• We demonstrate the experimental feasibility of a Trojan-horse attack that remains nearly invisible to the single-photon detectors employed in practical quantum key distribution (QKD) systems, such as Clavis2 from ID Quantique. We perform a detailed numerical comparison of the attack performance against Scarani-Acin-Ribordy-Gisin (SARG04) QKD protocol at 1924nm versus that at 1536nm. The attack strategy was proposed earlier but found to be unsuccessful at the latter wavelength, as reported in N.~Jain et al., New J. Phys. 16, 123030 (2014). However at 1924nm, we show experimentally that the noise response of the detectors to bright pulses is greatly reduced, and show by modeling that the same attack will succeed. The invisible nature of the attack poses a threat to the security of practical QKD if proper countermeasures are not adopted.
  • We experimentally demonstrate temporal reshaping of optical waveforms in the telecom wavelength band using the principle of quantum frequency conversion. The reshaped optical pulses do not undergo any wavelength translation. The interaction takes place in a nonlinear $\chi^{(2)}$ waveguide using an appropriately designed pump pulse programmed via an optical waveform generator. We show reshaping of a single-peak pulse into a double-peak pulse and vice versa. We also show that exponentially decaying pulses can be reshaped into near Gaussian shape, and vice versa, which is a useful functionality for quantum communications.
  • Quantum frequency conversion (QFC) of photonic signals preserves quantum information while simultaneously changing the signal wavelength. A common application of QFC is to translate the wavelength of a signal compatible with the current fiber-optic infrastructure to a shorter wavelength more compatible with high quality single-photon detectors and optical memories. Recent work has investigated the use of QFC to manipulate and measure specific temporal modes (TMs) through tailoring of the pump pulses. Such a scheme holds promise for multidimensional quantum state manipulation that is both low loss and re-programmable on a fast time scale. We demonstrate the first QFC temporal mode sorting system in a four-dimensional Hilbert space, achieving a conversion efficiency and mode separability as high as 92% and 0.84, respectively. A 20-GHz pulse train is projected onto 6 different TMs, including superposition states, and mode separability with weak coherent signals is verified via photon counting. Such ultrafast high-dimensional photonic signals could enable long-distance quantum communication with high rates.
  • With the emergence of an information society, the idea of protecting sensitive data is steadily gaining importance. Conventional encryption methods may not be sufficient to guarantee data protection in the future. Quantum key distribution (QKD) is an emerging technology that exploits fundamental physical properties to guarantee perfect security in theory. However, it is not easy to ensure in practice that the implementations of QKD systems are exactly in line with the theoretical specifications. Such theory-practice deviations can open loopholes and compromise the security. Several of such loopholes have been discovered and investigated in the last decade. These activities have motivated the proposal and implementation of appropriate countermeasures, thereby preventing future attacks and enhancing the practical security of QKD. This article introduces the so-called field of quantum hacking by summarizing a variety of attacks and their prevention mechanisms.
  • We propose a novel upconversion (sum frequency generation) based quantum-optical setup that can be employed as a receiver (Bob) in practical quantum key distribution systems. The pump governing the upconversion process is produced and utilized inside the physical receiver, making its access or control unrealistic for an external adversary (Eve). This pump facilitates several properties which permit Bob to define and control the modes that can participate in the quantum measurement. Furthermore, by manipulating and monitoring the characteristics of the pump pulses, Bob can detect a wide range of quantum hacking attacks launched by Eve.
  • An eavesdropper Eve may probe a quantum key distribution (QKD) system by sending a bright pulse from the quantum channel into the system and analyzing the back-reflected pulses. Such Trojan-horse attacks can breach the security of the QKD system if appropriate safeguards are not installed or if they can be fooled by Eve. We present a risk analysis of such attacks based on extensive spectral measurements, such as transmittance, reflectivity, and detection sensitivity of some critical components used in typical QKD systems. Our results indicate the existence of wavelength regimes where the attacker gains considerable advantage as compared to launching an attack at 1550 nm. We also propose countermeasures to reduce the risk of such attacks.
