian order beyond the leading-order fluxes, but they are valid for arbitrary mass ratios. We compare our results to those previously obtained in the case of an extreme mass ratio binary, and find that they do not agree at the 1.5 post-Newtonian order. We investigate a number of possible sources for this discrepancy, but are ultimately unable to resolve it.