• The South Pole Telescope has discovered one hundred gravitationally lensed, high-redshift, dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs). We present 0.5" resolution 870um Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array imaging of a sample of 47 DSFGs spanning z=1.9-5.7, and construct gravitational lens models of these sources. Our visibility-based lens modeling incorporates several sources of residual interferometric calibration uncertainty, allowing us to properly account for noise in the observations. At least 70% of the sources are strongly lensed by foreground galaxies (mu_870um > 2), with a median magnification mu_870um = 6.3, extending to mu_870um > 30. We compare the intrinsic size distribution of the strongly lensed sources to a similar number of unlensed DSFGs and find no significant differences in spite of a bias between the magnification and intrinsic source size. This may indicate that the true size distribution of DSFGs is relatively narrow. We use the source sizes to constrain the wavelength at which the dust optical depth is unity and find this wavelength to be correlated with the dust temperature. This correlation leads to discrepancies in dust mass estimates of a factor of 2 compared to estimates using a single value for this wavelength. We investigate the relationship between the [CII] line and the far-infrared luminosity and find that the same correlation between the [CII]L_FIR ratio and Sigma_FIR found for low-redshift star-forming galaxies applies to high-redshift galaxies and extends at least two orders of magnitude higher in Sigma_FIR. This lends further credence to the claim that the compactness of the IR-emitting region is the controlling parameter in establishing the "[CII] deficit."
  • This White Paper presents the scientific motivations for a multi-object spectrograph (MOS) on the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The MOS case draws on all fields of contemporary astronomy, from extra-solar planets, to the study of the halo of the Milky Way and its satellites, and from resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies out to observations of the earliest 'first-light' structures in the partially-reionised Universe. The material presented here results from thorough discussions within the community over the past four years, building on the past competitive studies to agree a common strategy toward realising a MOS capability on the E-ELT. The cases have been distilled to a set of common requirements which will be used to define the MOSAIC instrument, entailing two observational modes ('high multiplex' and 'high definition'). When combined with the unprecedented sensitivity of the E-ELT, MOSAIC will be the world's leading MOS facility. In analysing the requirements we also identify a high-multiplex MOS for the longer-term plans for the E-ELT, with an even greater multiplex (>1000 targets) to enable studies of large-scale structures in the high-redshift Universe. Following the green light for the construction of the E-ELT the MOS community, structured through the MOSAIC consortium, is eager to realise a MOS on the E-ELT as soon as possible. We argue that several of the most compelling cases for ELT science, in highly competitive areas of modern astronomy, demand such a capability. For example, MOS observations in the early stages of E-ELT operations will be essential for follow-up of sources identified by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). In particular, multi-object adaptive optics and accurate sky subtraction with fibres have both recently been demonstrated on sky, making fast-track development of MOSAIC feasible.
  • The workhorse instruments of the 8-10m class observatories have become their multi-object spectrographs (MOS), providing comprehensive follow-up to both ground-based and space-borne imaging. With the advent of deeper imaging surveys from, e.g., the HST and VISTA, there are a plethora of spectroscopic targets which are already beyond the sensitivity limits of current facilities. This wealth of targets will grow even more rapidly in the coming years, e.g., after the completion of ALMA, the launch of the JWST and Euclid, and the advent of the LSST. Thus, one of the key requirements underlying plans for the next generation of ground-based telescopes, the Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs), is for even greater sensitivity for optical and infrared spectroscopy. Here we revisit the scientific motivation for a MOS capability on the European ELT, combining updated elements of science cases advanced from the Phase A instrument studies with new science cases which draw on the latest results and discoveries. These science cases address key questions related to galaxy evolution over cosmic time, from studies of resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies out to observations of the most distant galaxies, and are used to identify the top-level requirements on an 'E-ELT/MOS'. We argue that several of the most compelling ELT science cases demand MOS observations, in highly competitive areas of modern astronomy. Recent technical studies have demonstrated that important issues related to e.g. sky subtraction and multi-object AO can be solved, making fast- track development of a MOS instrument feasible. To ensure that ESO retains world leadership in exploring the most distant objects in the Universe, galaxy evolution and stellar populations, we are convinced that a MOS should have high priority in the instrumentation plan for the E-ELT.
