• We present a machine learning based information retrieval system for astronomical observatories that tries to address user defined queries related to an instrument. In the modern instrumentation scenario where heterogeneous systems and talents are simultaneously at work, the ability to supply with the right information helps speeding up the detector maintenance operations. Enhancing the detector uptime leads to increased coincidence observation and improves the likelihood for the detection of astrophysical signals. Besides, such efforts will efficiently disseminate technical knowledge to a wider audience and will help the ongoing efforts to build upcoming detectors like the LIGO-India etc even at the design phase to foresee possible challenges. The proposed method analyses existing documented efforts at the site to intelligently group together related information to a query and to present it on-line to the user. The user in response can further go into interesting links and find already developed solutions or probable ways to address the present situation optimally. A web application that incorporates the above idea has been implemented and tested for LIGO Livingston, LIGO Hanford and Virgo observatories.
  • In the unified scheme of active galactic nuclei, a dusty torus absorbs and then reprocesses a fraction of the intrinsic luminosity which is emitted at longer wavelengths. Thus, subject to radiative transfer corrections, the fraction of the sky covered by the torus as seen from the central source (known as the covering factor $f_c$) can be estimated from the ratio of the infrared to the bolometric luminosities of the source as $f_c=L_{\rm torus}/L_{\rm Bol}$. However, the uncertainty in determining $L_{\rm Bol}$ has made the estimation of covering factors by this technique difficult, especially for AGN in the local Universe where the peak of the observed SEDs lies in the UV (ultraviolet). Here, we determine the covering factors of an X-ray/optically selected sample of 51 type~1 AGN. The bolometric luminosities of these sources are derived using a self-consistent, energy-conserving model that estimates the contribution in the unobservable far-UV region, using multi-frequency data obtained from SDSS, \textit{XMM-Newton}, \textit{WISE}, 2MASS and UKIDSS. We derive a mean value of $f_c\sim$0.30 with a dispersion of 0.17. Sample correlations, combined with simulations, show that $f_c$ is more strongly anti-correlated with $\lambda_{\rm Edd}$ than with $L_{\rm Bol}$. This points to large-scale torus geometry changes associated with the Eddington-dependent accretion flow, rather than a receding torus, with its inner sublimation radius determined solely by heating from the central source. Furthermore, we do not see any significant change in the distribution of $f_c$ for sub-samples of radio-loud sources or Narrow Line Seyfert~1 galaxies (NLS1s), though these sub-samples are small.
  • Detection and classification of transients in data from gravitational wave detectors are crucial for efficient searches for true astrophysical events and identification of noise sources. We present a hybrid method for classification of short duration transients seen in gravitational wave data using both supervised and unsupervised machine learning techniques. To train the classifiers we use the relative wavelet energy and the corresponding entropy obtained by applying one-dimensional wavelet decomposition on the data. The prediction accuracy of the trained classifier on 9 simulated classes of gravitational wave transients and also LIGO's sixth science run hardware injections are reported. Targeted searches for a couple of known classes of non-astrophysical signals in the first observational run of Advanced LIGO data are also presented. The ability to accurately identify transient classes using minimal training samples makes the proposed method a useful tool for LIGO detector characterization as well as searches for short duration gravitational wave signals.
  • Event Related Potentials (ERPs) are very feeble alterations in the ongoing Electroencephalogram (EEG) and their detection is a challenging problem. Based on the unique time-based parameters derived from wavelet coefficients and the asymmetry property of wavelets a novel algorithm to separate ERP components in single-trial EEG data is described. Though illustrated as a specific application to N170 ERP detection, the algorithm is a generalized approach that can be easily adapted to isolate different kinds of ERP components. The algorithm detected the N170 ERP component with a high level of accuracy. We demonstrate that the asymmetry method is more accurate than the matching wavelet algorithm and t-CWT method by 48.67 and 8.03 percent respectively. This paper provides an off-line demonstration of the algorithm and considers issues related to the extension of the algorithm to real-time applications.