  • A quantum key distribution system may be probed by an eavesdropper Eve by sending in bright light from the quantum channel and analyzing the back-reflections. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a setup for mounting such a Trojan-horse attack. We show it in operation against the quantum cryptosystem Clavis2 from ID~Quantique, as a proof-of-principle. With just a few back-reflected photons, Eve discerns Bob's secret basis choice, and thus the raw key bit in the Scarani-Ac\'in-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 protocol, with higher than 90% probability. This would clearly breach the security of the cryptosystem. Unfortunately in Clavis2 Eve's bright pulses have a side effect of causing high level of afterpulsing in Bob's single-photon detectors, resulting in a high quantum bit error rate that effectively protects this system from our attack. However, in a Clavis2-like system equipped with detectors with less-noisy but realistic characteristics, an attack strategy with positive leakage of the key would exist. We confirm this by a numerical simulation. Both the eavesdropping setup and strategy can be generalized to attack most of the current QKD systems, especially if they lack proper safeguards. We also propose countermeasures to prevent such attacks.
  • The most important ability of a quantum channel is to preserve the quantum properties of transmitted quantum states. We experimentally demonstrate a continuous-variable system for efficient benchmarking of quantum channels. We probe the tested quantum channels for a wide range of experimental parameters such as amplitude, phase noise and channel lengths up to 40 km. The data is analyzed using the framework of effective entanglement. We subsequently are able to deduce an optimal point of operation for each quantum channel with respect to the rate of distributed entanglement. This procedure is a promising candidate for benchmarking quantum nodes and individual links in large quantum networks of different physical implementations.
  • With photons being the only available candidates for long-distance quantum communication, most quantum cryptographic devices are physically realized as optical systems that operate a security protocol based on the laws of quantum mechanics. But to finally yield a stream of bits (secret key) usable for encryption, a quantum-to-classical transition is required. Synchronization of electronic & optoelectronic components involved in such tasks thus becomes a necessary and important step. However, it also opens up the possibility of timing-based loopholes and attacks.
  • Characterizing the physical channel and calibrating the cryptosystem hardware are prerequisites for establishing a quantum channel for quantum key distribution (QKD). Moreover, an inappropriately implemented calibration routine can open a fatal security loophole. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a method to induce a large temporal detector efficiency mismatch in a commercial QKD system by deceiving a channel length calibration routine. We then devise an optimal and realistic strategy using faked states to break the security of the cryptosystem. A fix for this loophole is also suggested.
  • We introduce the concept of a superlinear threshold detector, a detector that has a higher probability to detect multiple photons if it receives them simultaneously rather than at separate times. Highly superlinear threshold detectors in quantum key distribution systems allow eavesdropping the full secret key without being revealed. Here, we generalize the detector control attack, and analyze how it performs against quantum key distribution systems with moderately superlinear detectors. We quantify the superlinearity in superconducting single-photon detectors based on earlier published data, and gated avalanche photodiode detectors based on our own measurements. The analysis shows that quantum key distribution systems using detector(s) of either type can be vulnerable to eavesdropping. The avalanche photodiode detector becomes superlinear towards the end of the gate, allowing eavesdropping using trigger pulses containing less than 120 photons per pulse. Such an attack would be virtually impossible to catch with an optical power meter at the receiver entrance.
  • The two modes of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen quadrature entangled state generated by parametric down-conversion interfere on a beam splitter of variable splitting ratio. Detection of a photon in one of the beam splitter output channels heralds preparation of a signal state in the other, which is characterized using homodyne tomography. By controlling the beam splitting ratio, the signal state can be chosen anywhere between the single-photon and squeezed state.
  • We propose and experimentally verify a scheme to engineer arbitrary states of traveling light field up to the two-photon level. The desired state is remotely prepared in the signal channel of spontaneous parametric down-conversion by means of conditional measurements on the idler channel. The measurement consists of bringing the idler field into interference with two ancilla coherent states, followed by two single-photon detectors, which, in coincidence, herald the preparation event. By varying the amplitudes and phases of the ancillae, we can prepare any arbitrary superposition of zero- one- and two-photon states.
  • Heralded single photons are prepared at a rate of ~100 kHz via conditional measurements on polarization-nondegenerate biphotons produced in a periodically poled KTP crystal. The single-photon Fock state is characterized using high frequency pulsed optical homodyne tomography with a fidelity of (57.6 +- 0.1)%. The state preparation and detection rates allowed us to perform on-the-fly alignment of the apparatus based on real-time analysis of the quadrature measurement statistics.