  • Using HST/ACS observations, we measure the color gradients of 3248 galaxies in the GOODS-South field out to z~3 and i_{AB}<25.5 and characterize their dependence on galaxy properties (luminosity, apparent magnitude, galaxy size, redshift and morphological type). The color gradient is measured by the difference of v-i color outside (R_{50}<r<2R_{50}) and inside the half light radius. The gradient shows little evolution with redshift up to z~1 but increases from z~1 to z~2 before flattening out. It also increases with apparent magnitude, with a median value of 0.24 magnitudes at i_{AB}~25.5. It has a strong color dependence, with the bluest galaxies (in terms of observed color) having cores that are bluer relative to their outskirts. We probe the redshift evolution by stacking galaxies and measuring the radial variation of v-i color within them. At low redshifts (z<0.5), the centres of galaxies (r<R_{50}) are slightly redder than their outskirts (1.5R_{50}<r<2R_{50}). Galaxies at z~1 and -22.0<M_I<-21.0 are bluer in their cores by 0.1 magnitudes, on average, compared to their outskirts. For z>1, galaxies show increasingly bluer cores while the color of the outskirts does not change as rapidly. At z~2.5 and -22.0<M_I<-21.0, we observe a difference, on average, of 0.4 magnitudes between the centre and the outskirts. The observed color gradients may indicate that strong star formation in galaxies at z>=2 is concentrated in their central regions. These color gradients and their dependence on galaxy properties could also have a significant impact on shear measurements in upcoming weak lensing cosmological surveys.
  • We perform a pixel-by-pixel analysis of 467 galaxies in the GOODS-VIMOS survey to study systematic effects in extracting properties of stellar populations (age, dust, metallicity and SFR) from pixel colors using the pixel-z method. The systematics studied include the effect of the input stellar population synthesis model, passband limitations and differences between individual SED fits to pixels and global SED-fitting to a galaxy's colors. We find that with optical-only colors, the systematic errors due to differences among the models are well constrained. The largest impact on the age and SFR e-folding time estimates in the pixels arises from differences between the Maraston models and the Bruzual&Charlot models, when optical colors are used. This results in systematic differences larger than the 2{\sigma} uncertainties in over 10 percent of all pixels in the galaxy sample. The effect of restricting the available passbands is more severe. In 26 percent of pixels in the full sample, passband limitations result in systematic biases in the age estimates which are larger than the 2{\sigma} uncertainties. Systematic effects from model differences are reexamined using Near-IR colors for a subsample of 46 galaxies in the GOODS-NICMOS survey. For z > 1, the observed optical/NIR colors span the rest frame UV-optical SED, and the use of different models does not significantly bias the estimates of the stellar population parameters compared to using optical-only colors. We then illustrate how pixel-z can be applied robustly to make detailed studies of substructure in high redshift galaxies such as (a) radial gradients of age, SFR, sSFR and dust and (b) the distribution of these properties within subcomponents such as spiral arms and clumps. Finally, we show preliminary results from the CANDELS survey illustrating how the new HST/WFC3 data can be exploited to probe substructure in z~1-3 galaxies.
  • In this second of a series of papers on spatially resolved star formation, we investigate the impact of the density-morphology relation of galaxies on the spatial variation of star formation (SF) and its dependence on environment. We find that while a density-morphology relation is present for the sample, it cannot solely explain the observed suppression of SF in galaxies in high-density environments. We also find that early-type and late-type galaxies exhibit distinct radial star formation rate (SFR) distributions, with early-types having a SFR distribution that extends further relative to the galaxy scale length, compared to late-types at all densities. We find that a suppression of SF in the highest density environments is found in the highest star forming galaxies for both galaxy types. This suppression occurs in the innermost regions in late-types (r <= 0.125 Petrosian radii), and further out in radius in early-types (0.125< r <= 0.25 Petrosian radii). When the full sample is considered no clear suppression of SF is detected, indicating that the environmental trends are driven only by the highest SF galaxies. We demonstrate that the density-morphology relation alone cannot account for the suppression of SF in the highest density environments. This points to an environmentally-governed evolutionary mechanism that affects the SF in the innermost regions in both early and late-type galaxies. We suggest that this is a natural consequence of the "downsizing" of SF in galaxies.
  • We use the photometric information contained in individual pixels of 44,964 (0.019<z<0.125 and -23.5<M_r<-20.5) galaxies in the Fourth Data Release (DR4) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the effects of environment on galaxy star formation (SF). We use the pixel-z technique, which combines stellar population synthesis models with photometric redshift template fitting on the scale of individual pixels in galaxy images. Spectral energy distributions are constructed, sampling a wide range of properties such as age, star formation rate (SFR), dust obscuration and metallicity. By summing the SFRs in the pixels, we demonstrate that the distribution of total galaxy SFR shifts to lower values as the local density of surrounding galaxies increases, as found in other studies. The effect is most prominent in the galaxies with the highest star formation, and we see the break in the SFR-density relation at a local galaxy density of $\approx 0.05 $(Mpc/h)$^{-3}$. Since our method allows us to spatially resolve the SF distribution within galaxies, we can calculate the mean SFR of each galaxy as a function of radius. We find that on average the mean SFR is dominated by SF in the central regions of galaxies, and that the trend for suppression of SFR in high density environments is driven by a reduction in this nuclear SF. We also find that the mean SFR in the outskirts is largely independent of environmental effects. This trend in the mean SFR is shared by galaxies which are highly star forming, while those which are weakly star forming show no statistically significant correlation between their environment and the mean SFR at any radius.