  • We present a catalogue of about 6 million unresolved photometric detections in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Seventh Data Release classifying them into stars, galaxies and quasars. We use a machine learning classifier trained on a subset of spectroscopically confirmed objects from 14th to 22nd magnitude in the SDSS {\it i}-band. Our catalogue consists of 2,430,625 quasars, 3,544,036 stars and 63,586 unresolved galaxies from 14th to 24th magnitude in the SDSS {\it i}-band. Our algorithm recovers 99.96% of spectroscopically confirmed quasars and 99.51% of stars to i $\sim$21.3 in the colour window that we study. The level of contamination due to data artefacts for objects beyond $i=21.3$ is highly uncertain and all mention of completeness and contamination in the paper are valid only for objects brighter than this magnitude. However, a comparison of the predicted number of quasars with the theoretical number counts shows reasonable agreement.
  • A learning algorithm based on primary school teaching and learning is presented. The methodology is to continuously evaluate a student and to give them training on the examples for which they repeatedly fail, until, they can correctly answer all types of questions. This incremental learning procedure produces better learning curves by demanding the student to optimally dedicate their learning time on the failed examples. When used in machine learning, the algorithm is found to train a machine on a data with maximum variance in the feature space so that the generalization ability of the network improves. The algorithm has interesting applications in data mining, model evaluations and rare objects discovery.
  • We report results from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge (SNPCC), a publicly released mix of simulated supernovae (SNe), with types (Ia, Ibc, and II) selected in proportion to their expected rate. The simulation was realized in the griz filters of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with realistic observing conditions (sky noise, point-spread function and atmospheric transparency) based on years of recorded conditions at the DES site. Simulations of non-Ia type SNe are based on spectroscopically confirmed light curves that include unpublished non-Ia samples donated from the Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP), the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II). A spectroscopically confirmed subset was provided for training. We challenged scientists to run their classification algorithms and report a type and photo-z for each SN. Participants from 10 groups contributed 13 entries for the sample that included a host-galaxy photo-z for each SN, and 9 entries for the sample that had no redshift information. Several different classification strategies resulted in similar performance, and for all entries the performance was significantly better for the training subset than for the unconfirmed sample. For the spectroscopically unconfirmed subset, the entry with the highest average figure of merit for classifying SNe~Ia has an efficiency of 0.96 and an SN~Ia purity of 0.79. As a public resource for the future development of photometric SN classification and photo-z estimators, we have released updated simulations with improvements based on our experience from the SNPCC, added samples corresponding to the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the SDSS, and provided the answer keys so that developers can evaluate their own analysis.
  • In this paper we describe the use of a new artificial neural network, called the difference boosting neural network (DBNN), for automated classification problems in astronomical data analysis. We illustrate the capabilities of the network by applying it to star galaxy classification using recently released, deep imaging data. We have compared our results with classification made by the widely used Source Extractor (SExtractor) package. We show that while the performance of the DBNN in star-galaxy classification is comparable to that of SExtractor, it has the advantage of significantly higher speed and flexibility during training as well as classification.
  • Rainfall in Kerala State, the southern part of Indian Peninsula in particular is caused by the two monsoons and the two cyclones every year. In general, climate and rainfall are highly nonlinear phenomena in nature giving rise to what is known as the `butterfly effect'. We however attempt to train an ABF neural network on the time series rainfall data and show for the first time that in spite of the fluctuations resulting from the nonlinearity in the system, the trends in the rainfall pattern in this corner of the globe have remained unaffected over the past 87 years from 1893 to 1980. We also successfully filter out the chaotic part of the system and illustrate that its effects are marginal over long term predictions.
  • This paper discusses mixing of chaotic systems as a dependable method for secure communication. Distribution of the entropy function for steady state as well as plaintext input sequences are analyzed. It is shown that the mixing of chaotic sequences results in a sequence that does not have any state dependence on the information encrypted by them. The generated output states of such a cipher approach the theoretical maximum for both complexity measures and cycle length. These features are then compared with some popular ciphers.
  • A Bayesian classifier that up-weights the differences in the attribute values is discussed. Using four popular datasets from the UCI repository, some interesting features of the network are illustrated. The network is suitable for classification problems.
  • The difference-boosting algorithm is used on letters dataset from the UCI repository to classify distorted raster images of English alphabets. In contrast to rather complex networks, the difference-boosting is found to produce comparable or better classification efficiency on this complex problem.